Sherry Muir
Chair & Program Director
50 Harmon Avenue
Fayetteville, AR
479-575-8727 (office)
Email: otd@uark.edu

Occupational Therapy Website

Degrees Awarded:
O.T.D. in Occupational Therapy (OTDEDP)

Program Description: The O.T.D. program is a 115-credit-hour, post-baccalaureate, 3-year (9 semester), full-time, on-campus program with an off-campus fieldwork and capstone component. Upon completion, an entry-level professional degree is awarded. This degree prepares graduates and meets requirements to sit for the National Board for the Certification of Occupational Therapy exam.

This degree is a joint offering between the College of Education and Health Professions of the University of Arkansas and the College of Health Professions of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and UAMS's Northwest campus in Fayetteville. The department's mission embodies both institutions' shared aim to enhance the health, well-being, and quality of life of the people of Arkansas, our nation, and world. By enabling occupational therapy students to become innovative, caring, globally-minded scholars, practitioners, and advocates, the Department advances an inclusive, emancipatory, and participatory, vision of society situated at the intersection of UAF and UAMS's missions. This distinctive entry-level clinical doctorate in occupational therapy is consistent with the accreditation standards of the American Occupational Therapy Association.

Please direct program inquiries to otd@uark.edu or call 479-713-8800

Requirements for O.T.D. in Occupational Therapy

Admission Requirements:

  • Abnormal Psychology — No substitutions allowed for this course.
  • Human Anatomy with lab — If anatomy and physiology are offered together as one course, then two semesters must be taken (example: Anatomy and Physiology I & II). There must be a lab component reflected.
  • Human Physiology with lab — If anatomy and physiology are offered together as one course, then two semesters must be taken (example: Anatomy and Physiology I & II). There must be a lab component reflected.
  • Neuroscience of Behavior — Also accepted: Brain and Behavior, Behavioral/Cognitive Neuroscience or Neurophysiology or Neuropsychology or Neurobiology, Physiological Psychology. Cognitive Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Social Psychology do not meet this requirement.
  • Statistics — Any undergraduate statistics course (examples: psychological statistics, educational statistics, statistics in nursing, statistics in healthcare, business statistics, scientific statistics, etc. are accepted.)
  • Technical or Research Writing — Graduate level writing skills (3000 level or above, may include graduate-level courses) are expected throughout the program starting in the first semester. Composition I and II do not meet this requirement.
  • Terminology for Health Professions — This course must be 3 credits to meet the prerequisite requirement. If you completed a medical terminology course with fewer credit hours, you will need to repeat the course at the 3-credit level.

Applicants must meet all requirements for admission to the University of Arkansas Graduate School, except the standardized test score requirement. Other admission requirements include:

  • A minimum overall GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.
  • International applicants must submit Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).
  • The GRE is not required or considered for the Occupational Therapy Doctoral program.
  • 25 hours of documented volunteering, shadowing, or service learning with an occupational therapy professional in at least three different settings, with at least two different populations, e.g., children and adults. The required form for both the student and the professional can be found on the OT website as a downloadable PDF.
  • Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can address potential for graduate education (includes current or former professors, academic administrators, advisors, and mentors who are not relatives of the applicant).
  • Written personal statement.
  • Eligible applicants will be directed to complete a Multiple Mini Interview (MMI), the Health Science Reasoning Test (HSRT) and the Computer-Based Assessment for Sampling Personal Characteristics (CASPer) assessments (additional cost) and a scholarly writing activity.

Requirements for O.T.D. in Occupational Therapy: This program is a 115-credit-hour, post-baccalaureate, 3-year (9 semesters), full-time, on-campus program with an off-campus fieldwork and capstone component.  Students are required to participate in and pass 7 designated IPE experiences under the framework provided by UAMS at ipe.uams.edu.

The fieldwork experiences are integrated throughout the program to structure increasingly complex experiences.  Drug screen and background check may affect clinical placements, may delay students' progress toward the degree, and may result in dismissal from the program.

The third year of the curriculum requires a capstone experience with a culminating project. Documented health insurance coverage is required by the department for all OTD students throughout the program. 

All courses are offered one time per year for lock-step progress through the program. Students will work with their academic committee should unexpected circumstances necessitate modifications to progress through the program.

All degree requirements must be completed within 5 years. This time frame includes all Level II fieldwork and the doctoral capstone which must be completed no longer than 2 years from the end of didactic coursework. 

Accreditation:  The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association has granted Candidacy Status to the Department of Occupational Therapy of the University of Arkansas/University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The association is located at 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929.  The accreditation council's telephone number is 301-652-6611 ext. 2042, with email accred@aota.org.

