Ken McCown
Department Head
Vol Walker Hall
479-575-4907

Department of Landscape Architecture Website

The Department of Landscape Architecture offers two degrees, the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture and the Bachelor of Landscape Studies.  The department also participates in the administration of the planning and planting design minors on campus.  With sustainability administered through the Fay Jones School, these degrees and minors offer students a robust package to develop the tools and acumen necessary to have an impact on making sustainable and resilient places for people and the planet.

The Department of Landscape Architecture focuses on design and advocacy.  The faculty in our department believe in the power of design and want to help our students and stakeholders become effective advocates to make positive and lasting change as collaborators and leaders.

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture prepares students to practice landscape architecture as licensed professionals.  Landscape Architecture is the sustainability profession, with practitioners providing meaningful solutions to such pressing topics as, climate change and resilience, clean water and air, health wellness and aging, and habitat and loss of it due to cataclysmic events such as wildfire.  

The practice of landscape architecture ranges across the geographic spectrum from urban to suburban, rural and ecosystems.  Landscape architects appropriately use systems thinking in the planning and design of systems, and design thinking at many scales, including of course to make spaces and places people inhabit outside.  Planning and analysis projects for systems include habitat and conservation, watersheds, and infrastructure such as food and agriculture, energy, and transportation.  Design thinking enables landscape architects to create parks, plazas, greenways, community gardens, green alleyways, green roofs and walls, and innovative and natural stormwater treatment in urban sites and places.

Sustainable and resilient landscapes for residential areas are also a part of practice, ranging from high-density urban housing to rural landscapes.  Cultural landscapes and historic, designed sites are also in the domain of landscape architectural practice.  These represent an important body of work for practitioners.  From the broad list above, opportunities are legion to use planning, design and design thinking to make better places for all.

The  Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architectural Studies serves students who are interested in the design disciplines, but not professional practice. This four-year program suits students who seek careers in allied planning and design disciplines, including urban and regional planning, historic preservation, environmental law, and architectural history.  This degree is an excellent platform for students looking forward to graduate education in professions such as architecture, landscape architecture, geography, and urban and regional planning.

Landscape Architecture – Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board

The Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in Landscape Architecture. LAAB recognizes the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture, Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture, and Masters of Landscape Architecture. It accredits each program every six years, evaluating degree of conformance with established education standards.

The University of Arkansas Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design's department of landscape architecture offers the following LAAB-accredited degree program:

  • B.L.A. (142 undergraduate credits)

The next accreditation visit for the B.L.A.  program is 2022.

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Degree

Requirements for completion of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture include the state minimum core

