Susan Patton 
Director
Eleanor Mann School of Nursing
Epley Center for Health Professions
606 Razorback Road
479-575-3904
Email: nursing@uark.edu 

Eleanor Mann School of Nursing website

Degrees Conferred:
M.S. in Nursing (NURS)
Doctor of Nursing Practice (NURS)

The Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) Program: The program offered by the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing expands on the philosophy of the undergraduate nursing program and contributes to the mission of the College of Education and Health Professions and the University of Arkansas. Graduates of the M.S.N. are prepared to contribute to the nursing profession through the application of knowledge and skills in  leadership, education, and clinical practice. Completion of the M.S.N. program provides the foundation for academic progression to a research or practice-focused doctoral program.

Graduates of the M.S.N. program will be able to:

  • Promote evidence-based practice through problem identification and the critique of research findings
  • Collaborate in policy development, resource management, and cost-effective care delivery
  • Apply legal/ethical principles to promote a values-based professional practice
  • Affect health care outcomes through advanced roles of clinician, teacher, manager, researcher, and consultant
  • Utilize theories from nursing and other disciplines for decision making
  • Advocate for access to quality health care for diverse populations
  • Collaborate with other disciplines to design, deliver and evaluate health care services for diverse populations
  • Provide leadership in education in a variety of clinical and academic settings

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program: The program provides the terminal degree for nurses who will assume leadership roles as practitioners or specialists in the field of nursing.  There are two entry levels for students:  1) post completion of the baccalaureate degree in nursing and licensure as a registered nurse (RN), or 2) post completion of a master's degree in nursing that has resulted in national certification as an advanced practice nurse (nurse practitioner, clinical nurse specialist, nurse midwife, or nurse anesthetist).  The online program is built upon the standards set forth by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's Essentials of Doctoral Education for Advanced Nursing Practice (2006), and incorporates specialty standards of the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Competencies (2004) and the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (2009).  As such, students completing the B.S.N. to D.N.P. program of study will be eligible to sit for the adult-geriatric acute care nurse practitioner (ACNP), the adult/geriatric clinical nurse specialist (CNS), or the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP)  certification exam offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) based on the concentration completed. Students in both entry levels must complete a D.N.P. project and a minimum of 1,000 clinical hours while enrolled in a graduate program.  Current advanced practice nurses who enter the program as post-master's students must complete clinical hours to supplement clinical hours completed in their master's program.  A variety of distance learning methods will be used to expedite clinical requirements.  However, students should anticipate several visits to the main campus during their program of study.

Upon completion of the program, graduates will be able to:

  • Evaluate and utilize advanced knowledge and theories from nursing and related disciplines to solve complex health issues for individuals, aggregates, populations, and systems.
  • Design, implement and evaluate strategies that promote and sustain quality improvement at the organizational and policy levels.
  • Provide leadership in the transformation of health care through intra-professional collaboration, application of technology, and policy development.
  • Incorporate evidence-based clinical prevention and health services for individuals, aggregates, and populations.
  • Demonstrate clinical expertise, systems thinking, and accountability in designing, delivering, and evaluating evidence-based care to improve patient outcomes.

Primary Areas of Faculty Research: Job satisfaction, recruiting and retaining nursing faculty; cooperative testing; diversity and high-risk populations, student success, emotional intelligence; patient teaching and safety in the healthcare environment; advanced practice nurses’ work environments, their interface among rural and underserved populations, and their impact on health care outcomes; fall prevention in community dwelling older adults; oral health; mobility in older adults; preventing falls in the acute care setting; transitional care; nursing education best practices; care giver issues in older adults with dementia; cultural and behavioral factors of obesity; health behaviors in children, nutrition beliefs and practices, executive function, motivational factors, cultural beliefs; research affecting the pediatric population; migrant childhood health; lactation assessment and education; infant immune system research; minority population and education; education and cultural evaluation among nursing students; infant feeding; childhood obesity; hematology; oncology; smoking cessation; improving outcomes in trauma care; rib Score and Protocol Pain management strategies in critical care; IA joint injection protocol development; CAMP Scores to measure trauma systems in US; CAMP scores to compare trauma systems in US to Brazil; pediatric autism spectrum disorders: Increasing evidence-based care in primary care clinics; promoting NP practice in Arkansas; higher education and primary/secondary level student issues/concerns; obesity; PCORI; community-engaged research; diabetes; patient/family health education; mental health; implementation of a protocol for screening at-risk walk-in clinic patients for diabetes.