The program of the University of Arkansas and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy Status. The program must have a pre-accreditation review, complete an on-site evaluation and be granted Accreditation Status before its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, all states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

Note: a felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

Plan of Study
First Year (January Intersession)
OCTH 5001Introduction to an Occupational Perspective of Health and Learning1
First Year (Spring Semester)
OCTH 5121The Quest for Wellness1
OCTH 5112LThe Quest for Wellness Lab2
OCTH 5173The Science of Wellness3
OCTH 5103Theory and Foundations of Occupational Therapy3
OCTH 5203Professional Issues in Occupational Therapy3
OCTH 5142Research Fundamentals and Scholarly Practice2
OCTH 5332Exploring Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy2
First Year (May Intersession)
OCTH 5212Occupational Therapy Frameworks, Models, and Structures2
First Year (Summer Session)
OCTH 5243Evidence-based Clinical Reasoning3
OCTH 5293Foundations of Communication and Advocacy3
OCTH 5372Anatomy and Occupational Performance Lecture2
OCTH 5372LAnatomy and Occupational Performance Lab2
First Year (Fall Semester)
OCTH 5132Complexity Science & Applications to Occupational Therapy2
OCTH 5361Level I Fieldwork: Physical Conditions1
OCTH 5351Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Physical Conditions1
OCTH 5311Physical Conditions1
OCTH 5322Occupational Impacts of Pharmacology I: General Medical2
OCTH 5384Occupations, Adaptations, and Innovations: Physical Conditions4
OCTH 5581Upper Extremity Rehabilitation1
OCTH 5591LOccupations, Adaptations, and Innovations Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Laboratory1
OCTH 5393Introduction to Health Systems and Policy3
Second Year (Spring Semester)
SEVI 5213Business Foundations for Entrepreneurs3
OCTH 5461Level I Fieldwork: Neurology1
OCTH 5451Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Neurology1
OCTH 5443Research Methods in Occupational Therapy3
OCTH 5472Functional Neurology2
OCTH 5472LFunctional Neurology Lab2
OCTH 5411Neurological Conditions1
OCTH 5484Occupations, Adaptations, and Innovations: Neurological Conditions4
OCTH 5421Occupational Impacts of Pharmacology II: Neurology and Mental Health1
Second Year (May Intersessions)
OCTH 5111Behavioral and Mental Health Conditions1
Second Year (Summer Session)
OCTH 5561Level I Fieldwork: Behavioral and Mental Health1
OCTH 5551Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Behavioral and Mental Health1
OCTH 5643Integrative Approaches to Teaching and Learning3
OCTH 5613Occupations, Adaptations, Innovations: Mental & Behavioral Health3
OCTH 5623Leadership and Management3
OCTH 5541Integrating Creative Arts as a Modality in Practice1
Second Year (Fall Semester)
OCTH 5666Fieldwork IIA6
OCTH 5651Fieldwork IIA Seminar1
OCTH 5683Advanced Occupations, Adaptations and Innovations3
OCTH 5693Occupational Perspectives of Population Health3
OCTH 5632Conceptualizations of Occupational In/Justice2
Third Year (Spring Semester)
OCTH 5781Occupational Therapy Capstone Seminar 11
OCTH 5723Transitions and Life Design3
OCTH 5793Innovations in Community Based Practice3
OCTH 5766Fieldwork IIB6
OCTH 5751Fieldwork IIB Seminar1
Third Year (May Intersession)
OCTH 678VOccupational Therapy Capstone Independent Study 22
Third Year (Summer Session)
OCTH 6882Intentional Practitioner2
Third Year (Fall Semester)
OCTH 696VOccupational Therapy Capstone 36
Total Hours115

Program Progression 

The student is responsible to remain aware of academic and ethical/professional behavior standards and know that they can be placed on departmental probation (academic and/or ethical/professional behavior probation), be unable to progress in the OTD program, or be dismissed from the program based upon academic and/or ethical/professional behavior standards violations.

Students may be put on probation for either 1) failure to meet academic standards and/or 2) ethical/professional behavior violations.  Students may be placed on academic probation only once during their time in the OTD program. Students who fall into the academic probation range a second time will be dismissed from the program. Students may be placed on ethical/professional behavior violations probation only once during their time in the OTD program. Students who have a second ethical/professional behavior violation will be dismissed from the program. See details of theProbation and Dismissal Policies below. The student’s Faculty Mentor is available for consultation and assistance in all progression issues.

OTD courses are integrated, sequential, and progressive. Therefore, to maximize student success, departmental progression requirements are based on academic performance during each individual semester in the OTD program. This is separate from the UAF policy that bases progression on cumulative GPA. Please see the UAF Graduate Catalog Policies and Procedures for more information on University progressions and academic standing.

Semester GPA standards:

Good Standing - 3.00 or above

Probation - 2.85 and 2.99

Dismissal - 2.84 or below

Students who fall below the good standing GPA of 3.0 but above the 2.84 GPA and who have passed all courses with at least a “C” grade, the semester prior to any Level II Fieldwork or Capstone will be required to participate in up to 3 remediation activities to ensure their readiness for clinical work. These remediations may delay the start of Level II Fieldwork or Capstone.  Delays in Level II fieldwork will impact the progression to year 3 coursework. The student will be required to meet with their Faculty Mentor and the Progressions Committee to determine a plan of action. 

