JoAnn D'Alisera
Acting Chair of the Department
330 Old Main
479-575-2508
anth@uark.edu

Department of Anthropology Website

Courses in anthropology provide an introduction to world peoples, their ways of living, and world views. Anthropology helps students to better understand human similarities and differences.

The Department of Anthropology offers both a Bachelor of Science and a Bachelor of Arts degree in anthropology.

The Bachelor of Science degree program is geared toward students with specializations in anthropological sciences. It is recommended for students planning to continue their education in basic or applied anthropological sciences in graduate or professional school. A B.S. degree in anthropology is also useful students planning to continue their education toward health or medical related careers.

The Bachelor of Arts degree program allows students to take additional coursework in any of four areas of focused study: archeology, biological anthropology, cartography/remote sensing/GIS, or cultural anthropology.

For the combined major in Anthropology and African and African American Studies, see the African and African American Studies listing.

For requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in anthropology, see the Graduate School Catalog.

Requirements for a B.S. Degree with a Major in Anthropology

The department of anthropology offers the Bachelor of Science degree in anthropology. The Bachelor of Science degree program is geared toward students with focused studies in anthropological sciences. It is recommended for students planning to continue their education in basic or applied anthropological sciences in graduate or professional school. A B.S. degree in anthropology is also useful students planning to continue their education toward health or medical related careers.

Program Requirements: A minimum of 120 hours is required, including 35 hours of state minimum core and 57 hours specified as designated below.

Required Anthropology Core Courses:

ANTH 1013
ANTH 1011L
Introduction to Biological Anthropology
and Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory
4
ANTH 1023Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013)3
ANTH 1033Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 4013History of Anthropological Thought3
Anthropology Electives: 18 hours selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher18
Science A minimum of 20 hours of electives from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL, and/or PHYS20
Mathematics
Minimum of 6 hours of math beyond College Algebra (MATH 1203) selected from among the following courses: 6
Plane Trigonometry (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1203)
Precalculus Mathematics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1305)
Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405)
Calculus II (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2505)
Principles of Statistics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2103)

The following courses that are strongly recommended for those students pursuing a health or medical-related career:

ANTH 3423
ANTH 3421L
Human Osteology
and Human Osteology Laboratory
4
BIOL 1603
BIOL 1601L
Principles of Zoology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1054 Lecture)
and Principles of Zoology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1054 Lab)
4
BIOL 2013
BIOL 2011L
General Microbiology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2004 Lecture)
and General Microbiology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2004 Lab)
4
BIOL 2213
BIOL 2211L
Human Physiology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2414 Lecture)
and Human Physiology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2414 Lab)
4
BIOL 2323
BIOL 2321L
General Genetics
and General Genetics Laboratory
4
BIOL 2443
BIOL 2441L
Human Anatomy (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2404 Lecture)
and Human Anatomy Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2404 Lab)
4
BIOL 3023Evolutionary Biology3
BIOL 3404Comparative Vertebrate Morphology4
BIOL 4234Comparative Physiology4
BIOL 4263Cell Physiology3
BIOL 4713
BIOL 4711L
Basic Immunology
and Basic Immunology Laboratory
4
CHEM 3603
CHEM 3601L
Organic Chemistry I
and Organic Chemistry I Laboratory
4
CHEM 3813Elements of Biochemistry3

Writing Requirement: The Fulbright College research/analytical paper requirement for anthropology majors is fulfilled by completing an intensive writing requirement (15 pages) with a grade of "B" or higher in a successfully completed 4000-level ANTH course and with instructor approval.  

Anthropology B.S.

