Mission and Objectives

The Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design, founded in 1946 by John G. Williams at the University of Arkansas, houses professional design programs of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design together with liberal studies programs. The architecture and landscape architecture departments offer five-year accredited professional degree programs and four-year pre-professional degrees; the interior design department offers a four-year accredited professional degree, all of which  combine studio design education with innovative teaching in history and theory; building and intelligent technologies and urban design and resiliency. A broad range of course offerings equips graduates with the knowledge and critical agility required to meet the challenges of designing for a changing world. Design instruction occurs in studio sequences that provide educational experiences appropriate for students who wish to pursue both traditional and non-traditional forms of professional practice. Fundamental principles and techniques design and design thinking are stressed and all curriculums empower students by developing skill, knowledge, and a deep sense of responsibility to their environment and to the cultures they will serve. The school's curriculum surveys issues and opportunities in built and natural settings, as well as addressing complex social, physical, and cultural relationships that constitute the human-made environment. In summary, the school prepares its students with critical frameworks for professional skills, and applied learning experiences that equip them to assume leadership roles in the profession and in their communities.

Facilities and Resources

The three academic units of the Fay Jones School — architecture, interior design and landscape architecture — together with its administrative offices are located in Vol Walker Hall and its state of the art addition, the Steven L. Anderson Design Center. Harmoniously combining traditional and contemporary architecture, our renewed facilities not only offer students in the Fay Jones School extraordinary opportunities for collaboration among its three design disciplines, but also model best practices for new and historic preservation construction, all adhering to high standards of sustainable design. Similarly, the university’s location in Northwest Arkansas, affords opportunity to study the impact of urbanization in a traditionally agricultural setting. At the same time, we value making connections with the entire state and our nation, pursuing learning experiences for our students that foster civic engagement and responsibility. So too, the school is aware of the increasing global nature of design practice and offers field trips, guest lectures, learning opportunities in applied design and research, and, especially, a variety of study abroad programs in the University of Arkansas Rome Center as well as our Latin America Program and diverse options across Europe.

Design Studio

The design studio sequence is the core of each discipline within the school. Studio projects are complemented by topical lectures that inform the design process. These learning experiences develop and nurture the intellectual and creative skills of students and allow them to approach problem solving in a disciplined, logical, and analytical manner.

 The amount and complexity of material covered, the fast pace of assignments, and the presentation of work for critical discussion among faculty and other students combine to produce a challenging learning atmosphere.

Library Resources

The Fine Arts Library, a branch of the University Libraries, serves the school. Collections include traditional print resources on architecture, landscape architecture, interior design and the visual arts (painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, printmaking and photography) electronic resources including  Art Full Text, Avery Index, Bibliography of History of Art and Grove Dictionary of Art among others. The Fine Arts Library also maintains course reserves for Fay Jones School classes.  The library offers full wireless coverage.

The C. Murray Smart Multimedia Center, located in Vol Walker Hall contains an online digital image database with more than 90,000 images relating to architecture, architectural history, interior design, landscape and urban design. This resource, along with an archival collection of approximately 40,000 slides and photographs and 800 video programs, is available to faculty and students of the school. The center also provides assistance to students with digital imaging technology, including the use of scanners and digital cameras.

Digital Drawing and Fabrication Resources

Design Shop web page

The school maintains two fabrication labs, the DesignSHOP for use by all students and the DFAB Lab, a research facility located off campus. The DesignSHOP houses traditional and digital fabrication equipment including two three-axis computer numerically controlled (CNC) router, five laser cutters, vacuum-form, and a three-dimensional FDM printer that allow students and faculty to transform digital models into physical 3D components, prototypes and scale models. Students work with wood, fiber board, metals, plastics, cardboard and paper products. They are encouraged to work with both conventional and CNC machines to develop prototypes, casting molds, furniture, models, and other products. The DFAB Lab houses a 5-axis CNC router and plasma cutter, a three-dimensional plastic printer, digital paper cutter, metal press,  vacuum-form, and robotic arm. The labs are staffed during the day and evening hours by students and full-time professional assistants; hours vary by semester.

