Anthropology (ANTH)

JoAnn D'Alisera
Acting Chair of the Department
330 Old Main
479-575-2508
anth@uark.edu

Department of Anthropology Website

Courses in anthropology provide an introduction to world peoples, their ways of living, and world views. Anthropology helps students to better understand human similarities and differences.

The Department of Anthropology offers both a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Arts degree in anthropology.

The Bachelor of Science degree program is geared toward students with specializations in anthropological sciences. It is recommended for students planning to continue their education in basic or applied anthropological sciences in graduate or professional school. A B.S. degree in anthropology is also useful students planning to continue their education toward health or medical related careers.

The Bachelor of Arts degree program allows students to take additional coursework in any of four areas of focused study: archeology, biological anthropology, cartography/remote sensing/GIS, or cultural anthropology.

For the combined major in Anthropology and African and African American Studies, see the African and African American Studies listing.

For requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology, see the Graduate School Catalog.

Courses

ANTH 10141. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 10143. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 10143. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of biological anthropology using evolution and human variation as unifying concepts. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate and human evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 10141. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer)

ANTH 101H1. Honors Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 101H3 and honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 101H3. Honors Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of biological anthropology using evolution and human variation as unifying concepts. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate and human evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 101H1. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 10203. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013). 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. Corequisite: Drill component. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

ANTH 102H3. Honors Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality; comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 10303. Introduction to Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Archaeology studies the human past through contextual analysis of artifacts, archaeological sites, and landscapes. This course introduces archaeological methods and theories, significant discoveries and current debates in the discipline. Corequisite: Lab component. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 20143. Introduction to Latin American Studies. 3 Hours.

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America. Drawing on Latin American literature, history, sociology, and political science, the course examines the broad forces that have shaped the region. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 30003. World Prehistory. 3 Hours.

Survey of the prehistoric and early historic cultures of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 30103. Myths, Mysteries, and Manipulations of the Past. 3 Hours.

Examines many archaeological fantasies, evaluates the evidence for and against such fringe theories, and confronts pseudoscience in everyday life. Dispels popular fantasies and "fake news" about the past. (Typically offered: Fall Odd Years)

ANTH 30203. Approaches to Archeology. 3 Hours.

Study of the field of archeology including method, theory, analysis and interpretation with substantive worldwide examples. Prerequisite: ANTH 10303. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 30403. Bones, Bodies, and Brains in Evolutionary Perspective. 3 Hours.

This course will review the anatomy of the human body, comparing this anatomy with primates, mammals, and vertebrates, and it will consider how the major features of the human body emerged throughout evolution. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 31203. The Anthropology of Religion. 3 Hours.

An exploration of rituals, symbols, and rules that shape religious life. Religion is viewed broadly, considering activities that invoke powers beyond the reach of ordinary senses. Examining a variety of cultures, we explore what people say and do as they participate in activities such as magic, healing, pilgrimage, and contemporary religious movements. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 32103. Indigenous Peoples of North America: Anthropological Perspectives. 3 Hours.

An exploration of indigenous societies and cultures of North America from an anthropological perspective. Using examples from diverse Native Nations from the time of European contact to the present, we will examine colonialism and resistance, indigenous cosmologies, memory culture and oral tradition, and the politics of representation. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 32603. Indians of Arkansas and the South. 3 Hours.

Study of the history and archeology of Native Americans living in the southeastern United States, including Arkansas. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

ANTH 33203. Evolution of the Human Mating System. 3 Hours.

Examines basic principles governing the evolution of sexual behavior and anatomy in mammals, compares the features of human mating systems to those of primates, and explores models for the origin of fundamental features of the human social system. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 34201. Human Osteology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of human osteology. Corequisite: ANTH 34233. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 34233. Human Osteology. 3 Hours.

Study of the human skeleton, identification of bones, allometric growth, sexual dimorphism, osteological genetic inheritance and environmental stresses. Lectures and demonstration. Corequisite: ANTH 34201. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 34303. Human Evolution. 3 Hours.

A study of hominid evolution from origin to the present, including trends in comparative primate evolution and functional development of human form as a result of cultural and biological interaction. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 34703. North American Prehistory. 3 Hours.

Survey of the aboriginal prehistory of the North American Continent north of Mexico. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 35303. Medical Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Survey of the interrelationship of human biology, culture and environment as reflected in disease experience from an evolutionary and cross cultural perspective. Special emphasis on stress. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 35403. Geospatial Applications and Information Science. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the methods and theory underlying the full range of geographic information science and collateral areas - including GNSS, remote sensing, cadastral, spatial demographics and others. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 35503. Religion in Latin America. 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary implications of Latin America's unique religious heritage. An exploration of multiple Latin American religious traditions, with sustained focus on key theoretical concerns: conversion, vernacular vs. orthodox expressions, the blending of indigenous and European cosmologies, devotion and ritual, and the articulation of ethnic, gendered, and religious identities. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 35603. Culture and Medicine. 3 Hours.

