Dorothy A. Stephens
Department Chair
333 Kimpel Hall
479-575-4301
E-mail: dstephen@uark.edu 

Lisa A. Hinrichsen
Director of Graduate Studies
333 Kimpel Hall
479-575-4301
E-mail: lhinrich@uark.edu

http://english.uark.edu/

Degrees Conferred:

M.A., Ph.D. (ENGL)
M.F.A. in Creative Writing (CRWR)

Graduate Certificate Offered (non-degree):

Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics (TWRHGC)

Primary Areas of Faculty Research: English, American, and Anglophone literature; creative writing; poetics; literary translation; rhetoric and composition; literacy; linguistics; comparative literature; literary theory; service-learning; gender studies; peace and conflict studies; indigenous studies; southern studies; post-colonialism; science fiction; popular culture; American studies; African American studies; Latino/Latina studies; Central American literature; Muslim literature and culture, European studies; medieval Welsh; medieval and renaissance studies; digital humanities; sustainability and ecocriticism; folklore; music and literature; theatre; archival studies; politics and literature; religion and literature; psychoanalysis and literature; technology and literature; social media; film studies; the visual arts as text; professionalization in the humanities.

Areas of Study: Under each of the degree and certificate programs, the following areas of study are among those available:

  • Master of Arts – history and criticism of literature in English; rhetoric, composition, and literacy.
  • Master of Fine Arts – fiction, poetry, translation.
  • Doctor of Philosophy – Medieval literature; Renaissance literature to 1660; Restoration and eighteenth-century British literature; nineteenth-century British literature; modern and contemporary British literature; American literature to 1900; modern and contemporary American literature; linguistics; literary criticism and theory; American southern literature and culture; world literature and culture in English; American multiculturalism; gender studies; film and media studies; popular culture and popular genres; literary history; rhetoric, composition, and literacy.
  • Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics – document design, writing for online audiences, technical editing, technical writing praxis and practice.

Admission to Degree Programs and Certificate Program: Detailed instructions for the application process are on the English Department website. Each applicant must submit a separate application to the Graduate School and either the Director of Graduate Studies (for the M.A. and Ph.D. programs), the Director of Creative Writing (for the M.F.A. program), or the Director of Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics (for the Graduate Certificate program).

Requirements for the Master of Arts Degree

For further information about the Master of Arts Degree program, visit the "M.A./Ph.D. in English" pages on the English Department website.

In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, the department stipulates that the following conditions be met:

  1. Each candidate must complete a total of 30 credit hours.
  2. Each candidate must take:
    1. ENGL 5203 Introduction to Graduate Studies (Irregular), one course emphasizing theory, and two courses at the seminar (6000) level
    2. ENGL 5213 Portfolio Workshop (Sp) (and successfully present a portfolio for the final project) or six thesis hours (and successfully defend a thesis for the final project)
      1. The candidate's portfolio or thesis, which will be used to fulfill the comprehensive exam requirement for the degree, is evaluated by faculty committee and scored Pass/Fail.
  3. Each candidate must also select either the Generalist Concentration or the Specialist Concentration and take the following courses:​
    1. Generalist Concentration (Portfolio Track)
      1. Two courses selected from two of the following three areas: Medieval Literature and Culture; Renaissance Literature and Culture; Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture
      2. Three courses selected from three of the following five areas (at least one course being in British literature and at least one course being in American literature): Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture; Modern and Contemporary British Literature and Culture; American Literature and Culture before 1900; Modern and Contemporary American Literature and Culture; World Literature and Culture in English
      3. Three elective courses offered by the Department of English or as approved by the student's graduate advisor
    2. Generalist Concentration (Thesis Track)
      1. Two courses selected from two of the following three areas: Medieval Literature and Culture; Renaissance Literature and Culture; Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture
      2. Three courses selected from three of the following five areas (at least one course being in British literature and at least one course being in American literature): Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture; Modern and Contemporary British Literature and Culture; American Literature and Culture before 1900; Modern and Contemporary American Literature and Culture; World Literature and Culture in English
      3. Two elective courses offered by the Department of English or as approved by the student's graduate advisor
    3. Specialist Concentration (Portfolio Track)
      1. Five courses in one of the following areas of specialization: Comparative Literature; Cultural Studies; Ethnic and Regional Literatures; Gender and Sexuality; Medieval Literature; Modern American Literature; Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy
      2. Three elective courses offered by the Department of English or as approved by the student's graduate advisor
    4. Specialist Concentration (Thesis Track)
      1. Five courses in one of the following areas of specialization: Comparative Literature; Cultural Studies; Ethnic and Regional Literatures; Gender and Sexuality; Medieval Literature; Modern American Literature; Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy
      2. Two elective courses offered by the Department of English or as approved by the student's graduate advisor
  4. Each candidate must demonstrate a reading knowledge of a language other than English that is relevant to the student’s area of study.  French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, and Latin are the normally acceptable choices, although other languages may be used with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.  (For details about this requirement, see section 2, a-c, under “Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree," below.)
  5. Each candidate must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.33 for the total number of hours presented for the degree and may take a maximum of one course at the 4000 level for credit with approval from the Director of Graduate Studies.

