Yvette Murphy-Erby, Director of the School of Social Work
Sara Collie, Graduate Program Director
Carly Franklin, Undergraduate Program Director
Ananda Rosa, Field Education Program Director

106 SCSW
479-575-5039
School of Social Work Website

The School of Social Work offers an undergraduate major leading to a Bachelor of Social Work degree. The principal objective of the undergraduate social work program is to prepare students for beginning generalist social work practice.

Social work is the professional activity of helping individuals, groups, or communities enhance or restore their capacity for social functioning and creating societal conditions favorable to this goal. Social work is a gratifying career for people who care about others, want to relieve human suffering, like a challenge, and want their work to make a difference in the world. The profession is dedicated to assisting individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities in reaching their full potential.

Social work is particularly concerned with achieving social and economic justice for vulnerable populations and respecting and valuing human diversity. The School of Social Work at the University of Arkansas reflects the profession's fundamental concerns in its educational goals and objectives. In order to achieve its basic purposes, the school faculty, students, staff, and agency field instructors are involved in a variety of teaching, research, and outreach activities.

Accreditation

The social work program is fully accredited at the baccalaureate and graduate level by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE).

Requirements for B.S.W. in Social Work

Pre-Social Work (PSCWK)  

The pre-social work program identifies that a student has declared social work as a major but has not yet been accepted into the professional social work core. Students classified as pre-social work are completing the course requirements necessary to qualify for admission into the professional social work core. As members of the School of Social Work, pre-social work students are encouraged to participate in events, opportunities and activities sponsored the School of Social Work in accordance with the student’s progress in the program. Once a student is accepted into professional social work core, the student’s designation will change to Social Work major.

Criteria for Admission to B.S.W. Program and Professional Social Work Core

Students may declare themselves as pre-social work at any point, however formal admission to the professional core is required before a student is allowed to take the following courses that comprise the professional social work core:

SCWK 4073Social Work Research and Technology I3
SCWK 4103Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
SCWK 4333Social Work Practice I3
SCWK 4343Social Work Practice II3
SCWK 4733Social Work Practice III3
SCWK 4434Social Work Internship I4
SCWK 4412Field Seminar I2
SCWK 4444Social Work Internship II4
SCWK 4422Field Seminar II2

Each student must meet the following minimum academic course requirements and complete the application process outlined below.

Minimum Academic Course Requirements

  • Maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.5.
  • Complete the following 9 courses, each with a grade of “C” or better.
COMM 1313Public Speaking (ACTS Equivalency = SPCH 1003)3
ENGL 1013Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013)3
PLSC 2003American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)3
PSYC 2003General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)3
SCWK 2133Introduction to Social Work3
SCWK 3193Human Diversity and Social Work3
SCWK 4093Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SCWK 4153Social Welfare Policy3
SOCI 2013General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)3

Complete BIOL 1543/BIOL 1541L Principles of Biology and Lab or ANTH 1013/ANTH 1011L Biological Anthropology and Lab with a grade of “D” or better.

Students must have at least a 2.5 GPA in the 10 courses listed above.

Application Process

The application process must be completed by the announced application deadline prior to the semester in which the student will enroll in SCWK 4333 Social Work Practice I. The application packet includes the following materials:

Application Form. This form becomes the cover sheet for the application packet. Application forms are available from the online B.S.W. Student Handbook or from the social work webpage.

Volunteer/Work Experience Form. This form provides documentation of satisfactory completion of the volunteer experience assignment in SCWK 2133 Introduction to Social Work or equivalent and submission of a positive “Supervisor’s Reference Form” from the supervisor of the experience. A minimum of 30 hours of work or volunteer experience are required for admission to the Social Work Professional Core. (See appendices of B.S.W. Student Handbook for forms).

Personal Statement. This narrative statement should include: motivation for becoming a social worker; relevant work, volunteer or life experiences; strengths and limitations for effective social work practice; personal commitment and agreement to abide by the values and ethics of the social work profession; career goals and indication of fields of practice preference or areas where one would not feel comfortable working.

