Donna L. Graham
Director
118 Human Environmental Sciences Building
479-575-6346
dgraham@uark.edu

Amanda Terrell
Graduate Coordinator
479-575-7538
amandat@uark.edu​

Human Environmental Sciences Website

Degree Conferred:
M.S. (HESC)

Areas of Study: Apparel merchandising and product development; food, human nutrition and hospitality management; human development and family sciences; and general human environmental sciences.

M.S. in Human Environmental Studies

Prerequisites to Degree Program: Applicants are expected to have sufficient undergraduate preparation to be admitted to the program. An admissions committee that is appointed by the Director at the time an application for admission is received determines eligibility for admission to any of the program areas. The admissions committee specifies any deficiencies in admission requirements that must be met by students who are admitted.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree: The School of Human Environmental Sciences requires that at least 50 percent of the course requirements be earned from courses at the 5000 or 6000 level. This degree allows for a thesis and non-thesis option. All students awarded a Graduate Assistantship are expected to complete the thesis option; students on AAES support are required to complete a thesis. The thesis option is also recommended for students who plan to continue their education beyond the Master of Science degree. There are three areas of concentration: Apparel Merchandising and Product Development; Food, Human Nutrition and Hospitality; and Human Development and Family Sciences.

Students should also be aware of Graduate School requirements with regard to master's degrees.

Thesis Option: The thesis option requires a minimum of 30 semester hours. Of those 30 hours, six semester hours of thesis research are required and it is expected that at least 12 hours of course work originates within the area of concentration.   Students must also take at least one course each in graduate statistics and research methods. 

Non-thesis Option: The non-thesis option is available for students in any concentration who are pursuing their degree through distance education. Students may take any or all of their courses online. The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 33 semester hours of graduate level course work. It is expected that a minimum of 15 of the semester hours originate in the student’s area of concentration.  Students must also take at least one course each in graduate statistics and research methods.  Non-thesis track students are required to pass both written and oral comprehensive exams. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with their advisers and the program website for the sequencing and availability of distance education courses offered by the School of Human Environmental Sciences.

Graduate Faculty

Apple, Laurie Marie McAlister, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University), M.S., B.S. (University of Arkansas), Associate Professor, 2000, 2007.
Becnel, Jennifer N., Ph.D. (Arizona State University), M.A. (University of California-San Francisco). B.A. (San Diego State University), Assistant Professor, 2014.
Cho, Eunjoo, Ph.D. (Iowa State University), M.S., B.S. (Hanyang University, Seoul), Associate Professor, 2013, 2019.
Fillastre, Michelle D., PH.D., M.S. (Louisiana State University), Instructor, 2020.
Fuller, Serena M., Ph.D. (University of California, Davis), Associate Professor, 2014.
Garrison, Mary Elizabeth, Ph.D., M.S. (Iowa State University), B.S. (Benedictine College), Professor, 2014.
Herold, Laura K., Ph.D., M.A. (University of Michigan), B.A. (Oberlin College), Teaching Assistant Professor, 2015.
Killian, Timothy Scott, Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Columbia), M.A. (Wheaton College), B.A. (Central Bible College), Associate Professor, 2001, 2007.
Ma, Weiyi, Ph.D, M.A. (University of Delaware), B.A. (China West Normal University), Assistant Professor, 2017.
McNally, Shelley Ann, Ph.D. (University of Toledo), M.S., B.S. (Ohio University), Professional Practice Assistant Professor, 2016.
Mosley, Jacquelyn Dee, Ph.D. (Texas Tech University), M.S. (Arizona State University), B.A. (University of Northern Iowa), Professor, 2021, 2016.
Moxley, Shari Coleman, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina), Instructor, 2013.
O'Brien, Catherine, Ph.D. (University of Illinois, Chicago), M.P.H. (San Diego State University), M.A. (University of California, San Diego), B.S.Ed. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Instructor, 2016.
Robertson, Lona, Ed.D. (Indiana University, Bloomington), M.S., B.S. (Florida State University), Professor, 2006, 2011.
Southward, Leigh, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (University of Tennessee), B.S. (Mississippi University for Women), Associate Professor, 2008.
Terrell, Amanda, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (Oklahoma State University), Assistant Professor, 2017.
Traywick, LaVona S., Ph.D. (University of Kentucky), M.A. (University of Arkansas-Little Rock), B.S. (University of Central Arkansas), Associate Professor, 2017.
Trudo, Sabrina P., Ph.D. (University of Washington), B.S. (Brigham Young University), Associate Professor, Twenty First Century Endowed Chair in Human Environmental Sciences, 2015.
Way, Kelly Ann, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (Oklahoma State University), Associate Professor, 2006, 2012.

Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Courses

AMPD 5003. Apparel Sourcing and Merchandising Systems in the Global Economy. 3 Hours.

Evaluation of key issues facing textiles and apparel supply chain businesses in the global economy considering economic, political, and social perspectives and professional implications. Lecture 3 hours. (Typically offered: Fall Odd Years)

AMPD 5023. Social, Psychological and Cultural Aspects of Dress. 3 Hours.

Integration of social, psychological and cultural theories as they apply to appearance and clothing behavior. Lecture 3 hours. (Typically offered: Fall Odd Years)

AMPD 5033. Issues and Trends in Textile Studies. 3 Hours.

Studies of advances in textile science and recent developments in the textile industry. Lecture 3 hours. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

AMPD 5043. Theories and Practices in Apparel Merchandising. 3 Hours.

Theoretical perspectives, concepts and current practices that influence apparel merchandising. Lecture 3 hours. (Typically offered: Spring Even Years)

AMPD 5063. Advanced Apparel Production. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4063 and AMPD 5063. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063 and AMPD 3003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5093. Apparel Merchandise Planning and Inventory Control. 3 Hours.

Describes today's challenges for both apparel manufacturers and retailers in meeting the consumer's demands for the right products at the right prices - and at the right times. Follows the evolution of the merchandising function with emphasis on production efficiency, highlighting the philosophies of industry executives and the effective integration of the merchandising, store design, marketing, the apparel supply chain and manufacturing functions along the way. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4093 and AMPD 5093. Prerequisite: AMPD 3033. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5103. Evolution of Fashion and Society Through Television Media. 3 Hours.

This course uses television programming from its early beginnings in the 1930s through to the twenty-first century to trace major events, societal changes, and the associated evolution of fashion. The course examines television both as an innovator and diffuser of fashion trends. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4103 and AMPD 5103. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5223. Merchandising Application for the Apparel Industry. 3 Hours.

Application of merchandising theory, principles and practices in a capstone class. An in depth study of innovative apparel business concepts as applied to manufacturers and retailers of apparel including apparel classification, seasonal cycles, stock emphasis, assortment strategies, target customers, and apparel trends. Includes an overview of marketing communication including advertising, personal selling, and sales promotion. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4023 and AMPD 5223. Prerequisite: AMPD 3033 and AMPD 3043. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5233L. Computer Aided Textile Design. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students advanced skills in textile design using industry based computer aided design (CAD) software. Lab 4 hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4033 and AMPD 5233L. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033 and AMPD 2053. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5253. Historic and Contemporary Apparel. 3 Hours.

This course traces the evolution of clothing from ancient times to the twentieth century with emphasis upon Western civilization and includes the study of contemporary fashion as a social force including the origin, scope, theory, and history of the fashion business, the materials of fashion, the fashion producers, auxiliary fashion enterprises, designers, fashion leaders, and leading market. Cultural and economic factors affecting dress, adornment and customs associated dress will be stressed. The Lecture 3 hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4053 and AMPD 5253. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 5901. AMPD Pre-Study Tour. 1 Hour.

A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for AMPD 591V AMPD Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. AMPD 5901 is content specific to each AMPD 591V study tour and must be repeated for each study tour destination. A grade of "C" or better is required to participate in AMPD 591V. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both AMPD 4901 and AMPD 5901. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. AMPD majors with minimum 30 hours, or consent. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 5912. AMPD Study Tour. 2 Hours.

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. (Typically offered: Summer) May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

Hospitality Courses

HOSP 5643. Meetings and Convention Management. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the planning and management of meetings and conventions in the hospitality industry. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 5653. Global Travel and Tourism Management. 3 Hours.

The course recounts the history of travel, explores the future, and discusses the components of tourism from a global perspective. (Typically offered: Spring)

HOSP 5663. Critical Issues and Trends in Hospitality and Tourism. 3 Hours.

The hospitality industry is arguably one of the most important sources of income and foreign exchange and is growing rapidly. However, national and international crises have huge negative economic consequences. This course explores change in the world and applies this to forecasting change in the hospitality and tourism industries. This course examines the current state of the industry and makes educated predictions to the future of the lodging, cruise, restaurant, technology, and travel and tourism industries. (Typically offered: Spring)

HOSP 5673. Destination Marketing and Operations. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the tasks and processes involved in running a successful destination of management organization (DMO). This course places heavy emphasis on destination marketing. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 5693. Hospitality Management Internship. 3 Hours.