Graduate Student Appeal Process:  Any M.A. student who is notified that he or she is being dismissed from the graduate program due to inadequate progress toward his or her degree has the right to appeal such a decision.  The process for appealing is as follows:

  1. The student may contact the Director of Graduate Studies to determine whether the student can take further steps to avoid being dismissed from the program.
  2. If the Director of Graduate Studies advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student may appeal this decision to the Department Chair.
  3. If the Department Chair advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student may appeal this decision to the Academic Appeals Committee of the Graduate Council through the graduate student academic grievance process.

If the Graduate Council advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Students should also be aware of Graduate School requirements with regard to master's degrees.

Requirements for the Master of Fine Arts Degree in Creative Writing

The program leading to the degree of Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing provides graduate-level training in creative writing and in the study of literature.

Required Courses: 60 hours are required for the M.F.A. degree. 

  1.  Required Writing and Craft Courses
    1. Writing Workshop (15 to 24 semester hours)
    2. Craft of Fiction, Poetry, or Translation (9 hours total: 6 hours in student’s primary genre; 3 hours in second genre)
    3. Modern/Contemporary Fiction and Poetry (9 hours total; 6 hours in student’s primary genre; 3 hours in second genre)
  2.  Other Advanced Courses (4000-level or higher): 18-30 hours of literature or approved courses, at least 3 hours of which must be a course that focuses on literature written prior to 1900 and 3 hours of which must be a literature course that emphasizes cultural diversity.

    3.   Thesis Advising: 6 hours.

Thesis: An M.F.A. thesis may be a collection of poems or stories or a novel. For students whose primary genre is Translation, the thesis will consist of a significant body of work (i.e., poems, stories, or a novel) translated from the original language into English. The thesis should be of the quality of those works currently published by national magazines, by literary journals, and by legitimate book publishers.

Final Examination: Each M.F.A. candidate must pass a one-hour oral examination and defense of the thesis. Awarding of the M.F.A. degree requires approval of the faculty committee.

Grade Requirement: Per Graduate School policy, M.F.A. candidates must present a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.85 on all graduate courses required for the degree in order to earn the M.F.A. Failing to earn such an average on the minimum number of hours, the student is permitted to present up to six additional course (not thesis) hours of graduate credit in order to accumulate a grade-point average of 2.85. In the computation of grade point, all courses pursued at this institution for graduate credit (including any repeated courses) shall be considered. Students who repeat a course in an endeavor to raise their grade must count the repetition toward the maximum of six additional hours. If a student encounters academic difficulty after having already completed six credit hours for the degree beyond the minimum degree requirements, no additional hours may be taken. Please note that the Graduate School calculates grade-point average on all graduate-level coursework displayed on the transcript.  

All students working toward the degree will plan their specific programs in consultation with their advisers. All degree requirements must be completed within six consecutive calendar years from the date of first enrollment.