Remediation Activity 1: Student suggests specific learning activities which are approved or may be modified by the Faculty Mentor and Progressions Committee in the form of a Learning Contract.*

Remediation Activity 2: Repeat assignments/activities from one or more courses, based upon instructor and Progressions Committee recommendations.* 

Remediation Activity 3: Complete an evaluation with Student Health and/or the Student Success Center (i.e., academic coaching, career services, etc.) to address specific issues identified by instructors, Faculty Mentor, and/or the Progressions Committee.* 

Course Grade Requirements:

  1. Students must earn a grade of C or better in all courses in each semester before progressing into the next semester. Any grade below a C is considered a failing grade.  Earning a failing grade indicates the student has not mastered essential content or other curricular requirements for successful completion of the OTD program.

  2. If a D or F is earned, the student may request to repeat the course the next time it is offered, which will be the following year.

  3. The student must request a Leave of Absence while they wait for the course to be offered at its regularly scheduled time.

  4. A grade of C or better must be earned in the repeated course.  Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the OTD Program.

  5. The student will be on Academic Probation for the semester following the successful re-take of that course (not in the semester they are re-taking the course).

    1. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they are up-to-date on all other content from that semester. 

Only one leave of absence or probationary period may be granted during the OTD program.

Dismissal for Academic Standards

The OTD Program Director/Chair, in consultation with the Progressions Committee and the Graduate School, has the authority and responsibility to dismiss a student from the OTD program for not meeting academic standards:

  1. Earning a semester GPA of 2.84 or below. 

  2. A second semester in the OTD program with a GPA below the Good Standing GPA of a 3.0.  

  3.  Failure to pass a previously failed course with a grade of “C” or higher.  

A student notified of dismissal due to academic reasons may apply for transfer to another program or school at UAF under the condition that they meet the requirements and are accepted into the program or school where they wish to be transferred.

Academic Probation

Academic Probation indicates that a student is not making the academic progress required for the OTD program and will not continue in the program if they do not improve. 

  1. Departmental progression requirements are based on academic performance during each individual semester in the OTD program. This is separate from the UAF Graduate School policy that bases progression on cumulative GPA. 
  2. Probationary status allows the student an opportunity to improve academically and to demonstrate evidence of the capability to proceed toward a degree. Any student with a semester GPA in the probation range listed above will be placed on academic probation for ONE semester. 
  3. ALL subsequent semester GPAs must meet the “Good Standing” criteria or the student will be discontinued from the program.
  4. Students may be placed on academic probation only once during their graduate program. Students who fall into the academic probation range a second time will be dismissed from the program.

Ethical or Professional Behaviors Violations

The OTD Program Director/Chair, in consultation with the Progressions Committee and the Graduate School, has the authority and responsibility to dismiss a student from the OTD program for unethical, or unprofessional behavior. The process for which the following policies will be enforced are provided in the Student Handbook on the Occupational Therapy website.

Ethical Violations 

It is the OT Department’s belief that upholding the ethical principles and values of our profession is one of our highest responsibilities. We believe that choosing to engage in unethical behavior as a student is a strong indicator that they will be willing to make that same choice as a professional. We must be gatekeepers of our profession, doing our best to ensure that those who graduate from our program have the highest ethical standards. Therefore, any and all incidents of ethical violations will be addressed immediately and seriously, which may include dismissal from the program. Any ethical violation may lead to ethical/professional behavior probation, but the following violations may lead to immediate dismissal (without first being on probation):

  1. A discovered pattern of ethical violations that culminate to a significant ethical violation breach
  2. A single, significant ethical violation breach
  3. Unethical conduct during any community activity, fieldwork or capstone placement that jeopardizes, or appears to jeopardize the health, welfare, or safety of clients, healthcare workers, or facilities will be considered significant misconduct and may result in immediate removal from the site, failure of the assignment/fieldwork, and/or dismissal from the program. 

Further, students may be dismissed if they are unsuccessful in their ethical behavior probation remediation plan.

The department reserves the right to enact the dismissal process, through due process of the OTD Progressions Committee, for unforeseen actions or ethical breaches not specifically listed above.

Professional Behavior Violations

Students in the Occupational Therapy Program are preparing for professional practice in health, education, and social service arenas. Professionalism is essential to practice, and for success in this academic program. Students must be accurate and truthful, demonstrate empathy and sensitivity, integrity and ethics, professional conduct, sound judgment, and personal responsibility.

These criteria are based on the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Code of Ethics, the AOTA Occupational Therapy Standards of Practice, the AOTA Fieldwork Performance Evaluation, and the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) Code of Conduct and University Academic Integrity Policy.

Professional Behavior is a compilation of many behaviors and complex interactions. These will be evaluated routinely using the Assessment of Professional Behaviors form (APB). This form will facilitate students’ self-evaluation and development as well as provide a mechanism for structured faculty feedback and a form of documentation.

Incidents which may include placement on Professional Behaviors Probation or dismissal from the program: 

  1.  A pattern of unprofessional behavior,
  2.  A single, significant breach of professional behavior expectations (especially during fieldwork or capstone).
  3. Unsuccessful remediation of professional behavior probation plan.  

The department reserves the right to enact the dismissal process, through due process of the OTD Progressions Committee, for unforeseen actions or behaviors not specifically listed here. 

A student notified of dismissal due to unethical, or unprofessional behavior reasons may apply for transfer to another program or school at UAF under the condition that they meet the requirements and are accepted into the program or school where they wish to be transferred.  