Eight-Semester Degree Program

Students wishing to follow the eight-semester degree plan should see the Eight-Semester Degree Policy in the Academic Regulations chapter for university requirements of the program. Core requirement hours may vary by individual, based on placement and previous credit granted. Once all core requirements are met, students may substitute a three-hour (or more) general elective in place of a core area.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.4 and 4.2:
ANTH 1013 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
& ANTH 1011L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory
4  
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)3  
Select one of the following (Satisfies General Education Outcome 2.1):3  
MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103)
MATH 1284C Precalculus Mathematics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1305)
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405)
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013) (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.3 and 4.1)3  
Humanities or Fine Arts State Minimum Core requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.2 or 3.1)1, 23  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)  3
MATH 1284C Precalculus Mathematics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1305)  4
or MATH 2554 Calculus I1
Science State Minimum Core lecture and corequisite lab from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.4)  4
Select one of the following (Satisfies General Education Outcome 4.2):  3
HIST 2003 History of the American People to 1877 (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2113)
HIST 2013 History of the American People, 1877 to Present (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2123)
PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)
Social Sciences State Minimum Core (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)3  3
Year Total: 16 17
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
Select one of the following:14  
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405)
MATH 2564 Calculus II (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2505)
STAT 2303 Principles of Statistics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2103)
Fine Arts State Minimum Core (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.1)23  
Science Elective and accompanying Laboratory from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS 4  
General Elective3  
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology  3
Science Elective and accompanying Laboratory from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS  3
Science Elective and accompanying laboratory from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS  3
Social Sciences State Minimum Core (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)3  6
Year Total: 14 15
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
ANTH Electives among 3000-4000-level courses4, 56  
3000-4000-level Fulbright College Electives4, 53  
General Electives6  
ANTH Electives among 3000-4000-level courses4, 5  9
3000-4000 level General Electives4  3
Science Elective and accompanying Laboratory from BIOL, CHEM, GEOL or PHYS  4
Year Total: 15 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
ANTH 4013 History of Anthropological Thought (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 1.2, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 5.1, and 6.1)4, 53  
3000-4000 level General Electives43  
3000-4000 level General Electives (or 2000-level Advanced level elective)49  
ANTH Electives among 3000-4000-level courses4, 5  3
General Electives  9
Year Total: 15 12
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120

Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree with a Major in Anthropology

Required courses include 35 hours of state minimum core and a total of 120 hours including the following.

34 Semester Hours including:
ANTH 1013Introduction to Biological Anthropology3
ANTH 1011LIntroduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory1
ANTH 1023Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013)3
ANTH 1033Introduction to Archaeology3
ANTH 4013History of Anthropological Thought3

These 34 hours must also include:

  • One course in each ANTH subfield (Cultural, Archaeology, Biological) beyond the core (9 hours).
  • 3 hours from each of two different geographical areas in ANTH for a total of 6 hours.
  • 6 elective credit hours in anthropology. These may satisfied in concert with an optional focused study as described below.

Focused Studies

Focused Study in Archeology:

To complete the focused study, a student is required to fulfill the following course requirements:

ANTH 3023Approaches to Archeology3
Two of the following method and theory courses or equivalent classes offered under ANTH 3903 and ANTH 4903, approved as having an archeological method and theory focus.6
The Archeology of Death
Laboratory Methods in Archeology
Cultural Resource Management I
Landscape Archaeology
Archeological Prospecting and Remote Sensing
Ethnographic Approaches to the Past
Archeological Field Session6
Archeological Field Session

Focused Study in Biological Anthropology:

To complete the focused study, a student is required to fulfill the following course requirements:

Four of the following courses in biological anthropology, including any 3000-4000 special topics or seminar courses offered that are deemed appropriate for training in any of the subdisciplines of biological anthropology (12-13 credits).

ANTH 3423
ANTH 3421L
Human Osteology
and Human Osteology Laboratory
4
ANTH 3433Human Evolution3
ANTH 3533Medical Anthropology3
ANTH 3923HHonors Colloquium3
ANTH 4523Dental Science3
ANTH 4613Primate Adaptation and Evolution3

Focused Study in Cartography/Remote Sensing/GIS:

This focused study gives students an opportunity to develop expertise in (1) cartography, map design and computer-assisted map production, (2) remote sensing and image interpretation, including photographic systems, sensor systems, and digital image processing, and (3) geographic information systems, including data sources, analytical techniques, and hardware/software systems.