Requirements for M.S.N. in Nursing

The Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) Program offered by the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing expands on the philosophy of the undergraduate nursing program and contributes to the mission of the College of Education and Health Professions and the University of Arkansas. Graduates of the M.S.N. are prepared to contribute to the nursing profession through the application of knowledge and skills in  leadership, education, and clinical practice. Completion of the M.S.N. program provides the foundation for academic progression to a research or practice-focused doctoral program.

Admission Requirements for the Master of Science in Nursing Degree Program 

  • Admission to the University of Arkansas Graduate School (Requires a $60 non-refundable application fee)
  • Admission to the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing MSN program (requires a $40 application fee)
  • Completion of a nationally accredited professional degree program in nursing
  • A 3.0 cumulative GPA on the last 60 credit hours of attempted coursework in previous nursing program
  • Current unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse
  • Submission of official GRE scores taken within five years and indicating capacity for master’s level work
  • Submission of curriculum vitae or professional resume  
  • Completion of candidate interview
  • Two letters of recommendation, one from a faculty member and one from an employer
  • Qualified applicants will be admitted on a space available basis
  • Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be referred to the Graduate Admissions Committee for special consideration and may be required to fulfill additional prerequisites.

Progression Requirements for the Master of Science in Nursing Degree

Students are responsible for meeting the standards of academic and professional performance specified by the graduate programs in nursing. In order to progress in the program, students must adhere to the following:

  • Grade requirements as outlined below
  • Policies of the University of Arkansas Graduate School are on the Objectives and Regulations page.
  • Clinical Practice Guidelines as outlined in the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook in the Graduate Handbook.
  • Clinical Compliance Guidelines as outlined in the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing Graduate Student Handbook also in the Graduate Handbook.
  • Maintenance of an unencumbered registered nurse license
  • Compliance with the nurse practice act(s) which regulate(s) the student’s license(s)

Grade Requirements

  1. A grade of “C” or lower may be earned in a nursing course only once.
  2. A grade of “B” or better must be received upon repeat of the nursing course in order to progress in the program; courses may only be repeated once to achieve a grade of “B” or higher.
  3. If a second “C” or lower is earned in a nursing course, the student will not be allowed to progress in the program, and will not be allowed to return to the program.
  4. A student may only repeat a nursing course in which a “C” or lower has been received one time throughout the program. A student may only withdraw from a course one time.
  5. Grades of “D” or “F” are not accepted for credit.

D.N.P. with Family Nurse Practitioner Concentration

Program Requirements: In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, students who have earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing must complete a minimum of 78 hours with the following general requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice, while completing additional coursework in the Family Nurse Practitioner concentration. Several campus visits are required for program orientation, skills acquisition, and dissemination of scholarly work. 

Admission Requirements and Procedures

  • Admission to the University of Arkansas Graduate School (Requires a $60 non-refundable application fee)
  • Admission to the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing DNP program (requires a $40 application fee)
  • Completion of a nationally accredited professional degree program in nursing
  • A 3.0 cumulative GPA on the last 60 credit hours of attempted coursework in previous nursing program
  • Current unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse
  • Submission of official GRE scores taken within 5 years and indicating capacity for doctoral-level work
  • Submission of curriculum vitae or professional resume  
  • Completion of candidate interview
  • Two letters of recommendation, one from a faculty member and one from an employer
  • Additional Requirements for master’s-prepared Advanced Practice Registered Nurse applicants:
    • Completion of a Master's Degree in Nursing from a nationally accredited M.S.N. program
    • A.P.N. licensure – if required by student's state of residence
    • Certification as an A.P.N.
  • Qualified applicants will be admitted on a space available basis
  • Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be referred to the Graduate Admissions Committee for special consideration and may be required to fulfill additional prerequisites.

Progression Requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree:

Students are responsible for meeting the standards of academic and professional performance specified by the graduate programs in nursing. In order to progress in the program, students must adhere to the following:

Grade Requirement

A. A grade of “C” or lower may be earned in a nursing course only once, with the following exception:

  1. A grade of “B” or better must be earned in didactic courses with a clinical component.
  2. If a grade less than “B” is earned in either the didactic or clinical course, both must be repeated concurrently. A grade of “B” or better must be received upon repeat of the course in order to progress in the program.
  3. Clinical courses and their didactic components may only be repeated once to achieve a grade of “B” or higher.

B. If a second “C” or lower is earned in a nursing course, the student will not be allowed to progress in the program, and will not be allowed to return to the program.

C. A student may only repeat a nursing course in which a “C” or lower has been received one time throughout the program. A student may only withdraw from a course one time.