As part of the state minimum core, the department recommends the following:35
Laboratory Science
Select two of the following natural sciences for a total of eight hours:
Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture)
and Principles of Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lab)
Plant Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1034 Lecture)
and Plant Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1034 Lab)
Physical Geology (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lecture)
and Physical Geology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lab)
Completion of the following Professional Core:
Design and Advocacy Components
LARC 1315Fundamental Design Skills5
LARC 1325Fundamental Design Methodology5
LARC 2335Landscape Architecture Design III: Engaging Site, Engaging Place5
LARC 2351Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Site, Engaging Place1
LARC 2345Landscape Architecture IV: Collaborating with Site5
LARC 2361Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Site1
LARC 3355Landscape Architecture Design V: International Urban Place5
LARC 2371Advocacy and Theory Module: International Urban Place1
LARC 3365Landscape Architecture Design VI: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture5
LARC 3381Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture1
LARC 3375Landscape Architecture Design VII: Collaborating with Communities5
LARC 3391Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Communities1
LARC 4385Landscape Architecture Design VIII: Capstone5
LARC 4311Advocacy and Theory Module: Capstone1
LARC 4395Landscape Architecture Design IX: Comprehensive5
LARC 4321Advocacy and Theory Module: Comprehensive1
Communications Components
LARC 2113Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications3
LARC 3123Advanced Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications3
Honors students may also substitute up to 6 hours of the following:
Honors Special Projects
Construction Components
LARC 2714Ecological Design and Construction: Terrain4
LARC 2914Sustainable Design and Construction: Plant Communities4
LARC 3724Ecological Design and Construction: Water and Drainage4
LARC 3734Sustainable Design and Construction: Material and Methods of Assembly4
LARC 3914Sustainable Design and Construction: Remediation and Plants on Structure4
History and Theory Components
ARCH 1212Design Thinking I: Foundations in Technology2
ARCH 1222Design Thinking II: Foundations in History2
LARC 3413History of Landscape Architecture I3
LARC 4033Landscape Architecture Theory3
LARC 4413History of Landscape Architecture II3
LARC 4123Urban Form Studies3
Practice Components
LARC 4811Landscape Architecture Interns1
LARC 5613Landscape Architectural Professional Practice3
Professional Electives9
Students may select courses from the Departments of Landscape Architecture, Interior Design and Architecture as well as courses in history, geography, horticulture, art, sociology, environmental studies, and business. These courses can be thematically selected to emphasize urban studies, ecological planning, construction management, and land development.
Free Electives3
Students are encouraged to take courses outside the Department to broaden their education.
Total Hours145
  1. Candidates seeking graduation shall achieve a minimum of 145 hours and a minimum of a "C-" in each course within the professional curriculum. The remaining balance of hours shall have a minimum of 2.00 cumulative grade point average. Students must maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative grade-point average to continue in the studio sequence. Any student receiving a "D+/-" or below in the professional core shall repeat the course. Any student with a second "D+/-" or below shall be considered for non-continuance in the program as determined by the department head and faculty. To continue in the professional program, the student must submit a portfolio after their second year for faculty review. Please see section "Admission to the Professional Program in Landscape Architecture."
  2. Students in landscape architecture are required to complete the department's summer study abroad program, after their second year.

NOTE: No more than four hours of physical education and/or R.O.T.C. may be counted toward a degree. Courses not acceptable toward degree credit include those of a remedial or orientation nature and whose content are considered to be measurably duplicated elsewhere in the school’s curriculum. University Perspectives (UNIV 1001) does not count towards degree credit.

By following the preceding curriculum, students will meet the state-mandated University Core requirements. They must also meet all other University Requirements for graduation. The department strongly recommends that transfer students present eight hours of laboratory science courses selected from botany, biology, geology, and physical science as part of the state minimum core.

Students admitted to the university with a completed two-year associate of arts or associate of science degree from an Arkansas state-supported two-year or four-year college or university will receive credit for general education (core) requirements in accordance with ACT 182. All students also must complete any lower division discipline specific courses required for the major as well as all courses required to comply with the conditions of accreditation.

Grade Appeals – Department of Landscape Architecture

Students in the Department of Landscape Architecture may appeal grades in the design studios as well as other professional courses in which it is believed that there are questions of fairness or equity in the application of the published grading policy of the faculty member. Appeals must be made in writing to the department head one week before the first week of the subsequent semester. The appeal will be presented to the entire Landscape Architecture faculty for consideration and may require the students to present their case in person. Outcomes of grade appeals may result in one of the following:

1. A recommendation to the faculty member regarding the grade appeal of the student.

2. A requirement for the student to repeat the design studio course and any co-requisite.

3. A recommendation for enrollment in the subsequent studio course, while advising the student of the need to achieve and maintain a cumulative 2.00 (in the studio sequence) for admission to the professional program.

Professional Licensure Degree Requirement

The School’s Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program is accredited by LAAB, which requires that specific criteria be met in a professional program. This five-year professional program gives its graduates the required prerequisite degree to qualify to take the licensing exam and prepares them for practice.

All fifty states require licensure for landscape architects. The primary purpose of this licensure is to “protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public.” Most states require that candidates possess an accredited degree in landscape architecture and complete a period of professional experience, working with a licensed landscape architect. Once these requirements are complete, candidates must pass a national, uniform exam, sometimes with additional sections unique to that state.

Landscape Architecture B.L.A.
Ten-Semester Degree Program

The professional program for a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture Degree must be completed in 10 semesters of coursework and is not eligible for the Eight-Semester Degree Completion Program. However, the following 10-semester sample plan shows how a first-year student could obtain a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture degree in five years if the student is admitted to the Landscape Architecture Design Studio and subsequently is admitted to the professional program.

First YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
LARC 1315 Fundamental Design Skills5    
Select one of the following:4    
BIOL 1613 Plant Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1034 Lecture)
& BIOL 1611L Plant Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1034 Lab)
     
BIOL 1543 Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture)
& BIOL 1541L Principles of Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lab)
     
MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103)3    
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013)3    
UNIV 1001 University Perspectives0    
ARCH 1212 Design Thinking I: Foundations in Technology2    
GEOS 1113 Physical Geology (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lecture)
& GEOS 1111L Physical Geology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = GEOL 1114 Lab)
  4  
LARC 1325 Fundamental Design Methodology  5  
SOCI 2013 General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)  3  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023)  3  
ARCH 1222 Design Thinking II: Foundations in History  2  
Year Total: 17 17  
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
LARC 2335 Landscape Architecture Design III: Engaging Site, Engaging Place5    
LARC 2714 Ecological Design and Construction: Terrain4    
LARC 2351 Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Site, Engaging Place1    
LARC 3413 History of Landscape Architecture I3    
LARC 2113 Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications3    
LARC 3724 Ecological Design and Construction: Water and Drainage  4  
LARC 2361 Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Site  1  
LARC 2345 Landscape Architecture IV: Collaborating with Site  5  
LARC 4413 History of Landscape Architecture II  3  
LARC 2914 Sustainable Design and Construction: Plant Communities  4  
LARC 3355 Landscape Architecture Design V: International Urban Place    5
LARC 4123 Urban Form Studies    3
LARC 2371 Advocacy and Theory Module: International Urban Place    1
LARC 4033 Landscape Architecture Theory    3
Year Total: 16 17 12
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
LARC 3365 Landscape Architecture Design VI: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture5    
LARC 3734 Sustainable Design and Construction: Material and Methods of Assembly4    
LARC 3381 Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture1    
LARC 3914 Sustainable Design and Construction: Remediation and Plants on Structure4    
LARC 3123 Advanced Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications3    
Professional Elective (FJAD 3153H for Honors Students)  3  
Social Science Core Requirement  6  
HIST 2003 History of the American People to 1877 (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2113)
or HIST 2013 History of the American People, 1877 to Present (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2123)
  3  
LARC 3375 Landscape Architecture Design VII: Collaborating with Communities  5  
LARC 3391 Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Communities  1  
LARC 4811 Landscape Architecture Interns    1
Year Total: 17 18 1
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpringSummer
LARC 4385 Landscape Architecture Design VIII: Capstone5    
LARC 5613 Landscape Architectural Professional Practice3    
LARC 4311 Advocacy and Theory Module: Capstone1    
Professional Elective3    
Free Elective 3    
LARC 4395 Landscape Architecture Design IX: Comprehensive  5  
Professional Elective (FJAD 3153H for Honors Students)  3  
LARC 4321 Advocacy and Theory Module: Comprehensive  1  
Humanities Core Requirement  3  
Fine Arts Core Requirement  3  
Year Total: 15 15  
 
Total Units in Sequence:   145

Minor in Planting Design (for Horticulture majors)

17 Hours Total Required

Required Courses
LARC 2113Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications3
LARC 2714Ecological Design and Construction: Terrain4
LARC 3914Sustainable Design and Construction: Remediation and Plants on Structure4
Electives
Select two of the following:6
Basic Course in the Arts: The American Landscape
Advanced Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications
Special Projects
History of Landscape Architecture I
Ecological Design and Construction: Water and Drainage
History of Landscape Architecture II
Professional Landscape Management
Practical Landscape Planning
Total Hours17

Requirements for Urban and Regional Planning Minor

A student who is interested in the Urban and Regional Planning minor should notify either the Departments of Landscape Architecture or Political Science and consult with their academic advisor.  The minor consists of 18 hours of required and elective courses and subdivided into three tiers: core courses, tier-one electives and tier-two electives.  The minor’s required and elective courses include:

Required Core Courses:
PLSC 4103Introduction to Urban Planning3
LARC 5493Environmental Land Use Planning3
Tier-One Electives6-12
Select 6-12 hours from the following:
LARC-approved design studio focused on planning (may only count once)
LARC Advocacy Module focused on planning
Anthropology of the City
Community Development
Special Topics
Environmental Sociology
Urban Geography
Urban Politics
Incremental Sprawl Repair
Special Studies
Urban Sociology
Tier-Two Electives (up to six hours of electives may come from the following options)0-6
Landscape Architecture Theory
Sustaining Earth
American Public Lands & Policy
Environmental Justice
Historic Landscape Preservation
Cultural Resource Management I
Landscape Archaeology
Ecosystems Assessment
Ecosystems Assessment Laboratory
Environmental Ethics
Principles of Environmental Economics
Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations
History of Urban Form
DELIVER: Transportation and Distribution Management
Total Hours18

Professional Licensure Degree Requirement

The School’s Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program is accredited by LAAB, which requires that specific criteria be met in a professional program. This five-year professional program gives its graduates the required prerequisite degree to qualify to take the licensing exam and prepares them for practice.

All fifty states require licensure for landscape architects. The primary purpose of this licensure is to “protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public.” Most states require that candidates possess an accredited degree in landscape architecture and complete a period of professional experience, working with a licensed landscape architect. Once these requirements are complete, candidates must pass a national, uniform exam, sometimes with additional sections unique to that state.

Faculty

Biehle, Scott, M.L.A. (University of Texas at Austin), B.A. (St. Olaf College), Clinical Assistant Professor, 2012.
Billig, Noah Scott, Ph.D. (Clemson University), M.Ur.P., M.L.A., B.A. (University of Minnesota), Associate Professor, 2011.
Díaz Montemayor, Gabriel, M.L.A. (Auburn University), B.Arch. (Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua), Assistant Professor, 2019.
Erdman, Kimball Douglas, M.L.A. (University of Oregon), B.L.A. (Utah State University), Associate Professor, 2009.
McCown, Ken, M.Arch. (University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign), Professor, 2019.
Smith, Carl Alan, Ph.D., M.A. (University of Sheffield), B.Sc. (University of Lancaster), Associate Professor, 2008.

Courses

LARC 1003. Basic Course in the Arts: The American Landscape. 3 Hours.

Mankind's changing attitudes toward urban and rural outdoor spaces and their aesthetic and cultural values. The origins of the environmental/conservation movement and the development of an American land ethic. Appreciation of the relationship of the natural and historic landscape to the arts and the aesthetic importance of open space. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

LARC 1003H. Honors Basic Course in the Arts: The American Landscape. 3 Hours.

Mankind's changing attitudes toward urban and rural outdoor spaces and their aesthetic and cultural values. The origins of the environmental/conservation movement and the development of an American land ethic. Appreciation of the relationship of the natural and historic landscape to the arts and the aesthetic importance of open space. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

LARC 1315. Fundamental Design Skills. 5 Hours.

Fundamental design skills; development of visual and verbal communication skills including observation skills, design technologies, analysis and representation in both 2-dimensions and 3-dimensions through analog and digital tools; creative and critical thinking skills. (Typically offered: Fall and Summer)

LARC 1325. Fundamental Design Methodology. 5 Hours.

Fundamental design skills; use of precedents for understanding principles of design and natural and formal ordering systems; design development using both iterative and alternative methods of exploration in 2-dimensions and 3-dimensions using analog and digital tools; continued development of visual and verbal communication skills. Prerequisite: LARC 1315. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer)

LARC 2113. Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications. 3 Hours.

Investigation and application of foundational, current and innovative techniques and technologies used in landscape architecture. Field work and other modes of inquiry and seeing are used to study sites. Processes and workflow are learned. Students learn inquiry through technologies, site context investigation, and how to communicate to stakeholders. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 2335. Landscape Architecture Design III: Engaging Site, Engaging Place. 5 Hours.