To complete the focused study, a student is required to fulfill the following course requirements.

Required Courses:
GEOS 3023Introduction to Cartography3
GEOS 3213Principles of Remote Sensing3
ANTH 3543Geospatial Applications and Information Science3
Elective Courses - Select three of the following: 9
Cartographic Design and Production
Introduction to Raster GIS
Vector GIS
Introduction to Global Positioning Systems and Global Navigation Satellite Systems
Statistical Methods
Surveying Systems (or other approved surveying course)

Focused Study in Cultural Anthropology:

To complete the focused study, a student is required to fulfill the following course requirements:

Students must take a world language through the 2013 level12
Two of the following method and theory courses or equivalent classes offered under ANTH 3903 and ANTH 4903 approved as having a cultural anthropology method and theory focus.6
The Anthropology of Religion
Medical Anthropology
Ecological Anthropology
Museums, Material Culture, and Popular Imagination
Ethnographic Approaches to the Past

Writing Requirement: The Fulbright College research/analytical paper requirement for anthropology majors is fulfilled by completing an intensive writing requirement (15 pages) with a grade of "B" or higher in a successfully completed 4000-level ANTH course and with instructor approval.  

Anthropology B.A.

Eight-Semester Degree Program

Students wishing to follow the eight-semester degree plan should see the Eight-Semester Degree Policy in the Academic Regulations chapter for university requirements of the program. Core requirement hours may vary by individual, based on placement and previous credit granted. Once all core requirements are met, students may substitute a three-hour (or more) general elective in place of a core area.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.4 and 4.2:
ANTH 1013 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
& ANTH 1011L Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory
4  
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)3  
MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 2.1)3  
ANTH 1023 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013) (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.3 and 4.1)3  
State Minimum Core Humanities or Fine Arts requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.2 or 3.1)1, 23  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)  3
State Minimum Core Humanities or Fine Arts requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.2 or 3.1)1, 2  3
Science State Mininum Core Lecture with corequisite Lab requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.4)  4
State Minimum Core Social Sciences requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)3  3
Select one State Minimum Core U.S. History or Government course (Satisfies General Education Outcome 4.2):  3
HIST 2003 History of the American People to 1877 (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2113)
HIST 2013 History of the American People, 1877 to Present (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2123)
PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003)
Year Total: 16 16
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
ANTH 1033 Introduction to Archaeology (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.2 and 4.1)3  
State Minimum Core Social Sciences requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)33  
ANTH Cultural Anthropology subfield course among 3000-4000 level classes4, 53  
General Electives6  
ANTH Biological Anthropology subfield course among 3000-4000 level classes4, 5  3
ANTH Archeology subfield course among 3000-4000 level classes4, 5  3
ANTH Geographical area course among 3000-4000 level classes4, 5  3
ANTH Electives among 3000-4000 level classes4, 5  6
Year Total: 15 15
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
ANTH Geographical area course among 3000-4000 level classes4, 53  
3000-4000 Level General Electives4, 56  
(or 2000-level Advanced Level Electives)4
General Electives6  
3000-4000 level General Electives4  6
General Electives  10
Year Total: 15 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
ANTH 4013 History of Anthropological Thought (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 1.2, 3.2, 3.3, 4.1, 5.1, and 6.1)4, 53  
Advanced Level Electives43  
General Electives9  
Advanced Level Electives (as needed to meet 40 hour rule) 4  3
or General Electives
General Electives  9
Year Total: 15 12
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120

Minor in Anthropology

Requirements for a Minor in Anthropology: 15 hours including ANTH 1023. At least 9 hours must be in courses numbered 3000 or above. Students who minor in anthropology should consult with an anthropology adviser to select appropriate courses. A student must notify the department of his or her intent to minor.