D. Grades of “D” or “F” are not accepted for credit.

Required Courses for All D.N.P. Students
NURS 5063Health Care Policy3
NURS 5523Healthcare Informatics3
NURS 6123Evaluation Methods and Translational Research for Evidence-based Practice3
NURS 6224DNP Clinical Practicum I (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6233Healthcare Economics and Finance3
NURS 6244DNP Clinical Practicum II (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6263Organization Management and Systems Leadership3
NURS 628VDNP Clinical Practicum III3
NURS 7122DNP Project Implementation I2
NURS 7142DNP Project Implementation II2
NURS 6343Analytic Methods and Epidemiology for Health Care3
NURS 5403Scholarly Writing3
ESRM 5393Statistics in Education and Health Professions3

Additional Requirements for Family Nurse Practitioner Concentration 

Required courses for all B.S.N.-D.N.P. students:
NURS 5033Scientific Foundations and Role Development in Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 5043Concepts of Health Promotion Within Diverse Populations3
NURS 5053Evidence-Based Practice and Innovation in Nursing3
NURS 5101Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning1
NURS 5112Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning Clinical Practicum2
NURS 5123Pharmacotherapeutics3
NURS 5143Advanced Pathophysiology3
Required Family Nurse Practitioner Courses
NURS 5483Common Problems in Primary Care3
NURS 5495Common Problems in Primary Care Clinical Practicum5
NURS 5543Primary Care of Children3
NURS 5683Primary Care of Children Clinical Practicum3
NURS 5873Complex Problems in Primary Care3
NURS 5884Complex Problems in Primary Care Clinical Practicum4

D.N.P. with Adult-Gerontology Acute-Care Nurse Practitioner Concentration

Program Requirements: In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, students who have earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing must complete a minimum of 78 hours with the following general requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice, while completing additional coursework in the Adult-Gerontology Acute-Care Nurse Practitioner concentration. Several campus visits are required for program orientation, skills acquisition, and dissemination of scholarly work.  

Admission Requirements and Procedures

  • Admission to the University of Arkansas Graduate School (Requires a $60 non-refundable application fee)
  • Admission to the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing DNP program (requires a $40 application fee)
  • Completion of a nationally accredited professional degree program in nursing
  • A 3.0 cumulative GPA on the last 60 credit hours of attempted coursework in previous nursing program
  • Current unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse
  • Submission of official GRE scores taken within 5 years and indicating capacity for doctoral-level work
  • Submission of curriculum vitae or professional resume  
  • Completion of candidate interview
  • Two letters of recommendation, one from a faculty member and one from an employer
  • Additional Requirements for master’s-prepared Advanced Practice Registered Nurse applicants:
    • Completion of a Master's Degree in Nursing from a nationally accredited M.S.N. program
    • A.P.N. licensure – if required by student's state of residence
    • Certification as an A.P.N.
  • Qualified applicants will be admitted on a space available basis
  • Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be referred to the Graduate Admissions Committee for special consideration and may be required to fulfill additional prerequisites.

Progression Requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree:

Students are responsible for meeting the standards of academic and professional performance specified by the graduate programs in nursing. In order to progress in the program, students must adhere to the following:

Grade Requirement

A. A grade of “C” or lower may be earned in a nursing course only once, with the following exception:

  1. A grade of “B” or better must be earned in didactic courses with a clinical component.
  2. If a grade less than “B” is earned in either the didactic or clinical course, both must be repeated concurrently. A grade of “B” or better must be received upon repeat of the course in order to progress in the program.
  3. Clinical courses and their didactic components may only be repeated once to achieve a grade of “B” or higher.

B. If a second “C” or lower is earned in a nursing course, the student will not be allowed to progress in the program, and will not be allowed to return to the program.

C. A student may only repeat a nursing course in which a “C” or lower has been received one time throughout the program. A student may only withdraw from a course one time.