Voluntary Withdrawal

Students who wish to withdraw from the program for personal reasons must notify their faculty mentor and the Program Director of their plans. After at least one year away, if the student wishes to reenter the program, they must reapply for admission to the OTD program and the Graduate School if they intend to reenter the program. 

Readmission is not guaranteed after withdrawal. Students may be allowed to resume where they exited or may be required to start the program from the beginning. If allowed to resume, due to the progressive, increasingly rigorous nature of the curriculum and changing nature of healthcare, all program requirements must be completed within 5 years of the student’s original semester of enrollment.

More detailed guidelines about the progression policies and other requirements are provided in the Student Handbook on the Occupational Therapy website.

Accreditation: The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education of the American Occupational Therapy Association has granted Candidacy Status to the Department of Occupational Therapy of the University of Arkansas/University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The association is located at 6116 Executive Blvd., Suite 200, North Bethesda, MD 20852-4929.  The accreditation council's telephone number is 301-652-6611 ext. 2042, with email accred@aota.org.

The program of the University of Arkansas and the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy Status. The program must have a pre-accreditation review, complete an on-site evaluation and be granted Accreditation Status before its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, all states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination.

Note: A felony conviction may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

Graduate Faculty

Ball, Maria A., O.T.D. (University of Kansas for Medical Sciences), M.O.T. (University of Oklahoma Health Science Center), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2020.
Muir, Sherry, Ph.D. (Walden University), M.O.T. (Texas Women’s University), Associate Professor, 2017.
Salter, Kandy S.L., O.T.D. (University of Kansas), M.S. (University of Central Arkansas), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2018.
Troillett, Amanda, O.T.D. (Washington University St. Louis), B.A. (University of Cincinnati), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2021.

Courses

OCTH 5001. Introduction to an Occupational Perspective of Health and Learning. 1 Hour.

Community is integral to being, doing, becoming, and belonging . . . and to learning how to think, feel, and act like an occupational therapist. This course introduces us to ideas and evidence that guide teaching and learning in the OTD curriculum. We will begin to build a preliminary understanding of the profession's basic tenets and explore how integrative and relational theories of learning support the acquisition of our distinctive way of seeing that is how we think about and look at human doing, being, becoming, and belonging in the context of community. In the process of reflecting on our lives as thinkers, learners, and occupational beings, we will begin to recognize what kinds of learning (relational, integrative) are possible and potentially important to fostering our personal growth and our identities as occupational therapists. Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Doctoral Program. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5103. Theory and Foundations of Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

The broad theoretical basis of occupational therapy (OT) will be mapped. OT theory development, the historical foundations, major paradigm shifts, current theoretical trends, and philosophical assumptions that have developed across the profession's life span and continue to shape occupational therapy practice are explored. The emergence of occupation-based models of practice and theories that impact OT's evolving domain and process will be discussed, with emphasis on the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process (OTPF). The evolving definitions of occupation and its relationship to health, well-being, and participation will be examined. Prerequisite: Admission to the Occupational Therapy Doctoral Program. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5111. Behavioral and Mental Health Conditions. 1 Hour.

Students will develop a working knowledge of categories of mental health conditions and how those conditions impact occupational performance. Students will be able to discuss implications on participation across the lifespan and explain clinical conditions and their occupational impacts to patients/clients in a way that is understandable, using visual aids, drawings, and other tools. Prerequisite: OCTH 5411 and OCTH 5472. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5112L. The Quest for Wellness Lab. 2 Hours.

This highly experiential lab accompanies the Quest for Wellness Lecture course. Students will focus on the lived experience of making personal changes to improve overall wellness, including the act of asking for help and its contexts, working in partnerships and groups, evidence-based goal setting and revision, and developmental considerations of wellness across the lifespan. This course prepares students for the Community Wellness Project in the following semester. Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5001. Corequisite: OCTH 5121. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5121. The Quest for Wellness. 1 Hour.

This course introduces students to the physical, cognitive, and emotional components of health and wellness across the life span. Students will then apply these concepts to facilitate personal wellness and professional development. Students will learn and practice multiple strategies for enhancing occupational adaptation and performance. Accompanies The Quest for Wellness Lab. Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5001. Corequisite: OCTH 5112L. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5132. Complexity Science & Applications to Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

Students will define and apply principles of complex adaptive leadership and complexity science to the dynamics of occupation and occupational participation. They will describe how their personal ways of thinking and ability to create new ideas and perspectives can impact the occupational needs of society. Students will evaluate their personal response to complexity and uncertainty and begin to evaluate complex variables that relate to and impact occupational participation (e.g. policy and leadership). Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5001. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5142. Research Fundamentals and Scholarly Practice. 2 Hours.

Students are introduced to principles of scientific research that promote evidence-based OT practice and scholarly inquiry. Students will also learn how to locate, read, analyze, synthesize, and assess the strengths and limitations of research articles and different research methodologies and explore the ethical dimensions of human subject research. The final outcome will be a well written literature review following the APA style of writing. Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5001. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5173. The Science of Wellness. 3 Hours.