The school also supports multiple stations for 2D digital scanning and printing. The stations house a selection of flatbed and roll scanners, large-format plotters, and color and B&W laser printers. There is a computer technology specialist and  student assistants who run and maintain these 24-7 output stations. Students are charged a minimal per-print fee. The average annual expenditure for students in the professional degree programs is $150. All ink, toner and several types of paper are provided to give students the opportunity to craft digital and hybrid representations merging hand and digital drawing techniques. The school also operates a 30-seat teaching lab with output devices used for course lectures, short workshops and to allow students access to design software that supports individual work and allows online collaborative projects between architects, landscape architects, interior designers, artists, engineers, mathematicians and fabricators.

The Materials Shop

The Materials Shop supports construction projects ranging from light fixtures and furniture to three-dimensional models. The facility is staffed by one full-time technician and is available to students and faculty for design, coursework, and research projects. The workshop houses multiple table saws, band-saws, chop saw, scroll saw, drill presses, jointer, planer, lathe, belt sanders, metal break and many hand tools.

The materials laboratory is a learning resource providing access to timeless, innovative, emerging, and sustainable materials and technologies that enables students to grow creatively and to become socially and environmentally responsible professionals. The tangible collection offers students the opportunity to engage a material’s composition, physical structure, function, and environmental impact while exploring diverse design applications and assemblies.  Searching materials is available through an online database organized by composition, manufacturing process, form, and application.

Garvan Woodland Gardens

Located on Lake Hamilton in Hot Springs, Arkansas, Garvan Woodland Gardens is an integral unit of the school. The land and endowment were the result of a bequest to the department of landscape architecture in 1985. This 210-acre woodland habitat features a variety of garden settings and unique architectural structures designed and developed by world-renowned specialists in botanical gardens, landscape architecture and architecture. An internship program offers opportunities for summer study and employment.

University of Arkansas Community Design Center

Since 1995 the University of Arkansas Community Design Center (UACDC) has provided award-winning, innovative planning to communities and organizations throughout Arkansas. A nationally recognized leader in urban design, sustainable development, and education UACDC design solutions advance triple-bottom line thinking: simultaneously solving for economic, ecological, and social criteria. The center’s work is multi-disciplinary as it addresses new challenges in affordable housing, context sensitive highway design, low impact development, transit-oriented development, big box urbanism, watershed urbanism, and agricultural urbanism. In the tradition of a teaching office, students collaborate with the center’s professional design staff and allied consultants while authoring their own proposals. The goal is to prepare designers for leadership in “wicked problem solving” that leads to intelligent development of the built environment.

Degrees Offered

The Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design offers five-year professional programs in architecture and landscape architecture and a four-year professional program in interior design. Each program culminates in a professional degree, the Bachelor of Architecture (B.Arch.), Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (B.L.A.) or Bachelor of Interior Design (B.I.D).

The Bachelor of Architecture prepares students for registration and licensure to practice architecture.  Architects are licensed professionals trained in the art and science of the design and construction of buildings and structures that primarily provide shelter. Additionally, architects may be involved with designing the total built environment—from how a building integrates with its surrounding landscape to architectural or construction details that involve the interior of the building to designing and creating furniture to be used in a specific space.  An architect will create the overall aesthetic and look of buildings and structures, but the design of a building involves far more than its appearance.  Buildings also must be functional, safe and economical and must suit the specific needs of the people who use them.  Most importantly, they must be built with the public's health, safety and welfare in mind.

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture prepares student practice landscape architecture as a licensed professional. The discipline of landscape architecture balances human requirements with landscape concerns. Landscape architects design, plan, and manage the land through understanding the interrelationships among the spirit of place, local ecology, individuals, and communities. They create outdoor spaces and rebuild ecological systems that meet societal needs, protect or enhance the natural environment, and respond to cultural conditions. Design and planning projects span the breadth of the profession to include urban design and town planning, public parks, land conservation, stormwater management systems, ecological rehabilitation, historic landscape preservation, private gardens, housing developments, institutional and business campuses, and golf courses.

Interior Design elevates the human experience as it operates at the intersection of human aspirations and the constructed environment. Students rigorously investigate contemporary physical, socio-cultural, psychological, aesthetic and sensory forces to craft the complete spatial experience. Interior Design at the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design educates and prepares its students for a rewarding and successful career in the profession. Students develop strong design and technical skills through experimentation, discovery and invention. Study abroad opportunities; transdisciplinary collaboration; and minors in sustainability and business enrich students' creative expression, deepens knowledge bases and builds critical thinking skills. The program requires practice-based internships and builds connections between students and potential employers. Graduates leave the school prepared to succeed as design professionals in growing global markets.

The Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies and the Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architectural Studies serve students who are interested in the design disciplines, but not professional practice. The four-year programs are well suited for students who seek careers in allied design disciplines, including historic preservation, environmental law, and history of architecture, as well as for students looking forward to graduate education in architecture, landscape architecture and the allied disciplines.

Minors

Students in architecture, landscape architecture and interior design may pursue academic minors in approved degree programs of other colleges on campus, providing they meet the specific requirements for that minor, as well as any of the school’s minors in History of Architecture and Design, Planting Design and Planning. An Interior Design minor is available only to students in the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design.

Accreditations

The architecture program was founded in 1946 and has been accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) since 1958. The landscape architecture program was established in 1975 and has been accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) since 1983. The Interior Design program was established in 1974 and has been accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) since 1993. The school holds memberships in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA) and the Interior Design Educators Council (IDEC), organizations that comprise North American schools of architecture,  landscape architecture and interior design.

Architecture – National Architectural Accrediting Board

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a six-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Doctor of Architecture and Master of Architecture degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design's department of architecture offers the following NAAB-accredited degree program:

  • B.Arch. (159 undergraduate credits)

The last accreditation visit for the B.Arch. programs was conducted in February 2014; the date of the next visit will be announced in spring 2022.

The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) only accredits professional programs offering the Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study, and the Master of Architecture degrees. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to practice as architects. The curricular requirements for awarding these degrees must include three components — general studies, professional studies, and electives. Together these three components comprise a liberal education in architecture and ensure that graduates will be technically competent, critical thinkers who are capable of defining multiple career paths within a changing societal context.

No four-year degrees are accredited by NAAB, but the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies degree is excellent for those who want a foundation in the field of architecture as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment in fields related to architecture.

Landscape Architecture – Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board

The Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in Landscape Architecture. LAAB recognizes the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture, and Masters of Landscape Architecture. It accredits each program every six years, evaluating degree of conformance with established education standards.

Masters degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which, when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design's department of landscape architecture offers the following LAAB-accredited degree program:

  • B.Larc. (160 undergraduate credits)

The next accreditation visit for the B.Larc program is 2022.

Interior Design – Council for Interior Design Accreditation

The Bachelor of Interior Design (B.I.D.) degree is accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA). CIDA, an independent, nonprofit accrediting organization, is the sole agency authorized to accredit professional degree programs in interior design.  To ensure conformance with educational standards, programs must seek re-accreditation every six years. The program is the oldest accredited interior design program in the state of Arkansas.

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design's department of Interior Design offers the following CIDA-accredited degree program:

  • B.I.D. (121 undergraduate credits)

 The last accreditation visit for the Interior Design program was conducted in April 2012; the next site visit is spring 2018.

Off-Campus Study Requirement

Each student in the professional program in architecture,  landscape architecture and interior design is required to complete an approved off-campus study experience focusing upon complex urban relationships, and fostering cultural diversity. Approved programs in the Fay Jones School vary. They range from a semester in Rome to five- to ten-week programs in Europe or Latin America.

A special international programs fee supports the school’s international programs. These fees are assessed to all students participating in the professional (five-year) degrees in architecture, landscape architecture and interior design designated in the “Fees and Cost Estimates” section of this catalog. The international program and any travel fees offsets the costs of maintaining off-campus programs that are not a part of the school’s university-funded budget, as well as enhancing student-centered activities. Students are assessed the international fee each semester up until the semester they study abroad. At that time, they will be assessed for any remaining semesters plus any additional program costs not covered by the international study fees. The fee is assessed for each study abroad program and is not regulated by the catalog year of the students’ first enrollment in the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design. All travel fees are non-refundable under any circumstances including withdrawal from the respective professional programs. For further information, see notes on related program fees under “Fees and Cost Estimates” for the university.

School Academic Regulations

Plus/Minus Grading System

The Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design utilizes a plus/minus grading system that assigns numerical values to 12 different grades. These values are used for architecture, interior design and landscape architecture courses when grade-point averages are calculated. The 12-step grading system with assigned values is as follows:

Grade Value
A 4.00
A- 3.67
B+ 3.33
B 3.00
B- 2.67
C+ 2.33
C 2.00
C- 1.67
D+ 1.33
D 1.00
D- 0.67
F 0.00

School Scholarships

More than 90 awards and scholarships, including both merit and need-based scholarships, are available to students in the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design. Most are awarded annually on the basis of recommendations made by the scholarship committee of the school. Only work accomplished since entering the school will be considered in determining merit awards based on grade-point averages.