Ethical Principles/Guidelines for University of Arkansas Social Work Students. By signing this statement you are acknowledging that you have read, understand and agree to abide by and behave in accordance with the “Ethical Principles/Guidelines for Social Work Students.” This statement is contained in the admissions packet, and is available from the online B.S.W. Student Handbook (see appendices) or from the social work office. A copy of this signed statement will be included in the student's advising file.

Professional Habits Reference Form. This form must be completed by two Social Work professors. These references need to be from SCWK 4153 Social Welfare Policy and SCWK 4093 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (HBSE I) unless both courses were taken online. If this is the case, the student will choose another Social Work professor they have had in a face-to-face class along with their choice of either their SCWK 4093 or SCWK 4153 professor. If the student has had all Social Work courses in person, they will use both their Policy and HBSE I professors as references. It is the student’s responsibility to request the reference from the professors via email. The email should include the student’s full name and student ID#. The instructor will submit the form directly to the B.S.W. Director. If one or both of these courses (SCWK 4093 or SCWK 4153) were successfully completed at another institution, please see the B.S.W. Director for further instructions.  In addition, students should be aware that feedback from other faculty will be taken into account during the admission process. Students may view the professional habits reference form in the online B.S.W. Student Handbook (see appendices).

Documentation of Completion of Pre-Professional Courses. Students applying to the professional core must have completed the following courses:

BIOL 1543Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture)3
or ANTH 1013 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
COMM 1313Public Speaking (ACTS Equivalency = SPCH 1003)3
ENGL 1013Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013)3
PLSC 2003American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)3
PSYC 2003General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)3
SCWK 2133Introduction to Social Work3
SCWK 3193Human Diversity and Social Work3
SCWK 4093Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SCWK 4153Social Welfare Policy3
SOCI 2013General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)3

All courses above must be successfully completed with a "C" or better, with the exception of BIOL 1543 or ANTH 1013.  Note:  Students must have at least a 2.5 GPA in the pre-professional courses listed above.

There are University and College requirements for general education and the Social Work degree in addition to those listed in Items 5 above. Consult your University Catalog, Social Work Student Handbook or your adviser if you have questions about these.  The statistics requirement must be taken prior or during SCWK 4073 Social Work Research and Technology I.

Copy of current transcript documenting the minimum academic course requirements listed above.

The above materials are submitted to the B.S.W. Program Director and reviewed by the B.S.W. Admission Committee. If the Admissions Committee has any questions concerning the content of the materials, the student may be asked to interview with a faculty member to resolve any questions or to provide additional information.

Upon completion of the materials review and interview (if necessary), the student will be informed in writing by the B.S.W. Program Director of his or her admission status.

There are three possible admission decisions:

Unconditional Admission: These students have demonstrated through their application materials (and interview, if required) that they have the motivation and potential for competent professional social work practice and that they agree to uphold and conduct themselves in accordance with the values and ethics of professional social work practice. In addition, these students have at least a 2.5 GPA in the pre-professional courses and have an overall GPA of 2.5.

Conditional Admission: Students with deficiencies related to the admission criteria may be granted conditional admission to the major. Students must resolve any pending issues within the time frame identified by the admission committee. Students will receive a letter that outlines the deficiencies and a plan to resolve the concerns. The letter will include specific deadlines and must be signed by both the student and the B.S.W. director. The student will be unconditionally admitted once they have met the conditions outlined by the plan. Conditional admission may be granted for low GPA or non-GPA concerns such as writing skills, assertiveness, stress management, or working with diverse populations.

Non-acceptance: A decision of non-acceptance will be made when the student is found to be unsuited for professional social work practice. There are two criteria for non-acceptance: 1) the lack of acceptable academic performance necessary to successfully complete the requirements of the social work program, and/or 2) the inability to demonstrate commitment to social work values and ethics as they are reflected in the “Ethical Principles and Guidelines for UA Social Work Students” document that is available on-line in the B.S.W. Student Handbook and included with the forms for applying to the professional social work core (see Appendices). A decision of non-acceptance will result in the student’s inability to progress in the social work program. In the event of non-acceptance, assistance with a transfer to another major will be provided upon request.