Find out more about the program at the Creative Writing website.

Focused Study in Rhetoric and Composition

Students earning the Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing may choose Rhetoric and Composition as a field of focused study. Students who choose this option are required to do the following:

  1. Take ENGL 5003 Composition Pedagogy (Fa); ENGL 5973 Advanced Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular) or ENGL 6973 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular); and an additional graduate-level course in Rhetoric and Composition approved by the Director of Composition. 
  2. Teach five of the following writing courses offered by the English Department:
  3. Earn 10 professional development points from the Program in Rhetoric and Composition by engaging in any combination of the following activities:
    • Presenting research at any Rhetoric and Composition conference (three points)
    • Organizing or leading a PRC workshop (two points)
    • Participating in a PRC workshop (one point)
    • Coordinating a PRC course or project (three points)

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree

For more information about the Doctor of Philosophy Degree program, visit the "M.A./Ph.D. in English" pages on the English Department website.

In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, the department stipulates that these requirements be met:

  1. A student who begins doctoral study here may be required, at the discretion of the Director of Graduate Studies, to take certain designated deficiency courses in lieu of electives.  However, these hours will count toward the 24-hour course requirement for the doctoral degree.
  2. Each doctoral candidate is required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of at least one language other than English that is relevant to the student's area of study.  French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, and Latin are the normally acceptable choices to meet the foreign language requirement, although other languages may be used with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies. Students who elect the medieval period as the field of specialization must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Latin, Old English, and Middle English as well as one relevant modern language. Doctoral candidates can meet the foreign language requirement by documenting that they have met a foreign language requirement at the University of Arkansas or another accredited M.A. program no more than two years before starting the Ph.D. program. This requirement should be met as early as possible in the student’s program of study, preferably before registration for doctoral dissertation hours.
    For either the M.A. or Ph.D. degree, reading knowledge must be demonstrated in one of the following ways:
    1. The student passes a test of reading knowledge as administered through the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures or by a member of the faculty of another department in the University who is competent to assess reading knowledge in the given language. The Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures administers testing either in conjunction with Ph.D. reading courses (course number 3063) in French, German, Latin, or Spanish; or through individual examinations. Students wishing to be examined in a foreign language should contact the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures well before the test to familiarize themselves with the different requirements of each language program.
    2. The student presents evidence of having completed the equivalent of one semester of graduate or upper-level undergraduate study in the given foreign language with a grade of “B” or above at an accredited college or university.
    3. The student documents that the language in question is his or her native language and that he or she has native fluency in the language.
  3. By the time they take the candidacy examinations, students must have completed the 24-hour course requirement or be registered for courses which, if passed, will complete the 24-hour course requirement.  Students must pass both candidacy exams before registering for dissertation hours.
  4. To strengthen and support a field of specialization, each student may take up to six hours of graduate course work in other departments. Subject to the approval of the student’s adviser, these hours will count toward the 24-hour course requirement for the degree.
  5. Students in the doctoral program are required to complete 24 semester hours of course work for graduate credit beyond the M.A. degree. This work must include at least one course in critical theory and at least four seminar courses, at least one of which must be in the field of specialization.
  6. With the consent of the Graduate Studies Committee, students will declare a field of specialization. This declaration will be made prior to the completion of the candidate’s first year of doctoral studies; it must be made before arranging to take the written candidacy examination. The field of specialization may be a period (Medieval, Renaissance to 1660, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British, Nineteenth-Century British, Modern and Contemporary British, American to 1900, Modern and Contemporary American) or an area (Southern Literature and Culture, World Literature and Culture in English, American Multiculturalism, Gender Studies, Film and Media Studies, Literary Criticism and Theory, Popular Culture and Popular Genres, and Literary History). In conjunction with their committee and with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, students may propose additional fields if their particular projects do not fit within any of the suggested areas.
  7. The Director of Graduate Studies in the department must be notified by each student of his or her intention to take the candidacy examinations a month before the end of the term preceding the date of the examinations, which will be scheduled by the student in consultation with the committee administering the examinations. At the time of the candidacy examinations, each student must have a grade-point average of 3.50 for courses taken beyond the master’s degree. 
  8. Each student must pass the following candidacy examinations:
    1. A 72-hour take-home written examination in the field of specialization.
    2. An oral examination on a specific topic within the student’s broad field, approved jointly by the student and the exam committee. Students may retake only once any examination they fail.
  9. Upon successfully completing the candidacy exams, if a dissertation prospectus has not already been submitted to the student's committee for approval, each student must submit a dissertation prospectus to be discussed and approved in a formal meeting with the student’s dissertation committee.
  10. Within the time limits specified by the Graduate School, each student must complete 18 dissertation hours and submit a dissertation acceptable to the student’s dissertation committee.
  11. Each student must pass a dissertation defense administered by the student’s dissertation committee.