Fundamentals of site inventory, analysis, and assessment. Through measurement, observation, and documentation, students engage with the design of local and regional sites, synthesizing place- based inventorial understanding and experiential response. Students gain an appreciation for both quantifiable and qualitative measurement and observation as creative tools for design development. Corequisite: LARC 2351. Prerequisite: LARC 1325. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 2345. Landscape Architecture IV: Collaborating with Site. 5 Hours.

Students consider an increased complexity of landscape issues and multi-purpose design strategies within a local or regional context, while simultaneously responding to external programmatic requirements. Instructor-guided design projects reinforce the value of site exploration and enumeration. The design process is enriched through programmatic and service requirements, stakeholder collaboration, and reflection on design implication. Corequisite: LARC 2351. Prerequisite: LARC 2335. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 2345H. Honors Landscape Architecture IV: Collaborating with Site. 5 Hours.

Students consider an increased complexity of landscape issues and multi-purpose design strategies within a local or regional context, while simultaneously responding to external programmatic requirements. Instructor-guided design projects reinforce the value of site exploration and enumeration. The design process is enriched through programmatic and service requirements, stakeholder collaboration, and reflection on design implication. Corequisite: LARC 2351. Prerequisite: LARC 2335 and Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is equivalent to LARC 2345.

LARC 2351. Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Site, Engaging Place. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 2335. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 2361. Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Site. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 2345. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 2371. Advocacy and Theory Module: International Urban Place. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 3355. (Typically offered: Summer)

LARC 2714. Ecological Design and Construction: Terrain. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to fundamental principles of reading and understanding geomorphology, site systems, and site design. Design tools include grading techniques, earthwork computations, and site-related documentation of natural and built structures. Site-related principles of sustainability are introduced as a framework for solving contemporary site issues. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 2914. Sustainable Design and Construction: Plant Communities. 4 Hours.

Introduces plants as components of healthy ecosystems, to innovative and sustainable plants and planting strategies as design frameworks, and to planting as powerful design tool. Soils as building block of healthy designs, foundation identification of woody plants and plant taxonomy, and fundamental concepts of time--ephemerality, phenology, and phenomenology. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 303V. Special Projects. 1-6 Hour.

Design implementation, study, practicum, and preparation of working drawings. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

LARC 303VH. Honors Special Projects. 1-6 Hour.

Design implementation, study, practicum, and preparation of working drawings. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is equivalent to LARC 303V.

LARC 3123. Advanced Design Visualization, Inquiry and Communications. 3 Hours.

Students learn the applications of current communication techniques and technologies in landscape architecture to discover implications through inquiry. Field work and other modes of investigation and seeing are used around urbanization and large scale landscapes in design inquiry. Students learn how to communicate the implications of design to broad stakeholders. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 3355. Landscape Architecture Design V: International Urban Place. 5 Hours.

Investigation of social behavior as applied to program and design that serves human needs. Projects reflect increased scope, scale, and resolution with a detailed design component. Studio and lecture. Corequisite: LARC 2371. Prerequisite: LARC 2345. (Typically offered: Summer)

LARC 3365. Landscape Architecture Design VI: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture. 5 Hours.

Students engage in design projects working for and/or with a particular population, including forming partnerships with a variety of stakeholders. The studio emphasizes empathy and understanding of competing value systems. Students apply a new cultural understanding to design projects. Corequisite: LARC 3381. Prerequisite: LARC 3355. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 3375. Landscape Architecture Design VII: Collaborating with Communities. 5 Hours.

Investigation and application of an issues-based, service-learning, community design project, focusing on resiliency and forming partnerships with a variety of stakeholders. Students engage in design as a means for influencing and negotiating on behalf of a community partner. Corequisite: LARC 3391. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 3381. Advocacy and Theory Module: Engaging Communities; Understanding Culture. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 3365. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 3391. Advocacy and Theory Module: Collaborating with Communities. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 3375. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 3413. History of Landscape Architecture I. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the interaction between landscapes and human cultural development as reflected in the meaning, organization, and impact of design and planning at garden and community scales from the Neolithic period through the eighteen century. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 3413H. Honors History of Landscape Architecture I. 3 Hours.

Analysis of the interaction between landscapes and human cultural development as reflected in the meaning, organization, and impact of design and planning at garden and community scales from the Neolithic period through the eighteenth century. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to LARC 3413.