D. Grades of “D” or “F” are not accepted for credit.

Required Courses for All D.N.P. Students
NURS 5063Health Care Policy3
NURS 5523Healthcare Informatics3
NURS 6123Evaluation Methods and Translational Research for Evidence-based Practice3
NURS 6224DNP Clinical Practicum I (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6233Healthcare Economics and Finance3
NURS 6244DNP Clinical Practicum II (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6263Organization Management and Systems Leadership3
NURS 628VDNP Clinical Practicum III3
NURS 7122DNP Project Implementation I2
NURS 7142DNP Project Implementation II2
NURS 6343Analytic Methods and Epidemiology for Health Care3
NURS 5403Scholarly Writing3
ESRM 5393Statistics in Education and Health Professions3

 Additional Requirements for Adult-Geriatric Acute-Care Nurse Practitioner Concentration

Required courses for all B.S.N.-D.N.P. students:
NURS 5033Scientific Foundations and Role Development in Advanced Practice Nursing3
NURS 5043Concepts of Health Promotion Within Diverse Populations3
NURS 5053Evidence-Based Practice and Innovation in Nursing3
NURS 5101Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning1
NURS 5112Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning Clinical Practicum2
NURS 5123Pharmacotherapeutics3
NURS 5143Advanced Pathophysiology3
Required Adult Gerontology Acute-Care Nurse Practitioner Courses
NURS 5463Acute and Critical Illness in Adult and Gerontology Populations3
NURS 5475Acute and Critical Illness in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum5
NURS 5434Common Problems in Acute Care in Adult and Gerontology Populations4
NURS 5332Common Problems in Acute Care in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum2
NURS 5443Chronic Health Problems in Adult and Gerontology Populations3
NURS 5454Chronic Health Problems in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum4

Post-M.S.N. Doctor of Nursing Practice

Program Requirements:  In addition to the general requirements of the Graduate School, students who have earned a clinical Master of Science in Nursing degree must complete a minimum of 42 hours with the following requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice.  Several campus visits may be required for program orientation and dissemination of scholarly work.

Admission Requirements and Procedures

  • Admission to the University of Arkansas Graduate School (Requires a $60 non-refundable application fee)
  • Admission to the Eleanor Mann School of Nursing DNP program (requires a $40 application fee)
  • Completion of a nationally accredited professional degree program in nursing
  • A 3.0 cumulative GPA on the last 60 credit hours of attempted coursework in previous nursing program
  • Current unencumbered license to practice as a registered nurse
  • Submission of official GRE scores taken within 5 years and indicating capacity for doctoral-level work
  • Submission of curriculum vitae or professional resume  
  • Completion of candidate interview
  • Two letters of recommendation, one from a faculty member and one from an employer
  • Additional Requirements for master’s-prepared Advanced Practice Registered Nurse applicants:
    • Completion of a Master's Degree in Nursing from a nationally accredited M.S.N. program
    • A.P.N. licensure – if required by student's state of residence
    • Certification as an A.P.N.
  • Qualified applicants will be admitted on a space available basis
  • Applicants who do not meet the above requirements may be referred to the Graduate Admissions Committee for special consideration and may be required to fulfill additional prerequisites.

Progression Requirements for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree:

Students are responsible for meeting the standards of academic and professional performance specified by the graduate programs in nursing. In order to progress in the program, students must adhere to the following:

Grade Requirement

A. A grade of “C” or lower may be earned in a nursing course only once, with the following exception:

  1. A grade of “B” or better must be earned in didactic courses with a clinical component.
  2. If a grade less than “B” is earned in either the didactic or clinical course, both must be repeated concurrently. A grade of “B” or better must be received upon repeat of the course in order to progress in the program.
  3. Clinical courses and their didactic components may only be repeated once to achieve a grade of “B” or higher.

B. If a second “C” or lower is earned in a nursing course, the student will not be allowed to progress in the program, and will not be allowed to return to the program.

C. A student may only repeat a nursing course in which a “C” or lower has been received one time throughout the program. A student may only withdraw from a course one time.

D. Grades of “D” or “F” are not accepted for credit.

Required Courses for All D.N.P. Students
NURS 5063Health Care Policy3
NURS 5523Healthcare Informatics3
NURS 6123Evaluation Methods and Translational Research for Evidence-based Practice3
NURS 6224DNP Clinical Practicum I (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6233Healthcare Economics and Finance3
NURS 6244DNP Clinical Practicum II (180 contact hours)4
NURS 6263Organization Management and Systems Leadership3
NURS 628VDNP Clinical Practicum III3
NURS 7122DNP Project Implementation I2
NURS 7142DNP Project Implementation II2
NURS 6343Analytic Methods and Epidemiology for Health Care3
NURS 5403Scholarly Writing3
ESRM 5393Statistics in Education and Health Professions3

Requirements for Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education

Program Description: This Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education program will prepare the next generation of nurse educators for the role in academic settings. Students augment their existing Master’s preparation in the clinical setting with knowledge and skills to function as qualified nursing educators ready for the demands of the academic setting. The students completing this certificate fill the needs of nursing education programs across the country at all levels. The program is offered 100% online.