Graduate Student Appeal Process:  Any Ph.D. student who is notified that he or she is being dismissed from the graduate program due to inadequate progress toward his or her degree has the right to appeal such a decision.  The process for appealing is as follows:

  1. The student may contact the Director of Graduate Studies to determine whether the student can take further steps to avoid being dismissed from the program.
  2. If the Director of Graduate Studies advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student may appeal this decision to the Department Chair.
  3. If the Department Chair advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student may appeal this decision to the Academic Appeals Committee of the Graduate Council through the graduate student academic grievance process.

If the Graduate Council advises the student that the student can take no further steps to remain in the program, the student will be dismissed from the program.

Focused Study in Rhetoric and Composition

Students earning the Doctor of Philosophy in English may choose Rhetoric and Composition as a field of focused study. Students who choose this option are required to do the following:

  1. Take ENGL 5003 Composition Pedagogy (Fa); ENGL 5973 Advanced Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular) or ENGL 6973 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular); and an additional graduate-level course in Rhetoric and Composition approved by the Director of Composition.
  2. Teach five of the following writing courses offered by the English Department:
  1. Earn 10 professional development points from the Program in Rhetoric and Composition by engaging in any combination of the following activities:
  • Presenting research at any Rhetoric and Composition conference (three points)
  • Organizing or leading a PRC workshop (two points)
  • Participating in a PRC workshop (one point)
  • Coordinating a PRC course or project (three points)

Students should also be aware of Graduate School requirements with regard to doctoral degrees.

Requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics

For more information about the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics, visit the program's website. In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, the department stipulates that the following conditions must be met:

Requirements: In order to complete the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics, students must complete 12 credit hours of coursework, with at least 6 of these hours coming from the Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics core curriculum. The additional 6 hours of credit may come from a list of approved elective courses or from additional courses from the core curriculum. Students must earn a grade of ‘B’ or better for all courses used to fulfill the requirements of the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics. In addition to coursework, students are required to complete a Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics Portfolio consisting of at least 4 pieces from the student’s coursework in the program.

Core Curriculum6-9
Minimum 6 hours required
Document Design for Technical Writers (Odd years, Fa)
Technical Writing for Online Audiences (Even years, Fa)
Technical Writing Praxis (Su)
Elective Courses3-6
Maximum of 6 hours allowed
Advanced Studies in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics (Irregular)
Advanced Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular)
Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular)

Other relevant graduate coursework will be allowed on a case-by-case basis, subject to administrative approval and topical relevancy to the graduate certificate and its aims.

Portfolio: Students must consult with the Director of the Graduate Certificate in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics program during their final semester to develop and defend a portfolio. The program director will chair students' portfolio review committee; working with the director, students will choose two additional faculty members to serve on the committee and at least four pieces of writing to include in the portfolio.  Students will work with the committee to polish those pieces to a level appropriate for publication or non-profit, government, or corporate use.  When the portfolio is approved by the committee, students will host a public viewing of their works, and the portfolio will be added to the certificate program's online repository of student work hosted by the university library. 

English Courses

ENGL 5003. Composition Pedagogy (Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to teaching college composition. Designed for graduate assistants at the University of Arkansas.