LARC 3724. Ecological Design and Construction: Water and Drainage. 4 Hours.

Introduces water-related issues as encountered and addressed by landscape architects. Students will understand, apply, and design infrastructure such as retention/detention ponds, bioswales, and constructed wetlands. Technical documentation methods as a means of conveying design intent are included. Prerequisite: LARC 2714. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 3724H. Honors Landscape Construction II. 4 Hours.

Introduction to landscape architectural materials and methods of construction and assembly. Emphasis on material properties and how those properties affect the materials use in the landscape and interactions with other materials. Introduction to dimensioning and layout systems and parking requirements with increased complexity of construction documents. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to LARC 3724.

LARC 3734. Sustainable Design and Construction: Material and Methods of Assembly. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to issues in material selection including properties, construction techniques, practical considerations in material use and subsequent implications and effects on the built environment. Material use and human experience are also explored. Technical documentation methods as a means of conveying design intent are included. Prerequisite: LARC 3724. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 3734H. Honors Landscape Architecture Construction III. 4 Hours.

(Structures) Introduction into the design and fabrication methods of structures in the landscape. Emphasis on statics in calculating sizes and selection of materials for free-standing and retaining walls, and wooden structures. Advanced technical drawing component and computer integration of drawing production. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 3724 and Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is equivalent to LARC 3734.

LARC 3914. Sustainable Design and Construction: Remediation and Plants on Structure. 4 Hours.

Introduces particular strategies and techniques of plant use in the built environment. Potential topics include green infrastructure, site, soil, and water remediation techniques, and structural considerations of planting on structure. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 3914H. Honors Planting Design I. 4 Hours.

Introduction to small scale projects involving use of plant materials in relation to other landscape elements, formulation of a vocabulary of plant materials and preparation of integrated planting plans and applicable specifications. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: HORT 3103 and Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to LARC 3914.

LARC 3933. Cultural Landscape Studies. 3 Hours.

The examination of landscape forms, and their historic and evolutionary development. Includes study of cultural, political, and site context influences. Prerequisite: LARC 3413. (Typically offered: Irregular)

LARC 402V. Special Studies. 1-6 Hour.

Individual or group study and practicum involving landscape design, planning and management, history and environmental analysis. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

LARC 402VH. Honors Special Studies. 1-6 Hour.

Individual or group study and practicum involving landscape design, planning and management, history and environmental analysis. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.
This course is equivalent to LARC 402V.

LARC 4033. Landscape Architecture Theory. 3 Hours.

Examination of historic and current theories in landscape architecture and planning to develop critical judgement. Seminar format includes readings and case studies in issues such as social and environmental justice. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 4413 or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Summer)

LARC 4033H. Honors Landscape Architecture Theory. 3 Hours.

Examination of historic and current theories in landscape architecture and planning to develop critical judgement. Seminar format includes readings and case studies in issues such as social and environmental justice. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 4413 or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to LARC 4033.

LARC 4123. Urban Form Studies. 3 Hours.

The examination of urban, village, and suburban form and its influencing forces. Includes study of cultural forces, technological developments, and physical shape, scale, and materials that define urban areas. Required field trip component of study abroad. Prerequisite: LARC 3413. (Typically offered: Summer)

LARC 4311. Advocacy and Theory Module: Capstone. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 4385. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 4321. Advocacy and Theory Module: Comprehensive. 1 Hour.

Students explore theories and history and their implementation to increase understanding of concurrent design studio topics. Students develop advocacy capacities through communication, collaboration and skills through workshops, readings, stakeholder engagement and discussions. Students form rationales for design and personal disposition, while gaining knowledge to advocate for the profession and discipline. Corequisite: LARC 4395. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 4385. Landscape Architecture Design VIII: Capstone. 5 Hours.

Topic based, service learning studio that blends faculty research interests with student initiative and the potential for collaboration. This studio builds on the broad foundation of previous coursework while developing a design specialization through which students can advocate for both the profession and the communities they serve. Corequisite: LARC 4311. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 4395. Landscape Architecture Design IX: Comprehensive. 5 Hours.