Criteria for Retention and Continuation

In addition to the admission process, the B.S.W. Program also has requirements for retention and continuation in the major.

Retention

Maintenance of an overall GPA of 2.5.

Maintenance of a 2.5 GPA in social work courses.

Students must abide by and behave in accordance with the “Ethical Principles/Guidelines for UA Social Work Students”.

Social work students should not engage in any activity or behavior which, according to university policy or regulations, would result in dismissal from the university community. Such activity or behavior includes, but is not limited to, sexual harassment, physical or sexual assault, and academic dishonesty. (See Undergraduate Studies Catalog for description of Academic Dishonesty, and Undergraduate Studies Catalog, Appendix C: Student Handbook for details).

Continuation and Grading Policies

A grade of C or better must be earned in all social work courses. If a student receives a grade of D or F in one of the professional social work core courses, the course must be retaken with a grade of C or better prior to taking the course for which that course serves as a prerequisite.

  1. Once matriculated into the B.S.W. program, B.S.W. students who earn a D or F will be allowed to repeat this course one time. Students can repeat up to two different social work courses.
  2. A student may repeat a course from which they earned a W no more than one time.
  3. Any professional social work core course in which the student receives a grade of I (Incomplete) must be satisfactorily completed (with a grade of C or better) prior to entering the course for which the course receiving the Incomplete is a prerequisite.
  4. Any core social work course in which the student receives a grade of ‘I’ (Incomplete) must be satisfactorily completed (with a grade of C or better) prior to entering the course for which the course receiving the Incomplete is a prerequisite. For example, a student receiving an ‘I’ in SCWK 4093 may not take SCWK 4103 or SCWK 4333 until SCWK 4093 is completed with a final grade.
  5. If the student's core and/or overall GPA falls below the 2.5 GPA required for retention, the student may remain in the B.S.W. program and take up to an additional 15 credit hours to raise their GPA to the required level. Failure to do so within these parameters will result in dismissal from the B.S.W. program. Students will be referred to the Fulbright Advising Center to change their major course of study.

Criteria for Termination

Students will be terminated from the B.S.W. Program for the following reasons:

  1. Failure to maintain minimum GPA requirements (2.5 cumulative overall, 2.5 for all social work courses). See item 5 under Continuation and grading policies.  
  2. Failure to earn a C or better in a professional social work core course after the second attempt.
  3. Engaging in any activity or behavior which, according to university policy or regulations, would result in dismissal from the university community. Such activity or behavior includes, but is not limited to, sexual harassment, physical or sexual assault, and academic dishonesty.

Students may be terminated from the B.S.W. Program for the following reasons: Engaging in any activity or behavior incompatible with the “Ethical Principles/Guidelines for UA Social Work Students” (available online in the B.S.W. Student Handbook and with the materials for application to the professional social work core; see Appendices). Such violations will initiate a review by the School of Social Work Student, Standards and Support Committee and may result in termination by the School of Social Work Director or a decision that continuation is contingent upon completion of a corrective action specified by the School of Social Work Director.

Requirements for a Major in Social Work

In addition to the state minimum core and the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences Graduation Requirements, the following cognate and major course requirements must be met. Bolded courses from the list below may be applied to portions of the state minimum core requirements.