ENGL 5013. Creative Writing Workshop (Irregular). 3 Hours.

ENGL 5023. Writing Workshop: Fiction (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Fiction writing workshop. Prerequisite: Creative Writing MFA students only.

ENGL 5033. Writing Workshop: Poetry (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Poetry writing workshop. Prerequisite: Creative Writing MFA students only.

ENGL 5043. Translation Workshop (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Problems of translation and the role of the translator as both scholar and creative writer; involves primarily the discussion in workshop of the translations of poetry, drama, and fiction done by the students, some emphasis upon comparative studies of existing translations of well-known works. Primary material will vary. Prerequisite: Reading knowledge of a foreign language and Creative Writing MFA students only. May be repeated for up to 15 hours of degree credit.

This course is cross-listed with WLLC 504V.

ENGL 5063. English Language and Composition for Teachers (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Subject matter and methods of approach for the teaching of composition in high school.

ENGL 507V. Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (Irregular). 1-3 Hour.

The theory and practice of the "New Journalism" with a study of its antecedents and special attention to the use of "fictional" techniques and narrator point of view to make more vivid the account of real people and real events.

ENGL 5083. Professing Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An introduction to the profession of English studies and the teaching of English at the college level.

ENGL 510V. Readings in English and American Literature (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Open to Honors candidates and graduate students. Prerequisite: Departmental approval and instructor approval required. May be repeated for degree credit.

ENGL 5173. Advanced Studies in Medieval Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5183. The Structure of Present English (Sp). 3 Hours.

Structural analysis of the language.

ENGL 5193. Graduate Internship in English (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Internship changes depending on availability and student interest. Departmental consent required.

ENGL 5203. Introduction to Graduate Studies (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Develop knowledge and strategies for successfully negotiating graduate work and the profession. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, scholarly habits and practices, writing and publishing skills, scholarly associations, journals, conferences, university structures, and career paths. Emphasis on the development of individual academic and professional goals.

ENGL 5213. Portfolio Workshop (Sp). 3 Hours.

Workshop designed for students in the M.A. Program in English who are using the Portfolio Option to complete the program. Instructor consent required.

ENGL 5223. Advanced Studies in Renaissance Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5233. Craft of Translation: I (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An examination of the principal challenges that confront translators of literature, including the recreation of style, dialect, ambiguities, and formal poetry; vertical translation; translation where multiple manuscripts exist; and the question of how literal a translation should be.

ENGL 5243. Special Topics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Designed to cover subject matter not offered in other courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

ENGL 5263. Craft of Fiction: I (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Such aspects of the genre as scene, transition, character, and conflict. Discussion is limited to the novel.

ENGL 5273. Craft of Poetry: I (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An examination of perception, diction, form, irony, resolution, and the critical theories of the major writers on poetry, such as Dryden, Coleridge, and Arnold.

ENGL 5283. Craft of Fiction: II (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Second part of the study of the techniques of fiction. Discussion is limited to the short story. Prerequisite: ENGL 5263.

ENGL 5293. Craft of Poetry: II (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Second part of the study of the techniques of poetry; independent study of a poet or a problem in writing or criticism of poetry.

ENGL 5303. Advanced Studies in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5313. Introduction to Literary Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An advanced introductory survey of a number of theoretical approaches to literature.

ENGL 5403. Advanced Studies in Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5413. Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5463. Descriptive Linguistics (Fa). 3 Hours.

A scientific study of language with primary emphasis on modern linguistic theory and analysis. Topics include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, and historical development of world languages.

This course is cross-listed with WLLC 5463, ANTH 5473.

ENGL 5513. Document Design for Technical Writers (Odd years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Focuses on the role of document design in technical and professional writing. Covers industry standard software and theories of rhetorically-centered document design. Special emphasis on creating print-ready technical documents such as manuals, catalogs, and infographics.

ENGL 5523. Technical Writing for Online Audiences (Even years, Fa). 3 Hours.