Applications for scholarships are available for prospective and currently enrolled students at scholarships.uark.edu.

Student Organizations

American Institute of Architecture Students

The American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS) is a national organization whose purpose is “to organize architecture students and combine their efforts to advance the science and art of architecture, to promote excellence in architectural education, training and practice, and to foster an appreciation of architecture and related disciplines among all persons.” All students in the school’s architecture program are eligible for membership.

American Society of Landscape Architects, Student Chapter

The purpose of the student chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects is to bring together the landscape architecture students to combine their interests and efforts, to extend their knowledge of the profession of landscape architecture, and to help advance the profession while preparing for a professional career. All students in the school’s landscape architecture program are eligible for membership.

 American Society of Interior Designers Student Chapter

The American Society of Interior Design Student Chapter (ASID) is dedicated to representing the entire profession and encouraging the highest possible standards for the practice of interior design. Their purpose is to encourage interaction with professionals in interior design and allied professions and to develop leadership qualities.  All students in the school's interior design program are eligible for membership.

National Organization of Minority Architects

The National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) mission is to champion diversity within the design professions by promoting the excellence, community engagement, and professional development of its members.

Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society

The Alpha Eta Chapter of Tau Sigma Delta is the only national collegiate honor society recognized in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, interior design and allied arts. All students in the school are eligible for membership.

Elections to membership are made by the existing membership, subject to approval by the faculty, from the top 20 percent of each class of fourth-year and fifth-year students maintaining a minimum 3.00 cumulative grade-point average. In addition, leadership, character, and promise of professional merit are considered in making selections.

Sigma Lambda Alpha

Sigma Lambda Alpha, founded and chartered by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA), is an international honor society that encourages, recognizes and rewards academic excellence in preparation for the profession of landscape architecture. Any landscape architecture junior or senior with an average of 3.2 or higher is eligible for membership.

Ownership of Work

All original work submitted for credit, including design studio projects, becomes the property of the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design. Students are required to maintain portfolios documenting all academic and design studio work. Digital copies (compact discs) of all work completed in a studio must be submitted to the studio year coordinator in order to receive a grade for the studio.

School Computer Policy

archlabs.uark.edu

All students enrolled in the school are required to purchase, for their first year, a personal computer matching or exceeding specifications issued by school. The specifications are the same for all departments. All students will need their computers in the fall semester of the first year. The specifications, which are updated annually, are available through the advising center or on the school's computer tip page.

Recommendations for educationally priced computers are available on the UA Computer Store website. Looking under the Fay Jones School.

A substantial amount of software may be required depending on specific course requirements, most of which is free for students to download at school's Technical Support page.

Other software is available educational discount prices through the UA Computer Store.

Office of the Dean of the School
Vol Walker Hall, Room 120
479-575-4945

Dean
Peter MacKeith

Associate Dean
Ethel Goodstein-Murphree

Advising Center
479-575-2399

World Wide Web: architecture.uark.edu

E-mail: fjsoa@uark.edu

School Admission Requirements

Each program within the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design has its own requirements for admission to their general and professional programs. The page below provides admission requirements for:

  • The Department of Architecture
  • The Department Interior Design
  • The Department of Landscape Architecture

Department of Architecture Admissions

The department of architecture maintains two distinct tracks of study for entering freshmen to accommodate all students interested in pursuing a degree in architecture. The two tracks of study are designed to foster learning and to build strong foundations for entering students with different skill levels and high school backgrounds. Students accepted to the University of Arkansas with the intention to participate in the B.Arch. or B.S. programs in the department of architecture will be classified as fall/spring studio students or summer/summer studio students and assigned to either the fall/spring studio track or summer/summer studio track based upon department admissions policies described below.

Fall/Spring Studio

Students must meet all of the following requirements:

  • 25 ACT or better
  • 3.5 GPA in high school
  • College preparatory curriculum to include physics and an upper level math (Pre-Calculus or higher)

Space in the studio is limited to 120 students with priority given to first year students who are admitted to the University of Arkansas and indicate architecture or architectural studies as their intended degree program by Nov. 15.