BIOL 1543
BIOL 1541L
Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture)
and Principles of Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lab)
4
or ANTH 1013
ANTH 1011L
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
and Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory
COMM 1313Public Speaking (ACTS Equivalency = SPCH 1003)3
ENGL 2003Advanced Composition3
or ENGL 2013 Essay Writing
HIST 1113Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 1113)3
HIST 1123Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 1123)3
PHIL 2003Introduction to Philosophy (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1103)3
or PHIL 2103 Introduction to Ethics (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003)
PLSC 2003American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)3
PSYC 2003General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)3
SOCI 2013General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)3
One Statistics Course3
Six hours of 3000- or 4000-level courses from AAST, ANTH, COMM, GEOS, HESC, PLSC, PSYC, SOCI and courses applicable to gender studies as approved by the School of Social Work6
Six hours of a single world language beginning at the 1013 Elementary II level or higher. 16
And 45 semester hours of social work courses including:
SCWK 2133Introduction to Social Work3
SCWK 3193Human Diversity and Social Work3
SCWK 4073Social Work Research and Technology I3
SCWK 4093Human Behavior and the Social Environment I3
SCWK 4103Human Behavior and the Social Environment II3
SCWK 4153Social Welfare Policy3
SCWK 4333Social Work Practice I3
SCWK 4343Social Work Practice II3
SCWK 4412Field Seminar I2
SCWK 4422Field Seminar II2
SCWK 4434Social Work Internship I4
SCWK 4444Social Work Internship II4
SCWK 4733Social Work Practice III3
Two Social Work Electives6

Students must adhere to requirements cited for each social work course. A grade of “C” or better must be earned in all core social work courses. If a student receives a grade of “D” in a core social work course, the course must be retaken with a grade of “C” or better prior to taking the course for which that course serves as a prerequisite.

Writing Requirement: Social work students complete the research/analytical writing requirement by passing  SCWK 4073 with a C or better.  

Social Work B.S.W.

Eight-Semester Degree Program

Students wishing to follow the eight-semester degree plan should see the Eight-Semester Degree Policy for university requirements of the program. State minimum core hours may vary by individual, based on placement and previous credit granted. Once all core requirements are met, students may substitute a three-hour (or more) general elective in place of a core area.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013)3  
MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103) (either math 1203 or Math 1313)
or MATH 1313 Quantitative Reasoning (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1113)
3  
Select one of the following:3  
PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)
PSYC 2003 General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)
SOCI 2013 General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)
University/State Core Fine Arts Course3  
1013 Elementary II World Language Course (or higher level, depending on placement)3  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023)  3
Select one of the following:  4
BIOL 1543 Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture)
& BIOL 1541L Principles of Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lab)
   
ANTH 1013 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
& ANTH 1011L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory
   
Select one of the following as needed:  3
PSYC 2003 General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)
SOCI 2013 General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)
PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)
COMM 1313 Public Speaking (ACTS Equivalency = SPCH 1003)  3
2003 Intermediate I World Language Course (or higher level)  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
Select one of the following as needed:3  
SOCI 2013 General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)
PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)
PSYC 2003 General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103)
SCWK 2133 Introduction to Social Work3  
ENGL 2003 Advanced Composition
or ENGL 2013 Essay Writing
3  
HIST 1113 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations I (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 1113)3  
University/State Core Social Science requirement3  
General Elective  3
Science University/State Core Lecture with Corequisite Lab requirement  4
SCWK 3193 Human Diversity and Social Work1, 2  3
Statistics (SOCI, STAT, etc) (4 Hours if SOCI)  3-4
HIST 1123 Institutions and Ideas of World Civilizations II (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 1123)  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
SCWK 4093 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I1, 23  
SCWK 4153 Social Welfare Policy1, 23  
SCWK Elective1, 23  
PHIL 2003 Introduction to Philosophy (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1103)
or PHIL 2103 Introduction to Ethics (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003)
3  
Upper Level Social Science1, 2, 33  
SCWK 4073 Social Work Research and Technology I1, 2  3
SCWK 4333 Social Work Practice I1, 2  3
SCWK 4103 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II1, 2  3
SCWK Elective1, 2  3
General Elective  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
SCWK 4343 Social Work Practice II1, 23  
SCWK 4733 Social Work Practice III1, 23  
SCWK 4434 Social Work Internship I1, 24  
SCWK 4412 Field Seminar I1, 22  
General Electives 3  
SCWK 4444 Social Work Internship II2  4
SCWK 4422 Field Seminar II2  2
Upper Level Social Science1,2,3  3
General Electives (as needed to total 120 degree credit hours)  3-4
Year Total: 15 13
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120

Requirements for a Minor in Child Advocacy Studies Training

The Child Advocacy Studies Training online minor program is designed to better prepare future child protection workers, law enforcement officers, and other child-serving professionals in child welfare. Students may only receive credit for the minor or the certificate below, but not both.