Supervised experience in an instructor approved work /learning situation relating to the hospitality industry in multiple aspects of a hospitality organization. Emphasis on application of knowledge and skills to actual job roles and responsibilities. Requires employment in a hospitality setting for a minimum of 250 clock hours. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

Human Development and Family Sciences Courses

HDFS 5013. Field Experience in Gerontology. 3 Hours.

Supervised research/practical experience in field setting. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HDFS 5023. Critical Issues in Aging. 3 Hours.

Consideration of current issues of aging not covered in depth in other courses. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HDFS 5403. Family Theories and Methods. 3 Hours.

this course is an introduction to graduate study in families. The course focuses on historical and contemporary family theories and research methods that have influenced research on families. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5413. Adult Development. 3 Hours.

The course covers physical, cognitive, social, and personal dimensions of adult development. The information is presented from a lifespan developmental framework which encompasses (a) a multidisciplinary perspective, (b) consideration of the impact of prior development on late life as well as socio-historical influences (c) recognition of individual differences among older persons,and (d) concern for promoting optimal functioning. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5423. Theories of Human Development. 3 Hours.

Classic and contemporary theories and theoretical issues concerning human development across the life span. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Fall Even Years)

HDFS 5433. Advanced Studies in Child Development. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of issues in development during infancy, early, and middle childhood. Developmental theory and accomplishments/milestones are studied in the biocultural context. Emphasis is on review and analysis of classic and recent research literature and on evaluation of theoretical perspectives based on research evidence. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5443. Gerontology. 3 Hours.

Examines physiological and psychological development of the aging individual, extended family relationships, service networks for older adults, and retirement activities. Some attention given to housing and care needs of persons in advanced years. Lecture 3 hours per week, seminar format. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5453. Aging in the Family. 3 Hours.

This course considers theories and research on personal and family transitions and experiences in mid to late life that impact individuals and their family relationships. Applied assignments address these same issues. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5463. Administration and Leadership in the Helping Professions. 3 Hours.

Planning, developing, operating, and evaluating programs in the helping professions, including child care and family-related agencies. Emphasis will be on administrators' roles as leaders in organizations. Topics include facilities, budget, staff development, and policy manuals. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 5473. Cognitive Health. 3 Hours.

Cognitive skills form the foundation for functioning in everyday life and these skills take on added importance in older adulthood. This course focuses on selected theoretical approaches and current research related to cognitive aging. We will review normative and non-normative cognitive changes, assessment techniques, and prevention/intervention efforts. Throughout the course we will keep the role of environment and lifespan implications in the forefront of our discussion. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Summer Odd Years)

HDFS 5483. Creativity and Aging. 3 Hours.

What happens to creativity as a person ages? This unique class will help students to understand developmental and pathological changes in the brain that can lead to changes in creative output over time. Through hands-on experiences and direct association with older adults, students will grow an appreciation for creativity produced and inspired by older people. This course is intended to provide experiences that will help the student to be able to create art programs for older adults. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Summer)

HDFS 5493. Environments and Aging. 3 Hours.

Designing for aging is big business. The older population of the U.S. is increasing in numbers, and lives in more varied kinds of housing, from single family homes to specially designed residential units for people experiencing dementia. This course uses interdisciplinary perspectives in an on-line web-based format to explore the preferences and needs of older adults and the attributes of various physical environments that enhance their lives. Students apply this knowledge to the design and management of housing, institutional facilities, neighborhoods, and communities. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5593. Public Policy Advocacy for Children and Families. 3 Hours.

Public policy advocacy as related to children and family issues. Strategies for advocacy will be emphasized. Lecture three hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both HDFS 4493 and HDFS 5593. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 5603. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

The course provides a social perspective on environmental issues. It examines the linkage between society, ecological systems and the physical environment. It provides conceptual framework(s) for analyzing environmental issues, considers the role of humans in environmental issues, and enhances understanding the complexity of the relationship between societal organization and environmental change. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both HDFS 4603 and HDFS 5603. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 5603.

HDFS 5773. Advanced Studies in Family Science. 3 Hours.