Students are reviewed at the end of the fall semester and may continue in the program if they meet the following criteria:

  • “C” or better in ARCH 1015, Architectural Design I
  • “C” or better in PHYS 1044, Physics for Architects I or an approved equivalent
  • “C” or better in ARCH 1212, Design Thinking I: Foundations in Technology
  • Present a 2.0 GPA

Students who do not meet those criteria will receive a letter and be advised accordingly.

Summer/Summer Studio

Summer studio students meet the University of Arkansas minimum requirements for admission but do not meet the above noted department criteria for the fall/spring studio. These students can enroll in ARCH 1015, Architectural Design I in the summer if they meet the following criteria:

  • “C” or better in PHYS 1044, Physics for Architects I or an approved equivalent
  • Present a 2.0 GPA

Students who do not meet these criteria will be delayed until they satisfy the admissions criteria for the Department of Architecture. Students will be reviewed at the end of the first summer session and will not be allowed to continue in the program if they do not meet the following criteria:

  • “C” or better in ARCH 1015, Architectural Design I
  • “C” or better in ARCH 1212, Design Thinking I: Foundations in Technology
  • Maintain a 2.0 GPA

Architecture Department Transfer Students

Transfer students who are admitted to the Fay Jones School of Architecture start the design studio sequence in the summer and must meet the following requirements:

  • Completion of an approved general physics course and an approved mathematics course.
  • To enter Design I in the summer, students must successfully pass Physics for Architects I (or another approved upper level physics course) with a minimum of C or better, complete an approved math course and present a 2.0 GPA overall.
  • Students admitted to the university with a completed two-year associate of arts or associate of science degree from an Arkansas state-supported two-year or four-year college or university, as stated in ACT 182, will have general education (core) requirements waived. All students must complete any lower division discipline specific courses required for the major, as well as all courses required to comply with the conditions of accreditation.

Lack of knowledge or misinterpretation of policies and/or regulations on the part of individual students will not be considered a valid reason for failure to fulfill requirements.

Transferring from Accredited Schools of Architecture: Students transferring from an accredited professional program in architecture must have their architecture courses reviewed for acceptance and for determination of studio placement by submitting materials for review. Please contact the school’s advising center for a specific list of required materials.

NOTE: All students must complete or receive transfer credit for either PHYS 1044 Physics for Architects I or PHYS 2013 and PHYS 2011L College Physics I, MATH 1213 Plane Trigonometry, MATH 2033 Mathematical Thought, MATH 2043 Survey of Calculus or MATH 2053 Finite Mathematics and all other first year university core curriculum courses prior to entry into ARCH 2016 Architectural Design III and its co-requisites in architectural structures and history.

Ultimate responsibility for completion of entrance requirements rests with each student. For questions concerning admissions, please contact the school’s advising center for additional information.

Admission to the Professional Program

The department of architecture offers students the opportunity to prepare for architectural practice or related endeavors. With this opportunity comes a responsibility for demonstrating a commitment to personal growth and success in the professional program.

Students are admitted to the first year of the architecture curriculum based on the above described by the university and the school. Every semester, students’ grades in all architecture courses, especially the design studio, are evaluated to assess their progress and performance.

Upon completion of the third year of the five-year architecture curriculum, including completion of the 35 semester-credit hour university’s state minimum (general education) core required, students will be evaluated for admission to the professional program. Admission to the Professional Degree Program in the Department of Architecture requires a minimum 2.00 grade-point average in the University Core and each of the sub-disciplines of Architecture: History/Theory, Technology and Design.

Students admitted to the professional program will continue in the established studio curriculum sequence and are to complete the final two years of design studio at the school. In addition to completing the design studio sequence, students are encouraged to take maximum advantage of the opportunities that professional and free electives provide for pre-professional development, cultivation of specialization in and related to the profession, and/or preparation for graduate education.

Interior Design Program Admissions

Students are admitted to the first year of the interior design curriculum based on criteria established by the university and by the program. They are evaluated each semester by grades in lecture courses and by grades for performance and progress in the design studio sequence.

Admission to the Professional Program for Interior Design

The interior design program offers prospective students the opportunity to prepare for professional practice or related endeavors. With this opportunity comes a responsibility for demonstrating a commitment to personal growth and success in the professional program.