Requirements for Departmental Honors in Anthropology: The Departmental Honors Program in Anthropology provides an opportunity for outstanding undergraduate majors to conduct independent research under the supervision of a faculty member. The research project culminates in an honors thesis, which is primary for the award “Anthropology Scholar Cum Laude.”Higher degree distinctions are recommended only in truly exceptional cases and are based upon the candidate’s entire program of honors studies.

Honors candidates must meet the college requirements for an honors degree. They must complete and defend an honors thesis and take 12 hours, which may include 6 hours of thesis, in Honors Studies. The candidate is expected to maintain a minimum 3.5 cumulative grade-point average in anthropology and other course work.

Please refer to the Secondary Education Requirements for Fulbright College Students.

Students wishing to pursue licensure through the UAteach undergraduate curriculum should consult with a UAteach adviser, uteach@uark.edu.

Faculty

D'Alisera, JoAnn, Ph.D., A.M. (University of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign), B.A. (State University of New York at New Paltz), Associate Professor, 1999, 2005.
Delezene, Lucas, Ph.D., M.A. (Arizona State University), B.S. (Emory University), Instructor, 2011.
Erickson, Kirstin C., Ph.D., M.A. (University of Wisconsin-Madison), B.A. (St. Olaf College), Associate Professor, 2001, 2008.
Kathryn, Koziol, Ph.D. (University of Arkansas), Teaching Assistant Professor, 2019.
Kowalski, Jessica Anne, Ph.D. (University of Alabama), Research Assistant Professor, 2019.
Marion, Jonathan S., Ph.D., M.A. (University of California-San Diego), B.A. (University of Redlands), Associate Professor, 2012, 2016.
Natarajan, Venkatesan Ram, Ph.D., M.A. (New York University), B.A. (Johns Hopkins University), Assistant Professor, 2015.
Paul, Kathleen, Ph.D., M.A. (Arizona State University), B.A. (New York University), Assistant Professor, 2019.
Plavcan, Joseph M., Ph.D., B.A. (Duke University), Professor, 2001, 2010.
Stoner, Wesley, Ph.D., M.A. (University of Kentucky), B.A. (Pennsylvania State University), Assistant Professor, 2014.
Swedenburg, Ted R., Ph.D., M.A., (University of Texas at Austin), B.A. (University of Beirut), Professor, 1996, 2003.
Terhune, Claire E., Ph.D., M.A. (Arizona State University), B.A., B.S. (College of Charleston), Assistant Professor, 2013.
Ungar, Peter S., Ph.D., M.A. (State University of New York at Stony Brook), B.A. (State University of New York, Binghampton), Distinguished Professor, 1995, 2009.
Villaseñor, Amelia, Ph.D. (George Washington University), B.A. (Arizona State University), Assistant Professor, 2019.
Vining, Benjamin R., Ph.D., M.A. (Boston University), B.A. Colgate University, Assistant Professor, 2016.

Courses

ANTH 1011L. Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 1013. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 1011M. Honors Introduction to Biological Anthropology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of physical anthropology. Corequisite: ANTH 1013. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to ANTH 1011L.

ANTH 1013. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of biological anthropology using evolution and human variation as unifying concepts. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate and human evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 1011L. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer)

ANTH 1013H. Honors Introduction to Biological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of biological anthropology using evolution and human variation as unifying concepts. Areas include human genetics, race, speciation, primate and human evolution, and human variation and adaptation. Corequisite: ANTH 1011M. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to ANTH 1013.

ANTH 1023. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ACTS Equivalency = ANTH 2013). 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality: comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. Corequisite: Drill component. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

ANTH 1023H. Honors Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the nature of culture and its influence on human behavior and personality; comparative study of custom, social organization, and processes of change and integration of culture. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to ANTH 1023.

ANTH 1033. Introduction to Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Archaeology studies the human past through contextual analysis of artifacts, archaeological sites, and landscapes. This course introduces archaeological methods and theories, significant discoveries and current debates in the discipline. Corequisite: Lab component. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

ANTH 2013. Introduction to Latin American Studies. 3 Hours.