Students will investigate the physiology of wellness and begin to explore client factors, performance skills, performance patterns, contexts and environments, and responses to stress as they relate to health and wellness. This course explores the impacts between the things we see (I.e. people's habits, routines, etc. and the things we cannot see (i.e people's body structures and functions) as they relate to the biological bases for wellness. Corequisite: OCTH 5121 and OCTH 5112L. Pre- or Corequisite: OCTH 5001. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5203. Professional Issues in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

This course provides a foundation for understanding professional development as students evolve into occupational therapy practitioners. Students are introduced to the roles of professional associations, legislative processes that may impact occupational therapy practice, and requirements for initial and ongoing professional registration, certification, and licensure. Students examine how occupational therapists interface with other stakeholders within a complex healthcare environment to ensure that the occupational needs of individuals and communities are met. Group process, advocacy and ethical decision making as a part of contemporary practice are also introduced. Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5001. Corequisite: OCTH 5103. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5212. Occupational Therapy Frameworks, Models, and Structures. 2 Hours.

Students will understand and apply fundamental concepts of occupation-based models and frameworks. Students will build upon foundational knowledge obtained in 5103: Theory and Foundations of OT in order to learn how to apply occupation-based models and frameworks in practice with use of OTPF language. Prerequisite: OCTH 5103. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5243. Evidence-based Clinical Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Students will explore the different types of clinical and professional reasoning needed for becoming a critical and self-reflective practitioner. Students will be introduced to evidence-based practice and build upon concepts learned in OCTH 5141. Prerequisite: OCTH 5141. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5293. Foundations of Communication and Advocacy. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on developing effective therapeutic and interprofessional relationships through communication (written, verbal/nonverbal) and professional advocacy skills with a variety of stakeholders (ie. clients/caregivers, funding sources, service users, policymakers, etc.). Students will practice building rapport, providing/receiving feedback, navigating conflict, utilizing therapeutic use of self, articulating OT's distinct value, perspective on health, and advocacy roles. Students will identify personal, cultural, and situational factors that impact communication and advocacy. Pre- or corequisite: OCTH 5203. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5311. Physical Conditions. 1 Hour.

Students will have a working knowledge of categories of physical conditions and how they impact occupational performance. They will be able to discuss implications on participation across the lifespan and explain clinical conditions and their occupational impacts to patients/clients in a way that is understandable, using visual aids, drawings, and other tools. Prerequisite: OCTH 5173. Corequisite: OCTH 5372 and OCTH 5371L. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5322. Occupational Impacts of Pharmacology I: General Medical. 2 Hours.

Students will gain functional knowledge of general medical pharmaceutical interventions, how major categories of drugs may impact occupational performance, and be able to discuss implications on participation across the lifespan. Corequisite: OCTH 5371L and OCTH 5311. Prerequisite: OCTH 5173. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5332. Exploring Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

This course introduces students to the origin and evolution of Occupational Science, the study of humans as occupational beings, and its dynamic relationship to occupational therapy. Students will examine specific occupations and the dynamics of occupation across the lifespan as they explore how occupational scientists have brought their critical perspectives to bear on topics/issues essential to competent OT practice. Students will learn about the occupational perspective as it applies to occupational engagement across the lifespan, context, co-occupations, occupational justice, and storytelling. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5351. Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Physical Conditions. 1 Hour.

Students will integrate skills acquired in didactic course work and fieldwork experiences to transform into entry-level practitioners. This is the first in a 5 fieldwork seminar course series, where students apply their knowledge of national, state, and local legislation, ethical standards, and practice guidelines. They refine professional behaviors, clinical reasoning skills, and ethical decision-making while engaging in the OT process with the client constellation. Students critically reflect on life-experiences, clinical observations, and evidence-based literature to develop skills for entry-level occupation-centered practice. Students will understand that engagement in meaningful occupation is the goal of the therapeutic process and realize the impact of their role and the role of others in the client's journey throughout the OT process. Students will become life-long learners through the integration of seeing, doing, and becoming. Corequisite: OCTH 5361. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill-based competency exams, and departmental consent. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5361. Level I Fieldwork: Physical Conditions. 1 Hour.

Students will engage in directed clinical experiences and demonstrate clinical competencies identified by the OTD program and fieldwork site(s). They will develop/enhance professional behaviors, observation, activity analysis, and occupational analysis skills. Students will adequately perform basic assessment techniques such as an occupational profile, taking vitals, completing range of motion and manual muscle testing as outlined in site specific objectives. Interconnected relationships between personal, social, and environmental factors and participation in occupations for individuals and groups are highlighted. Students will be expected to integrate knowledge, experience, and evidence while developing clinical reasoning skills. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill based competency exams and departmental consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5351 and OCTH 5384. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5372. Anatomy and Occupational Performance Lecture. 2 Hours.

Students will make meaningful connections between activities, occupations, body functions, and body structures. They will identify the knowledge community and resources available to enhance self-directed learning and experiences in the classroom while developing a strong working knowledge of how participation in activities and occupations relate to biological and physical sciences (including kinesiology). Students will demonstrate and apply clinical knowledge and skills related to anatomical structures and functions required for safety and participation in activities and occupations across the lifespan. Prerequisite: OCTH 5173. Corequisite: OCTH 5372L. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5372L. Anatomy and Occupational Performance Lab. 2 Hours.