Program Requirements: The semester of entry can be spring, summer, or fall. The courses listed below must be completed. The NURS 5343 Specialty Development I (Teaching Practicum) course will be the last course in the sequence. Students opting to enroll beginning fall or summer will be required to take only NURS 5073 in the fall (not NURS 5343) followed by one course each semester with completion the following fall. Students entering in spring will complete NURS 5093 first, followed by NURS 5083 in the summer and NURS 5073 and NURS 5343 in the fall. 

NURS 5073Curriculum Design and Development in Nursing Education3
NURS 5083Methods of Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education3
NURS 5093Instructional Design and Delivery in Nursing Education3
NURS 5343Specialty Development I3
Total Hours12

Graduate Faculty

Courses

NURS 5003. Theoretical and Scientific Foundations for Nursing Practice. 3 Hours.

The course utilizes the critical reasoning process to examine the element of nursing knowledge. Emphasis is placed on concept analysis and the evaluation of nursing theories. Identification of the links between theory and empirical indicators is examined. The clinical relevance of mid-range and practice theories is explored. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5033. Scientific Foundations and Role Development in Advanced Practice Nursing. 3 Hours.

Examines development of the advanced practice nursing role and evolution of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Concepts include scientific foundations of practice, role development, interdisciplinary collaborative strategies, advanced scope of practice, patient advocacy, and legal/ethical principles in the advanced practice role. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5043. Concepts of Health Promotion Within Diverse Populations. 3 Hours.

Provides a theoretical base for health promotion, risk reduction and disease prevention at the individual, family and community levels. A cross-disciplinary approach to achieve or preserve health is identified. Focuses on holistic plans and interventions that address the behavioral and social factors that contribute to morbidity and mortality in diverse populations. Provides opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate health promotion interventions for selected clients. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5053. Evidence-Based Practice and Innovation in Nursing. 3 Hours.

Examines models and strategies for leadership in evidence-based practice and innovation, outcomes management, and translational scholarship. The emphasis of this course is on problem identification, information retrieval, critical appraisal, and synthesis of a body of evidence. It provides the student with the foundation for MSN and DNP evidence-based projects. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5063. Health Care Policy. 3 Hours.

Provides knowledge and understanding needed to participate in policy development analysis and implementation. Provides and overview of the political process, health care policy, advocacy, leadership roles, legislative and regulatory issues, health care financing, and evaluating outcomes. Access, cost, and quality of health care are major foci in this course. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 5073. Curriculum Design and Development in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course provides the essential elements that define and operationalize the process of curriculum design and development. Students will examine curriculum theories, models, and concepts from the perspective of nursing education. They will analyze factors that influence program and curriculum development. Historical and philosophical foundations of nursing practice and educational principles are examined. The application and synthesis of curriculum theory and their application to nursing is emphasized. The role of the educator in the dynamic relationship between the practice setting, research, and curriculum is examined. Students will participate in the design of curriculum which reflects professional nursing practice, standards, theory, and research.Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program or departmental consent. Completion of all general and research core classes or approval of the MSN Education Program Coordinator. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NURS 5083. Methods of Assessment and Evaluation in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course is one of four offered in the nursing education concentration in preparation for the role of educator in academic and clinical settings. Students explore theories, models, and evidence for best practice in assessing learning - including constructing exam items and creating tools for assessing writing assignments. Students discuss grading and other concepts related to assessment and evaluation as it relates to nursing education. Pre- or Corequisite: Completion of NURS 5073 or NURS 5093. Prerequisite: Admission to the Masters of Science in Nursing or the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 5093. Instructional Design and Delivery in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

This course is one of four offered in the nursing education concentration in preparation for the role of educator in academic and clinical settings. Students explore teaching and learning theories and other evidence to guide practice in the advanced role of the educator. Students gain competencies in the knowledge and skills necessary for delivering evidence-based teaching and learning strategies in a variety of learning environments. Prerequisite: Admission to the Graduate Program or departmental consent. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5101. Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning. 1 Hour.

Applies health assessment, physical examination techniques, clinical decision making, and diagnostic reasoning to formulate a culturally-sensitive, individualized plan of care, which includes health promotion and disease prevention. Corequisite: NURS 5112. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5112. Advanced Health Assessment and Diagnostic Reasoning Clinical Practicum. 2 Hours.

Focus is on the application of clinical decision making, diagnostic reasoning, and advanced physical examination techniques to develop differential diagnoses, problem list, and a plan of care for individual clients. Corequisite: NURS 5101. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5123. Pharmacotherapeutics. 3 Hours.