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Latin America. Drawing on Latin American literature, history, sociology, and political science, the course examines the broad forces that have shaped the region. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3003. World Prehistory. 3 Hours.

Survey of the prehistoric and early historic cultures of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3013. Myths, Mysteries, and Manipulations of the Past. 3 Hours.

Examines many archaeological fantasies, evaluates the evidence for and against such fringe theories, and confronts pseudoscience in everyday life. Dispels popular fantasies and "fake news" about the past. (Typically offered: Fall Odd Years)

ANTH 3023. Approaches to Archeology. 3 Hours.

Study of the field of archeology including method, theory, analysis and interpretation with substantive worldwide examples. Prerequisite: ANTH 1033. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 3043. Bones, Bodies, and Brains in Evolutionary Perspective. 3 Hours.

This course will review the anatomy of the human body, comparing this anatomy with primates, mammals, and vertebrates, and it will consider how the major features of the human body emerged throughout evolution. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with BIOL 3043.

ANTH 3123. The Anthropology of Religion. 3 Hours.

An exploration of rituals, symbols, and rules that shape religious life. Religion is viewed broadly, considering activities that invoke powers beyond the reach of ordinary senses. Examining a variety of cultures, we explore what people say and do as they participate in activities such as magic, healing, pilgrimage, and contemporary religious movements. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 3213. Indigenous Peoples of North America: Anthropological Perspectives. 3 Hours.

An exploration of indigenous societies and cultures of North America from an anthropological perspective. Using examples from diverse Native Nations from the time of European contact to the present, we will examine colonialism and resistance, indigenous cosmologies, memory culture and oral tradition, and the politics of representation. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3263. Indians of Arkansas and the South. 3 Hours.

Study of the traditional lifeways and prehistoric backgrounds of Indians living in the Southern United States, including Arkansas. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

ANTH 3323. Evolution of the Human Mating System. 3 Hours.

Examines basic principles governing the evolution of sexual behavior and anatomy in mammals, compares the features of human mating systems to those of primates, and explores models for the origin of fundamental features of the human social system. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 3421L. Human Osteology Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises illustrating concepts of human osteology. Corequisite: ANTH 3423. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 3423. Human Osteology. 3 Hours.

Study of the human skeleton, identification of bones, allometric growth, sexual dimorphism, osteological genetic inheritance and environmental stresses. Lectures and demonstration. Corequisite: ANTH 3421L. (Typically offered: Spring)

ANTH 3433. Human Evolution. 3 Hours.

A study of hominid evolution from origin to the present, including trends in comparative primate evolution and functional development of human form as a result of cultural and biological interaction. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 3473. North American Prehistory. 3 Hours.

Survey of the aboriginal prehistory of the North American Continent north of Mexico. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3533. Medical Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Survey of the interrelationship of human biology, culture and environment as reflected in disease experience from an evolutionary and cross cultural perspective. Special emphasis on stress. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3543. Geospatial Applications and Information Science. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the methods and theory underlying the full range of geographic information science and collateral areas - including GNSS, remote sensing, cadastral, spatial demographics and others. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is cross-listed with GEOS 3543.

ANTH 3553. Religion in Latin America. 3 Hours.

Examines contemporary implications of Latin America's unique religious heritage. An exploration of multiple Latin American religious traditions, with sustained focus on key theoretical concerns: conversion, vernacular vs. orthodox expressions, the blending of indigenous and European cosmologies, devotion and ritual, and the articulation of ethnic, gendered, and religious identities. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3563. Culture and Medicine. 3 Hours.

Study of health and medicine within cultural contexts, including attention to cross-cultural healers and healing systems. Special emphasis on biomedicine as a cultural system. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3583. Body and Identity. 3 Hours.