18 hours are required for the minor:

SCWK 3013Child Advocacy I: Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy3
SCWK 4013Child Advocacy II: Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment3
SCWK 4023Child Advocacy III: Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse3
Choose the three following courses:9
On Death and Dying
Contemporary Issues in Juvenile Justice
Addiction and the Family

Requirements for a Minor in Social Work

18 hours including SCWK 2133, SCWK 3193, and SCWK 4153 (required) and any other nine hours of social work electives. A student must notify the department of his or her intent to minor. The social work minor is not preparation for social work practice and is not recognized by the CSWE.

Requirements for a Minor in Substance Use Disorders

The minor in substance use disorders is designed to educate students in various aspects of substance use disorders.  Students must notify the School of Social Work of intention to pursue this minor.

18 hours are required for the minor.

Students must pass the following three courses with a C or better:
SCWK 4143Addiction and the Family3
SCWK 4213The Diagnosis and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders3
SCWK 4243Drug Policy and Its Impact on Approaches to Substance Use Disorder Treatment3
Choose three of the following courses and pass each one with a C or better:9
On Death and Dying
Contemporary Issues in Juvenile Justice
Child Advocacy I: Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy
Child Advocacy II: Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment
Child Advocacy III: Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse
Human Behavior and the Social Environment I
Social Welfare Policy
Child Welfare: 21st Century Perspectives
Human Diversity and Social Work
Total Hours18

Requirements for a Child Advocacy Studies Training Undergraduate Certificate

The Child Advocacy Studies Training online certificate program is designed to better prepare future child protection workers, law enforcement officers, and other child-serving professionals in child welfare. Students may only receive credit for the minor or the certificate, but not both. Admission requirements for the Child Advocacy Studies Training online certificate program:

  • Meet the admission requirements for the University of Arkansas.
  • Complete 60 semester hours of credit from a regionally accredited institution of higher education.

Course requirements for an undergraduate certificate in Child Advocacy Studies Training (CHAS) include 9 credit hours:

SCWK 3013Child Advocacy I: Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy3
SCWK 4013Child Advocacy II: Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment3
SCWK 4023Child Advocacy III: Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse3

Requirements for Departmental Honors in Social Work: The Departmental Honors Program in Social Work is an upper-division course of study with an independent investigation on a topic in social work. Students work closely with an adviser of their choice to define the goals of an honors project and to develop it to completion. They must take 12 hours (which may include 6 hours of thesis) in Honors Studies. In developing the project, students are encouraged to take honors courses, participate in honors colloquia, and do extensive background reading. The honors thesis may entail a library research project, a social work intervention project to be conducted in the field, or a policy analysis project. A research study that requires original data collection and analysis is preferred. In any case, the honors work is a serious long-term undertaking that should have direct value in supplementing the student’s regular departmental academic program. Enrollment in SCWK 399VH takes place after the student has done background reading and has actually begun a project. Students normally enroll in this course for three hours of credit. The course may be repeated for an additional 3 hours of credit if the student’s project is an extensive one. Regardless of the type of project, it is presented in written form and defended at an oral examination before an Honors Council Committee. Projects of extraordinarily high quality may be designated High Honors by the Committee. Successful completion of the requirements will be recognized by the award of the distinction “Social Work Scholar Cum Laude” at graduation. Higher degree distinctions are recommended only in truly exceptional cases and are based upon the whole of the candidate’s program of honors studies.