Provides advanced concepts and application of pharmacology for broad categories of agents used in disease management. Establishes the relationship between pharmacologic agents and physiologic/pathologic responses. It assists students with the development of knowledge and skills to prescribe and manage a client's health in a safe, high quality, and cost-effective manner. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5143. Advanced Pathophysiology. 3 Hours.

Provides a comprehensive understanding of normal physiologic and pathologic mechanisms of disease that serves as a foundation for clinical assessment, decision making, and management of individuals. Includes mechanisms of disease, genetic susceptibility, and immune responses in selected disorders. This course includes concepts of pathophysiology across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5272. Clinical Practicum: Interpretive Diagnostic Reasoning. 2 Hours.

Application of principles of pathologic mechanisms of disease, pharmacotherapeutics, and pharmacokinetics to refine and synthesize skills for history taking, physical examination, clinical assessment, diagnostic reasoning, and decision making for adult and geriatric individuals. Pre- or Corequisite: NURS 5101, NURS 5112, NURS 5143 and NURS 5123. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 5303. Foundations of Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

Considers the principles, philosophies, theories, and strategies of teaching, learning, and evaluation needed in nursing education. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5313. Curriculum and Evaluation in Nursing Education. 3 Hours.

Considers knowledge and skills needed for curriculum and program development and evaluation for a variety of nursing education settings. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 5323. Teaching in Nursing Practicum. 3 Hours.

Supervised experience in the nurse educator role in both classroom and clinical settings. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5332. Common Problems in Acute Care in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum. 2 Hours.

Focuses on the management of adult-gerontology patients with common acute illnesses. Emphasizes the application of principles of pathologic mechanisms of disease, history taking, physical examination, and clinical decision making. Corequisite: NURS 5434. Prerequisite: NURS 5101 and NURS 5112. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5343. Specialty Development I. 3 Hours.

This course will include two foci. There will be readings focused on current topics in a specialty area. A focused field experience will allow student to integrate knowledge and skills in a specialty area of nursing in preparation for the nurse educator role. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5353. Specialty Development II. 3 Hours.

Building on the Independent Study: Specialty Development I, this course will include two foci. There will be readings focused on current topics in a specialty area. A focused field experience will allow student to integrate knowledge and skills in a specialty area of nursing in preparation for the nurse educator role. Prerequisite: NURS 5343. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5403. Scholarly Writing. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on the fundamentals of academic writing at the graduate level with the goal of honing students' critical reading and writing skills. Attention will be given to mechanics, usage, and style, as well as to handling and citing sources. The emphasis throughout is on creative thinking and precise, scholarly writing. Prerequisite: Completion of a baccalaureate degree and acceptance into the graduate program. (Typically offered: Fall and Summer)

NURS 5413. Executive Leadership in Nursing. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the health care structures and processes, human capital management, health and public policy, communication principles and styles, negotiations, leadership effectiveness, strategic visioning, ethics and advocacy, and innovation. Learning will enable the professional nurse executive to lead complex health care environments applying an advanced skill set in each of the focus areas. Prerequisite: NURS 5403, NURS 5523, NURS 5043, NURS 5053, NURS 5063, MBAD 5241, HRWD 5233, NURS 6233, ESRM 6403. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5423. Health Systems Operations. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the complex practice environment. Enables the professional nurse leader to demonstrate knowledge of care management and delivery, professional practice environment and models, and quality monitoring and improvement. Professional practice and health care delivery models and settings, role delineation, laws and regulations, accreditation, and professional practice standards will be emphasized. Prerequisite: NURS 5403, NURS 5523, NURS 5043, NURS 5053, NURS 5063, MBAD 5241, HRWD 5233, NURS 6233, ESRM 6403. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5434. Common Problems in Acute Care in Adult and Gerontology Populations. 4 Hours.

Examine principles of pathologic mechanisms of disease, refine skills for history taking, physical examination, and clinical decision making for adult and geriatric individuals with common acute illnesses. Corequisite: NURS 5443. Prerequisite: NURS 5101 and NURS 5112. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5443. Chronic Health Problems in Adult and Gerontology Populations. 3 Hours.