This course explores personal, social and cultural constructions and performances of the body and identity, highlighting key intersections of embodiment including gender, race, sexuality and abilities. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 3903. Topics in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 3923H. Honors Colloquium. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in anthropology). (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

ANTH 399VH. Honors Thesis. 1-6 Hour.

Honors thesis. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 4013. History of Anthropological Thought. 3 Hours.

Detailed consideration of anthropological theory through study of its historical development. The research paper fulfills the Fulbright College Writing Requirement for anthropology majors. Prerequisite: ANTH 1023. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 4043. Ancient Cities. 3 Hours.

Explores pre-modern cities from the earliest in the world to those on the brink of industrialization. Employs anthropological archaeology as its primary approach, but also draws upon formal/functional analysis of urban plans, historical documentation, urban planning and history, and semiotics to interpret the built-environment as a form of non-verbal communication. (Typically offered: Spring Even Years)

ANTH 4053. Anthropology of the City. 3 Hours.

Explores the implications of several pivotal urban and cultural trends and how representations of the city have informed dominant ideas about city space, function, and meaning. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4093. The Archeology of Death. 3 Hours.

Study of the analysis and interpretation of archeological mortuary remains and sites. Key archeological and anthropological sources that have influenced major theoretical developments are reviewed. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4143. Ecological Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Anthropological perspectives on the study of relationships among human populations and their ecosystems. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4243. Archeology of the Midsouth. 3 Hours.

Survey of prehistoric and protohistoric cultures of the lower Mississippi Valley and adjacent regions. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4256. Archeological Field Session. 6 Hours.

Practical field and laboratory experiences in archeological research. (Typically offered: Summer) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 4263. Identity and Culture in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the interplay between Latino/a, Mexican, Anglo, and Native American identities and cultures along the U.S.-Mexico border. Course examines identity formation, hybridity, social tension, marginalization, race and gender, from an anthropological perspective, paying special attention to the border as theoretical construct as well as material reality. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4273. Photography for Fieldwork. 3 Hours.

This class explores the use of photographic images as both data and representational tools in anthropological research, emphasizing the ethical, theoretical, and methodological issues involved. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4283. Survey in Ethnographic Film. 3 Hours.

Survey of the development and evolution of ethnographic film, based on class screenings to build familiarity, vocabulary, and literacy with this branch of visual anthropology. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4353. Laboratory Methods in Archeology. 3 Hours.

Theory and practice of describing, analyzing, and reporting upon archeological materials. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4363. Museums, Material Culture, and Popular Imagination. 3 Hours.

Museums as ideological sites and thus as sites of potential contestation produce cultural and moral systems that legitimate existing social orders. This course will focus on strategies of representation and the continuous process of negotiating social and cultural hierarchies with and through objects that are displayed. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 4443. Cultural Resource Management I. 3 Hours.

Concentrated discussion of management problems relative to cultural resources, including review and interpretation of relevant federal legislation, research vs. planning needs, public involvement and sponsor planning, and assessment of resources relative to scientific needs. No field training involved; discussion will deal only with administrative, legal and scientific management problems. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for degree credit.

ANTH 448V. Individual Study of Anthropology. 1-6 Hour.

Reading course for advanced students with special interests in anthropology. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 4513. African Religions: Gods, Witches, Ancestors. 3 Hours.

An exploration of African religions from a variety of anthropological perspectives, exploring how religious experience is perceived and interpreted by adherents, highlighting the way in which individual and group identities are constructed, maintained and contested within religious contexts. Readings reflect the vast diversity of religious life in Africa. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4523. Dental Science. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the study of the human dentition including its anatomy, morphology, growth and development, and histology. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 4533. Middle East Cultures. 3 Hours.

Study of the peoples and cultures of the Middle East; ecology, ethnicity, economics, social organizations, gender, politics, religion, and patterns of social change. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 4553. Introduction to Raster GIS. 3 Hours.