At the completion of the first year of the interior design curriculum, students will be evaluated for admission into the professional program on the basis of academic performance in the university core and the required interior design and architecture curriculum.   Admission is based on available desks and requires a majority vote of a departmental admissions committee. Students admitted to the professional program will continue in the established studio curriculum sequence and are to complete the final three years of design studio at the school. Students with less than a cumulative 2.5 GPA in IDES  and ARCH courses will not be admitted to the professional program.  Students who are not admitted are encouraged to consider alternative programs in the school and the university.  

Students are encouraged to maximize opportunities that professional and free electives provide for pre-professional development, specialization in areas related to the profession, and/or preparation for graduate education.

Department of Landscape Architecture Admissions

All students (including freshmen, international, and transfer students) admitted to the University of Arkansas are eligible for participation in the landscape architecture program in the school. Space in the studio is limited with priority given to first year students who are admitted and indicate landscape architecture or landscape architectural studies on their admissions application by November 15th. Students who require developmental work because of low ACT or SAT scores or university-administered math placement examinations or who require courses to remove deficiencies may not register for courses carrying LARC departmental designations. Upon completion of required developmental work and maintaining a grade-point average of 2.00 or more on at least 12 credit hours, students may enroll in landscape architecture (LARC) courses.

Admission to the Professional Program in Landscape Architecture

The department of landscape architecture offers a professional education grounded in liberal arts studies, which prepares students for landscape architecture practice in the private, public, and not-for-profit sectors. Successful completion of the program requires commitment to personal growth and excellence.

Students are admitted to the first year of the landscape architecture program based upon the established criteria by the University of Arkansas. Academic and professional performance is evaluated by grades in the course work, design studios, and construction labs. After two years in the program, students submit a portfolio of work at the end of the spring semester for application to continue in the professional program. Applicants who have a grade-point average below a 2.5 will not be allowed to continue in the program. Contact the department head for specific portfolio submission requirements and schedule of deadlines. All candidates will be notified of their acceptance or rejection in writing, normally by the first of August.

Students will be evaluated on general academic performance and in the landscape architecture curriculum as well as professional conduct. All department faculty serve on the admissions committee. Any appeal to the committee’s decision may be made by submitting a letter to the department head one week before the first week of the subsequent fall semester. The appeal will be presented to the entire faculty for consideration and will require the candidate to present their case in person.

Students who fail to gain admission to the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree program will be referred to the department head and the school’s academic adviser for appeal procedures and alternative degree programs in the school and the university.

Honors

Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design Honors Program

The Honors Program of the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design is proud to be one of the six individual honors programs partnered with the University of Arkansas Honors College. The Fay Jones School Honors Program is rooted in the best traditions of design education: responsibility and service to the societies and cultures to which we are inextricably connected, and the nurturing of the individual curiosity and capabilities of our students. Honors requirements are the same in all departments (Architecture, Interior Design and Landscape Architecture) and can be found below.

The Fay Jones School of  Architecture and Design Honors Program provides opportunities for students of superior academic and creative ability to enhance and enrich their professional and liberal education. Students in the Architecture Honors Program are eligible to graduate cum laude, magna cum laude, and summa cum laude. All other students who attain a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher will be eligible to graduate with distinction, a classification separate from the cum laude awards.

The school's Honors Program requires 18 credits of honors coursework.

Admission to the Fay Jones School Honors Program

The Honors College will automatically enroll freshmen who are accepted as honors students before summer orientation in  the Fay Jones School Honors Program. At summer orientation, these honors students will fill out the Fay Jones School Honors Program enrollment form. 

Freshmen who were not admitted by the Honors College before orientation but who come to orientation with the qualifying 28 composite ACT score and 3.5 high school GPA will also fill out the Fay Jones School Honors Program Enrollment form at orientation. Students who do not present both 28 composite ACT and 3.5 high school GPA, but who subsequently earn and maintain a 3.5 GPA in their coursework at the U. of A., will be invited to enroll in the Fay Jones Honors Program as soon as they attain a 3.5 GPA, provided it is still possible for them to complete all of the Honors program requirements at the time of their enrollment.

From the second semester of the third year onward, the Fay Jones School Honors Scholars are required to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.33 to remain in the program.

Transfer students may be invited to join the Fay Jones School Honors Program if they maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher in courses completed at the University of Arkansas by the end of the first semester of their third year of study, and a 3.33 GPA thereafter.