Explores evidence-based models for the management of selected chronic conditions, focusing on assessment and treatment of individuals and families. Utilizes advanced theories, concepts, knowledge, and skill in the care of diverse adult and geriatric populations with complex chronic health problems. Corequisite: NURS 5454. Prerequisite: Completion of NURS 5434 and NURS 5332. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5454. Chronic Health Problems in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the management of adult-gerontology populations with complex, chronic health problems. Emphasis is on the application of theoretical concepts, assessment skills, clinical decision making, and evidence-based standards to formulate diagnoses, clinical impressions, treatment, and evaluation plans in the acute or out-patient setting. Corequisite: NURS 5443. Prerequisite: NURS 5434 and NURS 5332. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5463. Acute and Critical Illness in Adult and Gerontology Populations. 3 Hours.

Provides an in-depth knowledge of management of acutely and critically ill adults. Emphasis is on the use of evidence-based knowledge to formulate diagnoses, treatment, evaluation plans, and referral for adults who have complex acute or critical health problems, or are at high risk for developing complications. Corequisite: NURS 5475. Prerequisite: NURS 5443 and NURS 5454. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5475. Acute and Critical Illness in Adult and Gerontology Populations Clinical Practicum. 5 Hours.

Experiences allow the student to apply safe, scientifically sound, cost effective, legal and ethical management strategies to the care of adults with complex acute and critical illness. Emphasis is on the development of advanced clinical skills in acute and critical care settings. Corequisite: NURS 5463. Prerequisite: NURS 5443 and NURS 5454. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5483. Common Problems in Primary Care. 3 Hours.

Examines principles of pathological mechanisms of disease, refines knowledge for thorough history taking, physical examination, and clinical decision-making for men, women, and families with common illnesses treated in primary care. Includes anticipatory guidance, health promotion, disease prevention, and reproductive health. Corequisite: NURS 5495. Prerequisite: NURS 5101 and NURS 5112. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5495. Common Problems in Primary Care Clinical Practicum. 5 Hours.

Clinical component to 5483 Common Problems Primary Care. Refines skills for thorough history taking, physical examination, and clinical decision-making for men, women, and families with common illnesses treated in primary care as well as health promotion, disease prevention, and reproductive health needs. Corequisite: NURS 5483. Prerequisite: NURS 5101 and NURS 5112. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5523. Healthcare Informatics. 3 Hours.

Prepares graduate students to serve as leaders in the utilization of information systems and technology to support and improve education, patient care, and healthcare systems. Assists students in evaluating and integrating qualified technologies into various practice settings. Students will explore current and emerging trends in Healthcare Informatics and their legal, ethical, and political implications. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 5543. Primary Care of Children. 3 Hours.

Focuses on evidence-based models for the management of children from diverse cultures with common conditions in primary care. Includes anticipatory guidance, health promotion, and disease prevention. Emphasis on application of theoretical concepts, assessment skills, clinical decision-making, and evidence-based standards to formulate differential diagnoses, clinical impressions, treatment, and evaluation plans in primary care. Corequisite: NURS 5683. Prerequisite: NURS 5873 and NURS 5884. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 5683. Primary Care of Children Clinical Practicum. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the management of children in the clinical setting with emphasis on holistic assessment and treatment of this population and their families. Students will engage in the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of conditions common to primary practice in pediatric clinics. This course will consist of 135 contact hours. Corequisite: NURS 5543. Prerequisite: NURS 5873 and NURS 5884. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 579V. Independent Study. 1-3 Hour.

Independent study designed by student with faculty advisor. May be completed as alternative to thesis. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

NURS 5873. Complex Problems in Primary Care. 3 Hours.

Focuses on application of health promotion and chronic disease management in complex adult patients. Students will utilize evidence-based approaches to health promotion, assessment, differential diagnosis and disease management. Emphasizes clinical decision making, chronic care models, coordination of care, poly-drug therapy and information systems. Corequisite: NURS 5884. Prerequisite: NURS 5483 and NURS 5495. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 5884. Complex Problems in Primary Care Clinical Practicum. 4 Hours.

Clinical component to NURS 5873 Complex Problems in Primary Care. Offers the student an opportunity to exercise critical judgment and implement theoretical knowledge in the management of care of adults experiencing complex health problems. Corequisite: NURS 5873. Prerequisite: NURS 5495 and NURS 5483. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 598V. Nursing Special Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Special Topics course to fulfill national accrediting body for Family Nurse Practitioner. Prerequisite: NURSDP major. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

NURS 599V. Seminar. 1-3 Hour.

Selected topics in nursing explored in discussion format. (Typically offered: Irregular)

NURS 600V. Master's Thesis. 1-3 Hour.

Student research to fulfill degree requirement for the MSN. Prerequisite: NURS 5053. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for degree credit.

NURS 6123. Evaluation Methods and Translational Research for Evidence-based Practice. 3 Hours.