Theory, data structures, algorithms, and techniques behind raster-based geographical information systems. Through laboratory exercises and lectures multidisciplinary applications are examined in database creation, remotely sensed data handling, elevation models, and resource models using boolean, map algebra, and other methods. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with GEOS 4553.

ANTH 4563. Vector GIS. 3 Hours.

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS) applications in marketing, transportation, real estate, demographics, urban and regional planning, and related areas. Lectures focus on development of principles, paralleled by workstation-based laboratory exercises using mainstream GIS software and relational databases. Prerequisite: GEOS 3023 or GEOS 3543. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with GEOS 4583.

ANTH 4583. Cultures of Africa. 3 Hours.

An exploration of the people and places of Africa from a variety of anthropological perspectives. Classic and contemporary works will be studied in order to underscore the unity and diversity of African cultures, as well as the importance African societies have played in helping us understand culture/society throughout the world. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with AAST 4583.

ANTH 4593. Introduction to Global Positioning Systems and Global Navigation Satellite Systems. 3 Hours.

Introduction to navigation, georeferencing, and digital data collection using GPS and GNSS receivers, data loggers, and laser technology. Components of NavStar GLONASS, Beidou and other global positioning system are used in integration of digital information into various GIS platforms with emphasis on practical applications. Prerequisite: GEOS 3543 or ANTH 3543. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with GEOS 4593.

ANTH 4603. Landscape Archaeology. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the methods and theories of landscape archaeology. Topics include archaeological survey techniques, environmental and social processes recorded in the archaeological landscape, and analysis of ancient settlement and land use data to reveal changes in population, resource utilization, and environmental relationships. (Typically offered: Fall)

ANTH 4613. Primate Adaptation and Evolution. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the biology of the order of Primates. This course considers the comparative anatomy, behavioral ecology and paleontology of our nearest living relatives. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 (or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L). (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with BIOL 4613.

ANTH 4633. Archeological Prospecting and Remote Sensing. 3 Hours.

Ground-based geophysical, aerial, and other remote sensing methods are examined for detecting, mapping, and understanding archeological and other deposits. These methods include magnetometry, resistivity, conductivity, radar, aerial photography, thermography, and multispectral scanning. Requires computer skills, field trips, and use of instruments. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4653. GIS Analysis and Modeling. 3 Hours.

Unlike conventional GIS courses that focus on studying "where", this course will teach students to address beyond "where" using various GIS analysis and modeling techniques to explore "why" and "how". The course will provide theoretical and methodological reviews of the principles of cartographic modeling and multi-criteria decision-making. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with GEOS 4653.

ANTH 4703. Mammalian Evolution and Osteology. 3 Hours.

This course will focus on describing the evolutionary history of mammals, a group of vertebrates that include over 5,000 species in 29 orders, and will provide an overview of living species and their identifying features. Prerequisite: ANTH 1013 and ANTH 1011L or BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4803. Historical Archeology. 3 Hours.

Review of the development of historical archeology and discussion of contemporary theory, methods, and substantive issues. Lab sessions on historic artifact identification and analysis. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4813. Ethnographic Approaches to the Past. 3 Hours.

Review of the uses of ethnographic data in the reconstruction and interpretation of past cultures and cultural processes, with particular emphasis on the relationships between modern theories of culture and archeological interpretation. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 482V. Applied Visual Research. 1-6 Hour.

This class provides hands-on skill and training conducting visually informed fieldwork designed to help represent unique cultural settings, experience, and heritage. Pre- or Corequisite: ANTH 4273 or ANTH 4283. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4863. Quantitative Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Introductory statistics course for anthropology students examines probability theory, nature of anthropological data, data graphics, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, test for means and variances, categorical and rank methods, ANOVA, correlation and regression. Lectures focus on theory methods; utilize anthropological data and a statistical software laboratory. (Typically offered: Irregular)

ANTH 4903. Seminar in Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Research, discussion, and projects focusing on a variety of topics. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

ANTH 4913. Topics of the Middle East. 3 Hours.

Covers a special topic or issue. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.