Investigates the medium-specific challenges of preparing technical documents for online audiences. Covers user-centered theory, strategies, and skills for online writing, HTML, CSS, and web standards. Specific focus on creating organizational websites with editorial workflows geared towards technical writers.

ENGL 5533. Technical Writing Praxis (Su). 3 Hours.

Focuses on the process of applying theory to situated practice in technical writing. The first portion of the course will lay out the fundamentals of technical writing theory, with the second half situating that theory within genre-specific practice. Second-half topics will vary by instructor interest and expertise. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5543. Advanced Studies in U.S. Latino/Latina Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of U.S. Latino/a literature and literary criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5563. Advanced Studies in Native American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of Native American literature, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5583. Advanced Studies in Arab American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of Arab American literature and criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. Research paper required. No knowledge of Arabic necessary. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5593. Advanced Studies in Gender, Sexuality, and Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of gender or sexuality and literature, with attention to specific theories, themes, genres, authors, historical moments, literary movements, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5603. World Literature and Culture in English (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5623. The Bible as Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms.

This course is cross-listed with WLIT 5623.

ENGL 5633. English Drama from Its Beginning to 1642 (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Early forms, Tudor drama, Shakespeare's contemporaries, and Stuart drama to the closing of the theatres.

ENGL 5653. Shakespeare: Plays and Poems (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An introduction to a broad selection of Shakespeare's work.

ENGL 569V. Seminar in Film Studies (Irregular). 1-3 Hour.

Research, discussion; papers on a variety of film genres and areas including the new American film, the science-fiction film, directors, film comedy, the experimental film, criticism, the film musical. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

This course is cross-listed with COMM 569V.

ENGL 5703. Advanced Studies in American Literature and Culture Before 1900 (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5723. Advanced Studies in Literature and Culture of the American South (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5763. Advanced Studies in Postcolonial Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5803. Advanced Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5863. Advanced Studies in African American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of African American literature and literary criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5923. Advanced Studies in Film and Media (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5933. Advanced Studies in Popular Culture and Popular Genres (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5943. Advanced Studies in Criticism and Literary Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5953. Advanced Studies in Literary History (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5963. Advanced Studies in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. Course will cover various topics relevant to students working in Technical Writing and Public Rhetorics. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 5973. Advanced Studies in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6113. Seminar in Medieval Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6193. The Development of English (Fa). 3 Hours.

Intensive course in the fundamentals of linguistic study and their application to the history of English from prehistoric times to the present.

ENGL 6203. Seminar in Renaissance Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6243. Seminar in Special Topics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6313. Seminar in Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6443. Seminar in Nineteenth-Century British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6513. Seminar in Modern and Contemporary British Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6543. Seminar in U.S. Latino/Latina Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of U.S. Latino/a literature and literary criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. At least one major research paper, suitable for presentation or publication, will be required. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6553. Seminar in Native American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of Native American literature, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. At least one major research paper, suitable for presentation or publication, will be required. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6583. Seminar in Arab American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of Arab American literature and criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. Research paper required. No knowledge of Arabic necessary. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6593. Seminar in Gender, Sexuality, and Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of gender or sexuality and literature, with attention to specific theories, themes, genres, authors, historical moments, literary movements, or other organizing principles. Content varies. At least one major research paper, suitable for presentation or publication, will be required. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6613. Seminar in World Literature and Culture in English (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6723. Seminar in American Literature and Culture Before 1900 (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6733. Seminar in Literature and Culture of the American South (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6763. Seminar in Postcolonial Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. At least one major research paper, suitable for presentation or publication, will be required. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6803. Seminar in Modern and Contemporary American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6853. Seminar in African American Literature and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of works of African American literature and literary criticism, with attention to particular themes, genres, authors, literary movements, historical moments, or other organizing principles. Content varies. At least one major research paper, suitable for presentation or publication, will be required. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6923. Seminar in Film and Media (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Extensive research into, and discussion of, a focused topic in film studies, with emphasis upon film as text. Extended project required. Course topic varies. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6933. Seminar in Popular Culture and Popular Genres (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6943. Seminar in Criticism and Literary Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6953. Seminar in Literary History (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 6973. Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Subject matter changes depending on student interest and faculty expertise. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ENGL 698V. Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

ENGL 699V. Master of Fine Arts Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

ENGL 700V. Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral Dissertation. May be repeated for degree credit.