The translation of evidence into practice, including theoretical and practical challenges, is analyzed through the use of case studies and proposals. Uses methods of inquiry for systematic appraisal of nursing practice or healthcare programs to identify practice outcomes and create an environment to support and sustain changes. Prerequisite: NURS 6343 or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 6224. DNP Clinical Practicum I. 4 Hours.

Provides an opportunity to synthesize advanced knowledge and role behaviors within a specialty concentration. Designed to apply nursing theory, translational research, epidemiologic principles, ethical/legal principles, outcome evaluations, healthcare systems thinking, and economics into a specialized clinical practice role and setting. Depending upon specialty and experience, may require travel to campus. Prerequisite: NURS 5443, NURS 5454, NURS 5463, and NURS 5475. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 6233. Healthcare Economics and Finance. 3 Hours.

Provides economic, financial, and business knowledge and skills required for a leadership role in financial planning and decision making within healthcare delivery systems. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 6244. DNP Clinical Practicum II. 4 Hours.

Provides an opportunity to synthesize advanced knowledge and role behaviors within a specialty concentration. Designed to apply nursing theory, translational research, epidemiologic principles, ethical/legal principles, outcome evaluations, healthcare systems thinking, and economics into a specialized clinical practice role and setting. Depending upon specialty and experience, may require travel to campus. Corequisite: NURS 7122. Prerequisite: NURS 6224. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 6263. Organization Management and Systems Leadership. 3 Hours.

Facilitates understanding of how to lead, advocate, and manage innovative responses to organizational needs and challenges. Emphasizes development and evaluation of care delivery models that meet the needs of targeted patient populations by enhancing accountability for effective and efficient healthcare, quality improvement, and patient safety. Prerequisite: Admission to the graduate program or by permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Summer)

NURS 628V. DNP Clinical Practicum III. 1-8 Hour.

Allows for the continuation of specialty role development and a more refined and advanced approach to care delivery, systems thinking, and leadership. Allows for the total number of practice hours required for certification and/or degree. Corequisite: NURS 5543, NURS 5683, NURS 5463, and NURS 5475. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

NURS 6343. Analytic Methods and Epidemiology for Health Care. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the role of epidemiology and statistics in advanced nursing practice. The student will learn how the concepts of epidemiology are used to measure and describe the health of individuals and populations and apply statistical concepts and analytical methods to data encountered in practice. Major topics to be covered include sources of data, study designs, analytical strategies and interpretation of data related to disease causality, risk, and prevalence. Prerequisite: ESRM 5393. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

NURS 6862. Rural Primary Care in Arkansas. 2 Hours.

This is a rural health course elective for graduate nursing students. The purpose of this course is to prepare them for the role of nurse practitioner educator in the academic setting by providing additional knowledge and exposure to topics and diseases seen in rural primary care in Arkansas. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NURS 6882. Opioid Use in Rural Arkansas. 2 Hours.

This course prepares graduate nursing students for the nurse practitioner role in rural settings by providing knowledge, exposure to risk factors, treatment strategies for opioid abuse and misuse, policies and regulations related to prescribing opioids, and gaps in community responses addressing this epidemic in rural primary care in Arkansas. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NURS 7113. Capstone Seminar I. 3 Hours.

Designed to unify and organize the student's field of inquiry for the final Capstone Project. Emphasis is on the application of an evidence-based intervention suitable to their area of focus that involves appropriate methodology and application with the goal for change in practice or outcome analysis. Prerequisite: Completion of NURS 6224 and/or permission of the instructor. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 7122. DNP Project Implementation I. 2 Hours.

Provides necessary support and elements for students to begin execution of the DNP Project in collaboration with the sponsoring site. (Typically offered: Fall)

NURS 7132. Capstone Seminar II. 2 Hours.

Focuses on data exploration and analysis for the organization and refinement of all aspects of Capstone Project, emphasizing implementation and evaluation of the evidence-based intervention. Allows student to finalize the scholarly written and oral report for dissemination of results. Corequisite: NURS 7142. Prerequisite: NURS 7113 and NURS 7122. (Typically offered: Spring)

NURS 7142. DNP Project Implementation II. 2 Hours.

Provides an avenue for students to complete and disseminate the DNP project. Allows students the opportunity to synthesize and demonstrate the ability to employ effective communication and collaboration skills, leadership roles, influence healthcare quality and safety, evaluate practice, and successfully negotiate change in healthcare delivery for individuals, families, populations, or systems. Prerequisite: NURS 7122. (Typically offered: Spring)