Students will make meaningful connections between activities, occupations, body functions, and body structures. They will identify the knowledge community and resources available to enhance self-directed learning and experiences in the lab while developing a strong working knowledge of how participation in activities and occupations relate to biological and physical sciences (including kinesiology). Students will demonstrate and apply clinical knowledge and skills related to anatomical structures and functions required for evaluation of body structures and functions to promote safety and participation in activities and occupations across the lifespan. Prerequisite: OCTH 5173. Corequisite: OCTH 5372. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5384. Occupations, Adaptations, and Innovations: Physical Conditions. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on basic OT skills, occupation-centered adaptations, and interventions for physical conditions for individuals across the lifespan. The OT process will be explored and applied to address physical conditions across the lifespan. Prerequisite: OCTH 5173. Corequisite: OCTH 5372, OCTH 5371L and OCTH 5361. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5393. Introduction to Health Systems and Policy. 3 Hours.

This course presents an introduction to health systems and policy and explores their influence on both the scope of OT practice and the everyday things that people do. Understanding the policymaking process, the US healthcare system (including health insurance and reform), and the intertwining of policy with politics will prepare students to thrive in the super-complex world of everyday practice. Students will survey transformations taking place across US healthcare and how these changes are influencing OT service delivery and reimbursement. Students will be encouraged to envision how OT could be delivered outside of traditional settings to meet the occupational needs of people, communities, and society. Corequisite: OCTH 5132. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5411. Neurological Conditions. 1 Hour.

Students will develop a working knowledge of categories of neurological conditions and how they impact occupational performance. They will be able to discuss implications on participation across the lifespan, and explain clinical conditions and their occupational impacts to patients/clients in a way that is understandable, using visual aids, drawings, and other tools. Prerequisite: OCTH 5311. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5421. Occupational Impacts of Pharmacology II: Neurology and Mental Health. 1 Hour.

Students will gain functional knowledge of neurological and mental health pharmaceutical interventions, how major categories may impact occupational performance, and be able to discuss implications on participation across the lifespan. Corequisite: OCTH 5472, OCTH 5472L and OCTH 5411. Prerequisite: OCTH 5322. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5443. Research Methods in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the opportunity to learn and apply techniques, methods, tools, and perspectives vital to clinical research and professional reasoning in occupational science and occupational therapy. Students will deepen their understanding of the scientific method, research process and designs, and methods for data collection, analysis, and dissemination. Prerequisite: OCTH 5243. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5451. Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Neurology. 1 Hour.

This course builds upon skills acquired in OCTH 5351. Students will continue to demonstrate knowledge and application of the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2020), national, state, and local service provision requirements. Students will reflect on the occupational therapy process through the OTPF-4 to determine the effect of occupational therapy intervention, the need for modification of interventions, as well as discharge or transition service considerations. Additionally, this fieldwork seminar emphasizes cultural influences, policy factors, and clinical reasoning skills through class activities and discussion of observations made during the Level 1 Fieldwork Neurology experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill-based competency exams and department consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5461. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5461. Level I Fieldwork: Neurology. 1 Hour.

Students will engage in directed clinical experiences and demonstrate clinical competencies identified by the OTD program and fieldwork site(s). They will develop/enhance professional behaviors, observation, activity analysis, and occupational analysis skills. Students will adequately perform components of the occupational therapy process as outlined in site specific objectives. Interconnected relationships between personal, social, and environmental factors and participation in occupations for individuals and groups are highlighted. Students will be expected to integrate knowledge, experience, and evidence while developing clinical reasoning skills. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill-based competency exams and department consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5451 and OCTH 5484. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5472. Functional Neurology. 2 Hours.

Students will gain a strong working knowledge and appreciation of nervous system development, functions, and the impacts of injury (congenital or acquired) on individuals, caregivers, and communities. This course will focus on neuroscience and its relationship to occupational performance across the lifespan. This course will accompany OCTH 5472L Functional Neurology Lab & OCTH 5483 OAI for Neurologic Conditions. Corequisite: OCTH 5472L. Prerequisite: OCTH 5372. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5472L. Functional Neurology Lab. 2 Hours.

Students will be able to discuss neurological concepts and their relationship with occupation and the dynamics of occupation. Students will analyze and apply common neurological testing, determine appropriate standardized and non-standardized assessments for the neurological population, administer, and interpret data collected. They will gain an appreciation for the interactions between neurological state and aspects of the OTPF Domain. Corequisite: OCTH 5472. Prerequisite: OCTH 5372. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5484. Occupations, Adaptations, and Innovations: Neurological Conditions. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on occupation centered adaptations and interventions for neurologic conditions. Adaptive solutions to occupational performance issues are explored and applied to authentic environments. Problem based learning incorporating previously covered material will be utilized to facilitate innovation and client-centered solutions. Corequisite: OCTH 5472, OCTH 5472L, OCTH 5411 and OCTH 5461. Prerequisite: OCTH 5384. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5541. Integrating Creative Arts as a Modality in Practice. 1 Hour.