Study of health and medicine within cultural contexts, including attention to cross-cultural healers and healing systems. Special emphasis on biomedicine as a cultural system. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 35803. Body and Identity. 3 Hours.

This course explores personal, social and cultural constructions and performances of the body and identity, highlighting key intersections of embodiment including gender, race, sexuality and abilities. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 35903. Bioarchaeology: Bodies of the Past. 3 Hours.

Bioarchaeology is the study of human remains recovered from archaeological contexts. An overview of the field's history, ethical considerations, and relationship to the broader social sciences and STEM fields. Focuses on interpreting an individual's lived experience from their skeletal remains and mortuary context to reconstruct past phenomena. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

ANTH 37103. Extinction: Bad Genes or Bad Luck?. 3 Hours.

Explores mass extinctions through the history of life on Earth, with particular emphasis on the Quaternary (the last 2.6 million years) where hominins, particularly humans have played a dominant role in shaping the ecosystems we experience today. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 39003. Topics in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 392H3. Honors Colloquium. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in anthropology). (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

ANTH 399HV. Honors Thesis. 1-6 Hour.

Honors thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 40103. History of Anthropological Thought. 3 Hours.

Detailed consideration of anthropological theory through study of its historical development. The research paper fulfills the Fulbright College Writing Requirement for anthropology majors. Prerequisite: ANTH 10203 and Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 40403. Ancient Cities. 3 Hours.

Explores pre-modern cities from the earliest in the world to those on the brink of industrialization. Employs anthropological archaeology as its primary approach, but also draws upon formal/functional analysis of urban plans, historical documentation, urban planning and history, and semiotics to interpret the built-environment as a form of non-verbal communication. (Typically offered: Spring Even Years)

ANTH 40503. Anthropology of the City. 3 Hours.

Explores the implications of several pivotal urban and cultural trends and how representations of the city have informed dominant ideas about city space, function, and meaning. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 40903. The Archeology of Death. 3 Hours.

Study of the analysis and interpretation of archeological mortuary remains and sites. Key archeological and anthropological sources that have influenced major theoretical developments are reviewed. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 41403. Ecological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Anthropological perspectives on the study of relationships among human populations and their ecosystems. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 42506. Archeological Field Session. 6 Hours.

Practical field and laboratory experiences in archeological research. (Typically offered: Summer) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 42603. Identity and Culture in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 43503. Laboratory Methods in Archeology. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of describing, analyzing, and reporting upon archeological materials. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 43603. Museums, Material Culture, and Popular Imagination. 3 Hours.

Museums as ideological sites and thus as sites of potential contestation produce cultural and moral systems that legitimate existing social orders. This course will focus on strategies of representation and the continuous process of negotiating social and cultural hierarchies with and through objects that are displayed. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 44403. Cultural Resource Management I. 3 Hours.

Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal and scientific management problems. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for degree credit.

ANTH 4480V. Individual Study of Anthropology. 1-6 Hour.

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 45203. Dental Science. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 45303. Middle East Cultures. 3 Hours.

Study of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East; ecology, ethnicity, economics, social organizations, gender, politics, religion, and patterns of social change. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 45503. Introduction to Raster GIS. 3 Hours.

Theory, data structures, algorithms, and techniques behind raster-based geographical information systems. Through laboratory exercises and lectures multidisciplinary applications are examined in database creation, remotely sensed data handling, elevation models, and resource models using boolean, map algebra, and other methods. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 46103. Primate Adaptation and Evolution. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the biology of the order of Primates. This course considers the comparative anatomy, behavioral ecology and paleontology of our nearest living relatives. Prerequisite: ANTH 10143 (or BIOL 10103 and BIOL 10101). (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 47003. Mammalian Evolution and Osteology. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on describing the evolutionary history of mammals, a group of vertebrates that include over 5,000 species in 29 orders, and will provide an overview of living species and their identifying features. Prerequisite: ANTH 10143 and ANTH 10141 or BIOL 10103 and BIOL 10101 or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 48503. Cultures of Africa. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the people and places of Africa from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Classic and contemporary works will be studied in order to underscore the unity and diversity of African cultures, as well as the importance African societies have played in helping us understand culture/society throughout the world. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 49003. Seminar in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 49103. Topics of the Middle East. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.