Every semester, the school's advising center will apprise the Fay Jones School Honors Program Committee of students who have achieved this level of excellence and are eligible to join the Fay Jones School Honors Program. Invitations are extended to students by the end of the semester in which the candidacy is advanced.

Confirmation of Intent to Complete the Fay Jones School Honors Program

At the end of the first semester of the third year, students will sign a form, confirming their intention to complete the remaining requirements for their honors degree. Students found not to have successfully completed the honors core course(s) needed to satisfy their Honors degree requirements (i.e., sufficient credits in University Core and/or Professional Core Honors courses) will be dismissed from the honors program at this time.

Dismissal from the Fay Jones School Honors Program

The Fay Jones School Honors Program students who fail to maintain a 3.5 or 3.33 cumulative GPA, depending on their year level, will receive a one-semester probation period prior to dismissal from the program.

Honors Independent Study Policy

Honors students may take as many regular or honors independent study credits as they deem desirable, but only one three-credit honors independent study course may be substituted for an Honors Professional Elective course.  Furthermore, the substitution will be permitted only if all of the following conditions are satisfied:

  • That the honors independent study course not be taken concurrently with capstone credit studio.
  • That the honors independent study course not be taught by the student’s capstone director.
  • That honors independent study course be substituted for no more than three credits of a student’s required professional electives credits.

It is recommended that students considering this option seek special advising from their faculty mentor. As it is helpful for students to know what is expected of them, the work of the honors independent study (research paper, models, prototypes, etc.) should be determined, and agreed upon, by the professor and student before the student registers for the credits. The school's advising center will register a student for a Honors Special Projects course only upon request of a syllabus or prospectus for the independent study from the student.  

Honors Capstone

All honors students will pursue a capstone project during the final year of their undergraduate program. Honors students will invest three credit hours in the development of a capstone project that will articulate research topics identified in the FJAD 3153H Honors Methods of Design Inquiry course taken spring semester in a students' third year.  Additionally, honors students are required to enroll in three credit hours of upper-level elective course-work related to the topic of the honors capstone. Guidelines for topic selection and preparation of the honors thesis/research project are available from the  Honors Committee.

The honors capstone is a student-directed project supervised by a capstone director with expertise in the capstone topic. The capstone director, who must be a faculty member in the Fay Jones School chairs a capstone committee to be comprised of two other members, typically, a departmental faculty member and a non-departmental faculty member who brings additional fields of knowledge to the project. In rare cases when the capstone director, in consultation with the School's Honors Committee and the student, determines that a non-departmental faculty member with expertise appropriate to the capstone in question cannot be identified on campus, an extra-disciplinary member from within the Fay Jones School (e.g., faculty in architectural history, technology, or other allied field) may fill the position of the non-departmental member. Any such exceptions to the standard membership of a capstone committee should be infrequent.  The point of including non-departmental participation is to help ensure that a student’s research is understandable and valid to an informed community outside of the disciplines of architecture, interior design or landscape architecture. Additional faculty, both departmental or non-departmental, as well as non-academic experts, may participate in any honors capstone as non-committee members, if capstone director welcomes their involvement.

Students will complete and present a written prospectus for the Honors Capstone no later than the Friday before summer break in their third year of study. The prospectus will be a product of the FJAD 3153H Honors Methods in Design Inquiry course.

Students shall meet a schedule of interim requirements established by the capstone committee in consultation with the School's Honors Committee.

Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design Honors Program Committee

The chair of the Fay Jones School's Honors Program and faculty members representing the allied fields of studio design, history/theory and building technologies comprise the School's Honors Program Committee. The committee serves to:

  • Review courses for honors designation.
  • Participate as ambassadors for the Department and its Honors Program.
  • Participate in recruiting efforts of the Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design and the Honors College.
  • Review Honors Capstone Prospectuses (developed in the FJAD 3153H Honors Methods in Design Inquire course) in the fall semester of a student's fourth year of study.

The committee shall meet at least once each semester, and at the discretion of the dean, associate dean and the chair of the School's Honors Program.

Requirements for Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design Honors Program Scholars

Completion of 18 hours of honors designated courses, to include a minimum of:

Honors elective (any Honors course at the university)3
Honors Professional Core (any Honors professional core in the Fay Jones School)3
Honors Professional Electives or upper-level (3000+) university honors courses6
FJAD 3153HHonors Methods of Design Inquiry (Sp)3
FJAD 5143HHonors Capstone (Sp, Fa)3
Total Hours18