This course explores traditional and non-traditional applications of creative arts in practice. Students will be encouraged to employ therapeutic use of self to identify how they might use their interests, traditions and talents in their own practices. Etiquette regarding terminology that references established creative arts therapy fields; an overview of the degree and skill requirements for those fields will be discussed. Students will access and discuss literature in peer reviewed creative arts journals to identify similarities and differences in scope of practice, gain new ideas, and identify potential collaborative partners in practice and research. Prerequisite: OCTH 5332 and OCTH 5443. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5551. Level I Fieldwork Seminar: Behavioral and Mental Health. 1 Hour.

This builds upon skills acquired in OCTH 5351, OCTH 5451, didactic coursework, and fieldwork experiences. Students will continue to demonstrate knowledge and application of the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2020), national, state, and local service provision requirements. Students will reflect on the occupational therapy process through the OTPF-4 to determine the effect of occupational therapy intervention, the need for modification of interventions, as well as the need for continued or modified intervention in collaboration with the client constellation. Additionally, fieldwork seminar emphasizes cultural influences, policy factors, and clinical reasoning skills through class activities and discussion of observations made during the Level 1 Fieldwork Mental Health experience. Corequisite: OCTH 5561. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill based competency exams and department consent. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5561. Level I Fieldwork: Behavioral and Mental Health. 1 Hour.

Students will engage in directed clinical experiences and demonstrate clinical competencies identified by the OTD program and fieldwork site(s). They will develop/enhance professional behaviors, observation, activity analysis, and occupational analysis skills. Students will adequately perform components of the occupational therapy process as outlined in site specific objectives. Interconnected relationships between personal, social, and environmental factors and participation in occupations for individuals and groups are highlighted. Students will be expected to integrate knowledge, experience, and evidence while developing clinical reasoning skills. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous skill based competency exams and department consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5551 and OCTH 5613. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5581. Upper Extremity Rehabilitation. 1 Hour.

Students will apply knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy, neuromuscular physiology and biomechanics to optimize upper extremity function for occupational performance across the lifespan. Students will discuss how professional reasoning is used to identify occupation-based assessments and interventions specific to the upper extremity. They will identify the interaction between performance skills and occupation to propose solutions to optimize occupational performance across the lifespan. Corequisite: OCTH 5591. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5591L. Occupations, Adaptations, and Innovations Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Laboratory. 1 Hour.

This course focuses on the evaluation and treatment of upper extremity dysfunction, with emphasis on the wrist and hand, from an occupational perspective. Students will administer and interpret common upper extremity evaluations, develop occupation centered interventions, and fabricate orthotics to promote occupational performance. This lab course accompanies OCTH 5581 Upper Extremity Rehabilitation Lecture. Corequisite: OCTH 5581. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5613. Occupations, Adaptations, Innovations: Mental & Behavioral Health. 3 Hours.

This course will introduce occupation-based interventions to address the psychosocial and behavioral health conditions that impact occupational performance, focusing on the impact that environmental, developmental and personal contexts have on mental health with regard to participation and recovery. Students incorporate knowledge about human development and function across diagnosis and ages to develop individual, group, and population-based interventions. Corequisite: OCTH 5561. Prerequisite: OCTH 5111. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5623. Leadership and Management. 3 Hours.

This course will explore leadership theories and management approaches. Students will apply principles of leadership and management to strategic plan development, continuous quality improvement, program evaluation, and ethical service delivery. Prerequisite: OCTH 5132 and OCTH 5393. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5632. Conceptualizations of Occupational In/Justice. 2 Hours.

This course examines the conceptual development of occupational in/justice and explores the various forms of occupational injustices encountered in OT practice. Students will analyze and critique occupational in/justice-related concepts and themes and apply their emerging occupational justice perspective of health to critically address injustices encountered in clinical experiences. Prerequisite: OCTH 5332. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5643. Integrative Approaches to Teaching and Learning. 3 Hours.

The learning process and role of teacher/facilitator are explored. Evidence based learning theories and their applications across occupational therapy domains are examined. Students will apply instructional design principles to educate stakeholders and promote the profession of occupational therapy. Prerequisite: OCTH 5443. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 5651. Fieldwork IIA Seminar. 1 Hour.

This coursebuilds upon skills acquired in Level I fieldwork seminar courses, didactic coursework, and fieldwork experiences. Students continue to demonstrate knowledge and application of the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics (2020), national, state, and local service provision requirements. Students reflect on the occupational therapy process through the OTPF-4 to determine the effect of occupational therapy intervention, the need for modification of interventions, as well as the need for continued or modified intervention in collaboration with the client constellation. Additionally, this fieldwork seminar emphasizes cultural influences, policy factors, and clinical reasoning skills through class activities and discussion of observations made during Level II fieldwork experiences. Corequisite: OCTH 5666. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous coursework, skill based competencies, and department consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Summer)

OCTH 5666. Fieldwork IIA. 6 Hours.

Students engage in directed clinical experiences and demonstrate clinical competencies identified by the OTD program, fieldwork site(s), and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FPE). These experiences are supervised clinical placements that develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupation therapists who can provide services across age ranges, service models, and practice areas. Students will adequately perform components of the occupational therapy process as outlined in site specific objectives and the FPE. Corequisite: OCTH 5651. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous coursework, skill based competencies, and department consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

OCTH 5683. Advanced Occupations, Adaptations and Innovations. 3 Hours.