World Literature Courses

WLIT 4123. Survey of Russian Literature from Its Beginning to the 1917 Revolution (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English.

This course is cross-listed with RUSS 4123.

WLIT 4133. Survey of Russian Literature Since the 1917 Revolution (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The instructor will discuss the historical and cultural backgrounds while focusing on major writers and will deal with literature as an outlet for social criticism. There will be textual analysis. It will be taught in English with readings in English.

This course is cross-listed with RUSS 4133.

WLIT 4993. African Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A study of modern African fiction, drama, poetry, and film from various parts of Africa in their cultural context. Works are in English or English translation.

WLIT 5193. Introduction to Comparative Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Literary theory, genres, movements, and influences. Prerequisite: WLIT 1113.

WLIT 5523. The Quran as Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The Quran as literary text: its style and form, historical context, translation, issues, communities of interpretation, and comparative perspectives. Course's integrated approach includes translations of literature originally in Arabic. All readings in English; students with reading abilities in Arabic encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 5623. The Bible as Literature (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The several translations of the Bible; its qualities as great literature; its influence upon literature in English; types of literary forms.

This course is cross-listed with ENGL 5623.

WLIT 575V. Special Investigations on World Literatures and Cultures (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Independent study of a special topic in world literatures and cultures. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 600V. Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Master's Thesis. May be repeated for degree credit.

WLIT 603V. Special Studies in Comparative Literature (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 6703. Psychoanalysis and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Readings of key tests in Psychoanalytic thought and cultural criticism including Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, Certeau, Zizek, and others. Selections of Psychoanalytic approaches to literature, film and gender and trauma studies.

WLIT 6713. Literature of Spain, 711-1615 C.E. (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examines the multiple cultural traditions of Spain between 711-1615 C.E. and train to produce scholarship pertinent to the field. Integrated approach includes English translations of literature originally in Arabic (50%+ of content), Hebrew, Spanish, French. Students with reading abilities in original languages encouraged to read original text.

WLIT 6803. Postcolonial Theory and Subaltern Studies (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Seminar examining the geopolitical (imperial, colonial and national) implications of knowledge and culture. Selected readings of early postcolonial texts by Cesaire, Fanon, and Fernandez Retamar, as well as more recent texts by Said, Spivak, Bhabha, Mignolo, Beverly and Chakrabarty among others. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 690V. Seminar (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

WLIT 700V. Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral Dissertation. May be repeated for degree credit.

Constance Bailey, Assistant Professor
M. Keith Booker, Professor
Geoffrey Arthur Brock, Professor
Sidney J. Burris, Professor
Joseph D. Candido, Professor
Robert Brady Cochran II, Professor
Geffrey Davis, Assistant Professor
Sean A. Dempsey, Assistant Professor
Elías Domínguez Barajas, Associate Professor
John Tabb DuVal, Professor
Ellen Louise Gilchrist, Clinical Professor
Michael Joseph Heffernan, Professor
Lisa Hinrichsen, Associate Professor
Toni Jensen, Assistant Professor
David Alton Jolliffe, Professor, Brown Chair in English Literacy
Mohja Kahf, Associate Professor
Casey Lee Kayser, Assistant Professor
Mary Beth Long, Visiting Assistant Professor
Susan M. Marren, Associate Professor
Davis McCombs, Associate Professor
Yajaira Padilla, Associate Professor
Adam Pope, Visiting Assistant Professor
William A. Quinn, Professor
Robin Roberts, Professor
Patrick Joseph Slattery, Associate Professor
Joshua Byron Smith, Assistant Professor
Dorothy Anne Stephens, Professor
Lissette López Szwydky-Davis, Assistant Professor
Sean Kicummah Teuton, Associate Professor
Padma Viswanathan, Assistant Professor
Kay Yandell, Assistant Professor