Allbright, Sara, M.S.W (University of Arkansas), B.S. (John Brown University), Lecturer, 2018.
Atwood, Casey, B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2013.
Barnett, Tracey, PhD. (University of Texas at Arlington), M.S.W. (University of Alabama), Assistant Professor, 2018.
Bostian-Neal, Elisabeth, M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2020.
Bryson, Sarah J., M.S.W. (Colorado State University), Lecturer, 2014.
Christy, Kameri, Ph.D., M.S.W. (University of Kansas), B.A. (University of Missouri-Kansas City), Professor, 2003.
Clingan, Shelley Diane, M.S.W. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), Lecturer, 2014.
Collie, Sara J., M.S.W. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), B.A. (University of Arkansas), Associate Professor, 2011.
Council, Julie, M.S.W (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), B.A. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2012.
Dickson, Ernestine, M.S.W. (Florida State University), B.S.W. (University of Florida), Lecturer, 2020.
Dunavant, Kristen, M.S.W. (Augsburg College), B.S.W. (St. Olaf College), Lecturer, 2017.
Elliot, Jonathan, M.S.W. (University of Texas at Austin), B.S.W. (University of Alabama), Lecturer, 2019.
Ferguson, Alishia Juanelle, Ph.D., M.S., B.A. (University of Texas Arlington), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2008.
Franklin, Carly T.S., M.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2014.
Freeman, Katherine, M.S.W. (University of Georgia), B.A. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2017.
Gallagher, John M., Ph.D., M.S.W. (Arizona State University), B.A. (State University of New York at Plattsburgh), Assistant Professor, 2016.
Gergerich, Erika M., Ph.D. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2019.
Guhman, Betty A., M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2019.
Higginbottom, Julienne, M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2019.
Hurd, Debra, Ph.D., M.P.A., B.A. (University of Arkansas), Clinical Professor, 1992.
Kimbrough, Hannah A.D., Ph.D. (University of Houston), M.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2014.
Moore, Brian, M.S.W, B.S.W (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2004.
Murphy-Erby, Yvette, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Greensboro), M.S.W. (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill), B.A. (University of North Carolina, Charlotte), Professor, 2004.
Page, Patricia, J.D. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), M.S.W. (Florida State University), B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2014.
Parker, Betty, M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2013.
Payne, Whitney, M.S.W (University of Arkansas), B.S.W (University of Alaska–Anchorage), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2012.
Plassmeyer, Mark, Ph.D. (University of Denver), M.S.W. (University of Pittsburg), Assistant Professor, 2019.
Plassmeyer, Mark, Ph.D. (University of Denver), M.S.W (University of Pittsburgh), B.A (Fort Lewis College), Assistant Professor, 2019.
Pryor, Jessie, M.S.W. (Missouri State University), B.S.W (College of the Ozarks), Lecturer, 2019.
Rinehart, Clare, M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2019.
Rosa, Ananda, M.S.W. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), B.A. (University of Arkansas), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2010.
Scott, Adrienne R., M.S.W. (University of Texas, Arlington), B.A. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2014.
Shobe, Marcia A., Ph.D. (University of Kansas), M.S.W. (University of Hawaii at Manoa), B.A. (State University of New York at Plattsburgh), Professor, 2007.
Shuler, Kimberly M., M.S.W. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Instructor, 2015.
Sites, Joanna, M.S.W., B.A. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2016.
Spears, Kari R., M.S.W., B.A. (University of Arkansas), Instructor, 2016.
Stauss, Kim, Ph.D. (University of Utah), M.S.W. (California State University at Sacramento), B.S. (Stephen F. Austin State University), Associate Professor, 2006.
Stephens, Mary Paige, M.S.W., B.A. (University of Missouri–Columbia), Lecturer, 2013.
Thomas, Johanna, Ph.D., M.S.W. (Louisiana State University), B.A. (University of Akron), Assistant Professor, 2015.
Thomas, Stephanie, M.S.W. (University of Maryland at Baltimore), B.S. (Old Dominion University), Lecturer, 2017.
Tonymon, Susan, M.S.W. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), B.S.W. (Arkansas State University), Instructor, 2014.
Torres, Maria, M.S.W., B.S.W. (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2020.
Tyler, Susan, M.S.W., B.S.W (University of Arkansas), Lecturer, 2018.
Valandra, Ph.D., M.S.W. (University of Minnesota), M.B.A., B.S. (University of Nebraska at Omaha), Associate Professor, 2013.

Courses

SCWK 2133. Introduction to Social Work. 3 Hours.