Students will explore a variety of mid-to-high tech adaptations designed to facilitate occupational participation. Collaboration with other disciplines to develop innovative adaptive solutions is discussed. The decision-making process used in making recommendations for high tech adaptation is analyzed. Individual and contextual variables that impact access to and use of mid-to-high tech adaptations are considered. Students will develop innovative, client centered solutions to improve occupational performance and quality of life. Students will explore potential partnerships with organizations that provide resources and advocacy to enhance occupational performance through technology. Prerequisite: OCTH 5384 and OCTH 5483. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5693. Occupational Perspectives of Population Health. 3 Hours.

This course will apply an occupational perspective to public health initiatives at local, state, federal, and global levels. Public health laws and ethics will be analyzed along with strategies used to design and evaluate community based public health programs in conjunction with service learning. Prerequisite: OCTH 5393 and OCTH 5623. (Typically offered: Fall)

OCTH 5723. Transitions and Life Design. 3 Hours.

Transitions impact habits, routines, identities, roles, and purpose. This course delves into the process and outcomes of planned and unplanned life transitions to further gain perspective on the implications of change across the lifespan. Topics include theories and processes of transition from multiple perspectives, strategies for transition planning, and exploration of current and prospective roles for occupational therapy as transition specialists. Prerequisite: OCTH 5666 and OCTH 5651. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5751. Fieldwork IIB Seminar. 1 Hour.

This course includes discussion and reflection focused on fieldwork experiences, including a critical examination of service provision and populations served. Students will document achievement and self-evaluation throughout the Fieldwork experience. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous coursework, skill based competencies, and department consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5766. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5766. Fieldwork IIB. 6 Hours.

Students will engage in directed clinical experiences and demonstrate clinical competencies identified by the OTD program, fieldwork site(s), and the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FPE). These experiences are supervised clinical placements that develop competent, entry-level, generalist occupation therapists who can provide services across age ranges, service models, and practice areas. Students will adequately perform components of the occupational therapy process as outlined in site specific objectives and the FPE. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous coursework, skill based competencies, and department consent. Corequisite: OCTH 5751. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 5781. Occupational Therapy Capstone Seminar. 1 Hour.

The Capstone seminar provides students with an in-depth understanding of expectations, timelines and responsibilities as they prepare for OCTH 696V Occupational Capstone. Students collaborate with a Faculty Mentor/ Capstone Chair and possible site mentor(s) to design a comprehensive proposal for the Capstone experience and project that demonstrates synthesis of previous coursework. This includes a literature review, needs assessment, individualized goals/objectives, and an evaluation plan. Student Transformation: Students confidently map out a comprehensive strategy for successful completion of capstone project that reflects the departments mission and vision to prepare future practitioners to be change agents, innovators, collaborators, advocates, stewards, and scholars. Prerequisite: Departmental consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

OCTH 5793. Innovations in Community Based Practice. 3 Hours.

This course prepares the innovative future occupational therapist to envision possibilities for clinical work outside of traditional education or medical service delivery models. Students will apply an occupational justice perspective of health as they create a novel initiative that supports occupational participation. Prerequisite: OCTH 5683 and OCTH 5632. (Typically offered: Spring)

OCTH 6631. Applications of Occupational In/Justice. 1 Hour.

Students will deepen and sharpen their critical occupational perspective of health and well-being by applying occupational in/justice-related concepts to address and confront occupational injustices. Prerequisite: OCTH 5632. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 678V. Occupational Therapy Capstone Independent Study. 1-2 Hour.

Students will complete and defend their formal needs assessment and literature review in the individualized, chosen area of interest around one or more of the following: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, and theory development. Students will collaborate with their Capstone mentors throughout this process to finalize objectives and a plan to evaluate their Capstone Experience and Project. Students are expected to critically evaluate complex variables while constructing a plan to address issues that impact occupational participation. Prerequisite: Departmental consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 8 hours of degree credit.

OCTH 6882. Intentional Practitioner. 2 Hours.

This course will integrate foundational & advanced knowledge and experiential learning to prepare students for the transition from student to engaged professional (change agents, innovators, advocates, collaborators, stewards, and scholars). Students will engage in complex problem-solving tasks, ethical decision making, and reflections intended to foster future engagement by identifying personal and professional guiding principles, mission and vision statements, and a professional action plan to successfully pass the national board exam & be employed in the practice setting of their choice. Prerequisite: OCTH 5766 and OCTH 5751. (Typically offered: Summer)

OCTH 696V. Occupational Therapy Capstone. 1-6 Hour.

The Occupational Therapy Capstone experience and project provides students with an in-depth exposure to clinical practice, research, administration, leadership, policy, and/or program development. Students are expected to collaborate with a mentor to design learning and performance objectives prior to initiating onsite experiences. The experience concludes with a culminating project reflecting the student's integration of occupation centered knowledge and skills and ability to engage in critical and self-reflective inquiry. This course is graded on a Credit/Fail basis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all previous coursework, skill based competency exams, and department consent. (Typically offered: Fall) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.