An in-depth examination of patterns and trends in families; adaptive responses in families in light of environmental, economic, political, social and technological changes. Emphasis is on the evaluation of classic, recent and emergent research literature. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 5803. Gender and Aging. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to expose students to an overview of conceptual and applied issues related to how women age. Instead of focusing exclusively on women, this course will focus on women and men in order to understand the dynamic role of gender for the aging process. Students will be introduced to current theoretical and empirical work on the intersections between gender and aging. Using both life course and lifespan perspectives; biological, social, and behavioral aspects of human development and aging will be examined with respect to gender differences and similarities. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Summer Even Years)

HDFS 5823. Mental Health and Aging. 3 Hours.

This is an advanced level course in Mental Health and Aging. The student will be introduced to the range of issues involved in this subject utilizing several theoretical perspectives within an overall systems framework. The major emotional, mental, and psychiatric problems encountered in old age will be examined along with the normal processes of the aging individual's personality, mental and brain functions. Common interventions and treatments available will be explored, as well as the consequences of no or inappropriate services. Challenges and barriers on the macro and micro systems levels will be presented with implications for the future of this field. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 5843. Physical Health and Nutrition in Aging. 3 Hours.

This course identifies the basic physiological changes during aging and their impacts in health and disease. The focus will be on successful aging with special emphasis on physical activity and nutrition. Practical application to community settings is addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

Human Environmental Sciences Courses

HESC 500V. Special Problems. 1-6 Hour.

Special problems. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both HESC 400V and HESC 500V. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC 502V. Special Problems Research. 1-6 Hour.

Individual study or research for graduates in the field of human environmental sciences. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HESC 5053. Survey Design and Scale Development. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide the expertise required to design and conduct survey research. Students will understand the instruments (scales/questionnaire) used in data collection processes and acquire the statistical skills necessary to develop and test these survey instruments. This course uses both theory and practice. Hands-on training will be provided via SPSS package for data analyses, and Qualtrics will be used for web-based surveys. Prerequisite: 3 hours of graduate-level statistics coursework and HESC 5463 or AGED 5463 or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with AGED 5493.

HESC 5111. Introduction to Graduate Program. 1 Hour.

Overview of graduate program in the School of Human Environmental Sciences. 1 hour. Topics include master's program requirements; graduate student responsibilities; timetable for academic year; forms and deadlines; scheduling and time management; library searches; fundamentals of writing literature reviews; quantitative, qualitative, and mixed research methods; secondary data analyses; and tips for research presentations. Prerequisite: Departmental Consent. (Typically offered: Fall)

HESC 5463. Research Methodology in Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Logical structure and the method of science. Basic elements of research design; observation, measurement, analytic method, interpretation, verification, presentation of results. Applications to research in the economic and sociological problems of agriculture and Human Environmental Sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with AGED 5463.

HESC 555V. Special Topics in Human Environmental Sciences. 1-3 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in the specializations of human environmental sciences. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

HESC 600V. Master's Thesis. 1-6 Hour.

Master's Thesis. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for degree credit.

HESC 700V. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral Dissertation. Prerequisite: Candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for degree credit.

Nutrition Courses

NUTR 5103. Nutrition Research Design and Methodology. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on topics such as nutrition research terminology, nutritional epidemiology methods, and experimental scientific methods, technologies, and issues involved in understanding and conducting studies on the relationship between human diet and disease. Evaluation of experimental scientific methods include problem identification, research design, preparation and evaluation of experimental research results and outcomes including techniques in the areas of physiology and biochemistry as related to nutrition and metabolism. This course also helps students refine their scientific writing and presentation skills, and introduces hypothesis and proposal development in the nutritional sciences. Prerequisite: Graduate students only. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 5113. Advanced Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Normal nutrition with emphasis on utilization of nutrients. Lecture and reports on current literature 3 hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both NUTR 4213 and NUTR 5113. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813 and NUTR 3203. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 521V. Readings in Nutrition. 1-6 Hour.

Seminar and individual study. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (Typically offered: Irregular)

NUTR 5223. Nutrition During the Life Cycle. 3 Hours.

Study of normal nutrition emphasizing quantitative needs for nutrients as functions of biologic processes that vary during stages of the life cycle. Nutritive needs during pregnancy and childhood are emphasized with some attention to nourishing aging and elderly adults. Factors that affect food choices and eating behavior are also considered. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 5243. Community Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Identifying, assessing, and developing solutions for nutritional problems encountered at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 hours per week. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both NUTR 4243 and NUTR 5243. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 5263. Medical Nutrition Therapy I. 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 5273. Medical Nutrition Therapy II. 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on the Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 5263. (Typically offered: Spring)