Introduction to social work as a profession and to social welfare institutions from the perspective of the generalist, entry level social worker. Emphasis on empowerment function of social work. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 3013. Child Advocacy I: Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Introductory course in child advocacy studies training. Covers the history, comparative perspectives, legal framework, responses to child maltreatment, skills necessary to do the work, other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy. (Typically offered: Fall)

SCWK 3163. On Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

Reviews the theory and humanistic importance of the concepts of death and dying in society. An experimental option and interdisciplinary faculty presenters will be part of the format. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with HUMN 3163.

SCWK 3193. Human Diversity and Social Work. 3 Hours.

An introduction to information basic concepts related to human diversity and social work. Provides content on differences and similarities in the experiences, needs, and beliefs of people distinguished by race, ethnicity, culture, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, physical or mental ability, age or national origin. The Live Section of this course is for Social Work Majors and Minors only. The Online Section (901) is open to Non-Social Work Majors. Prerequisite: Social Work major or minor for live sections only. Online sections (901) open to students in other departments. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 3233. Contemporary Issues in Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

This course is designed as a discussion of contemporary issues in juvenile justice. The focus is on the child and family system, including various theories related to underlying causes for involvement in the juvenile courts. This course will also describe the current workings of the juvenile court system and implications for the future. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 3633. Child Welfare: 21st Century Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Study of the needs of deprived children with some attention to methods and standards of care. Cultural competence and family-centered practice are emphasized. (Typically offered: Irregular)

SCWK 399VH. Honors Course. 1-18 Hour.

Honors course. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

SCWK 4013. Child Advocacy II: Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Child Advocacy Studies I. Focuses on the responses of professionals to allegations of child maltreatment. Covers competency-based skills training including forensic interviewing and documentation. Prerequisite: SCWK 3013. (Typically offered: Spring)

SCWK 4023. Child Advocacy III: Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse. 3 Hours.

Continuation of Child Advocacy Studies II. Provides training to recognize the effects of child maltreatment and to develop intervention strategies for children and their families. Outside experiential activities for this course involve court room observations. Prerequisite: SCWK 3013 and SCWK 4013. (Typically offered: Summer)

SCWK 405V. Special Topics in Social Work. 1-6 Hour.

Comprehensive study of various topics of importance in contemporary social welfare and social work practice. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

SCWK 4073. Social Work Research and Technology I. 3 Hours.

An overview of forms and sources of social work research including existing social data, techniques for collecting original social data, and techniques of organization, interpretation, and presentation of data. Students will also become proficient in the use of current technology for social work research and practice. Pre- or Corequisite: One of the following: STAT 2303, SOCI 3303 and SOCI 3301L, PSYC 2013, or ESRM 2403. Prerequisite: SCWK 4093 and SCWK 4153. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4093. Human Behavior and the Social Environment I. 3 Hours.

Provides a conceptual framework for knowledge of human behavior and the social environment with a focus on individuals. Social systems, life-course, assets, and resiliency-based approaches are presented. Special attention is given to the impact of discrimination and oppression on the ability to reach or maintain optimal health and well-being. Prerequisite: COMM 1313, PSYC 2003, SOCI 2013, SCWK 2133, and SCWK 3193 and (BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L, or ANTH 1013 and ANTH 1011L). (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4103. Human Behavior and the Social Environment II. 3 Hours.

This course applies the basic framework for creating and organizing knowledge of human behavior and the social environment acquired in HBSE I to the understanding of family, group, organizational, community, and global systems. Attention is given to discrimination, oppression, the impact of technology, and poverty at each system level. Prerequisite: SCWK 4093 and SCWK 4153. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4143. Addiction and the Family. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the biophysical basis of chemical and behavior compulsions with special focus on family impacts. Childhood development within addictive families is also examined. Social work intervention with substance abusing families is highlighted. (Typically offered: Irregular)

SCWK 4153. Social Welfare Policy. 3 Hours.

Describes and analyzes the policies and services rendered by local, state, regional, national, and international agencies as well as the policy implications for social work practice. Students prepare to advocate social policy changes designed to improve social conditions, promote social and economic justice, and to empower at-risk populations. Prerequisite: COMM 1313, PLSC 2003, SCWK 2133, and SCWK 3193. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4163. African American Perspectives of Trauma, Loss, and Recovery. 3 Hours.

Explores dimensions of trauma, loss, and recovery within the lived experiences of African American individuals, families, and communities in the United States. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with AAST 4163.

SCWK 4173. Social Work with African American Families. 3 Hours.

An overview of historical and contemporary issues of African American families using culturally competent and strengths based frameworks. Focuses on the Black family as a social institution. Covers current trends affecting Black families, historical influences, evaluation of social policies, and programs of today. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with AAST 4173.

SCWK 4183. Social Work With Elders. 3 Hours.

Survey of theories of gerontology, service programs and unmet needs of the aging citizen. (Typically offered: Irregular)

SCWK 4213. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders. 3 Hours.

Explores the use and abuse of drugs and alcohol with an emphasis on evidence-based treatment approaches to help engage and treat chemically dependent clients. Best practices to be reviewed will include Motivational Interviewing (MI), Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), harm reduction approaches, Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT), and Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT). (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4243. Drug Policy and Its Impact on Approaches to Substance Use Disorder Treatment. 3 Hours.

Explores the history of drug policy in the United States, focusing on the relationship between people, drugs, and the criminalization of certain substances. Examines how other countries have developed and utilized harm reduction and decriminalization approaches and policies. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4253. Spirituality and Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students to respond competently and ethically to diverse spiritual and religious perspectives. Utilizing social work ethics and values as a guide, students will develop a comparative, critically reflective approach to practice. Prerequisite: SCWK 3193 or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4333. Social Work Practice I. 3 Hours.

This is the first in the sequence of practice courses introducing students to the generalist approach to micro social work. This course focuses on developing a solid foundation for practice with individuals, including learning basic communication and helping skills, values, principles, and the connection of theory to practice. Pre- or Corequisite: SCWK 4103. Prerequisite: SCWK 4093 and SCWK 4153. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4343. Social Work Practice II. 3 Hours.

This is the second course in the social work practice sequence, emphasizing theories, models, and techniques related to generalist practice with families and groups. The course elaborates on system theory as it impacts groups and families, and use of experiential teaching methods. Prerequisite: SCWK 4103 and SCWK 4333. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 4412. Field Seminar I. 2 Hours.

An integrative seminar to assist students in comparing their practice experiences, integrating knowledge acquired in the classroom, and expanding knowledge beyond the scope of the practicum setting. Corequisite: SCWK 4434 and social work majors only. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4422. Field Seminar II. 2 Hours.

An integrative seminar to assist students in comparing their practice experiences, integrating knowledge acquired in the classroom, and expanding knowledge beyond the scope of the practicum setting. Corequisite: SCWK 4444. Prerequisite: SCWK majors only. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4434. Social Work Internship I. 4 Hours.

Arranged in connection with social service agencies. Credit is based on completion of all course objectives, including a minimum of 220 hours of field work under the supervision of a licensed social worker. Corequisite: SCWK 4412. Prerequisite: Social work major, SCWK 4073, SCWK 4103, and SCWK 4333. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4444. Social Work Internship II. 4 Hours.

Arranged in connection with social service agencies. Credit is based on completion of all course objectives, including a minimum of 220 hours of field work under the supervision of a licensed social worker. Corequisite: SCWK 4422. Prerequisite: SCWK majors only, SCWK 4343, SCWK 4733 and SCWK 4434. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

SCWK 4733. Social Work Practice III. 3 Hours.

Students acquire and practice the skills, knowledge, and values necessary for culturally competent generalist social work practice with organizations and communities. Special attention is given to the implications of discrimination and oppression for attaining social and economic justice. Pre- or Corequisite: SCWK 4103 and SCWK 4343. Prerequisite: SCWK 4333. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

SCWK 496V. Independent Study. 1-6 Hour.

Independent Study designed to meet the particular needs of individual students. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.