Summative studio that requires the student to demonstrate landscape architectural design competency through a multiscalar approach that utilizes various resolutions to address critical, multidimensional problems. Corequisite: LARC 4321. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 4413. History of Landscape Architecture II. 3 Hours.

Critical study and analysis of landscape architecture from nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the philosophies, design and planning theories, and social conditions that have influenced the form of gardens, parks, and cities. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 4413H. Honors History of Landscape Architecture II. 3 Hours.

Critical study and analysis of landscape architecture from nineteenth century to the present, with an emphasis on the philosophies, design and planning theories, and social conditions that have influenced the form of gardens, parks, and cities. Prerequisite: Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is equivalent to LARC 4413.

LARC 4523H. Landscape Architecture Honors Thesis. 3 Hours.

Development and production of an honors thesis proposal and thesis. Required for all landscape architecture honors students. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Irregular)

LARC 4714. Landscape Architecture Construction IV. 4 Hours.

(Systems) Introduction to systems of landscape architectural construction including stormwater management, lighting, irrigation, water features, and erosion control. Emphasis on an advanced grading and landform manipulation skills, and stormwater system design and calculations. Significant integration of computer generated drawings. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: LARC 2714. (Typically offered: Fall)

LARC 4753. Incremental Sprawl Repair. 3 Hours.

Exploration of the causes, manifestation and results of suburban sprawl on the built environment. Design and planning strategies linked to landscape, urbanism, policy, transportation, resource-conservation, ecology, and social structures are proposed. Emphasis is placed on combining traditional and cutting edge methods for repairing sprawled cities and regions. Prerequisite: 4th or 5th year student or instructor approval. (Typically offered: Irregular)

LARC 4753H. Honors Incremental Sprawl Repair. 3 Hours.

Exploration of the causes, manifestation and results of suburban sprawl on the built environment. Design and planning strategies linked to landscape, urbanism, policy, transportation, resource-conservation, ecology, and social structures are proposed. Emphasis is placed on combining traditional and cutting edge methods for repairing sprawled cities and regions. Prerequisite: 4th or 5th year student or instructor approval. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is equivalent to LARC 4753.

LARC 4811. Landscape Architecture Interns. 1 Hour.

Supervised work experience and observation of operations and management procedures in approved design, government, or non-profit organization. Exposure to a wide range of job tasks and project types. Students apply what they learn to their studies. Summative outcomes include reflection. Prerequisite: LARC 3375. (Typically offered: Summer)

LARC 4943. Perspectives on Historic Preservation. 3 Hours.

Introduction of history, theory, and praxis of preservation design, emphasizing development and implementation of preservation projects in the practices of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design. Central themes include: preservation as a form of design; principles, rationales, and ideologies associated with preservation practice; and sustainable strategies for preservation design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233 and ARCH 2243 or LARC 3413 and LARC 4413 or IDES 2883. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with IDES 4943, ARCH 4943.

LARC 4943H. Honors Perspectives on Historic Preservation. 3 Hours.

Introduction of history, theory, and praxis of preservation design, emphasizing development and implementation of preservation projects in the practices of architecture, landscape architecture and interior design. Central themes include: preservation as a form of design; principles, rationales, and ideologies associated with preservation practice; and sustainable strategies for preservation design. Prerequisite: ARCH 2233 and ARCH 2243 or LARC 3413 and LARC 4413 or IDES 2883. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with LARC 4943, IDES 4943, ARCH 4943.

LARC 5053. Historic Landscape Preservation. 3 Hours.

Survey of historic preservation as a profession and the emerging cultural landscape preservation movement. Introduction to preservation principles as described by the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines. Analysis of case studies will reinforce basic philosophies and introduce preservation approaches. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 4413. (Typically offered: Irregular)

LARC 5053H. Honors Historic Landscape Preservation. 3 Hours.

Survey of historic preservation as a profession and the emerging cultural landscape preservation movement. Introduction to preservation principles as described by the Secretary of the Interiors Standards and Guidelines. Analysis of case studies will reinforce basic philosophies and introduce preservation approaches. Prerequisite: LARC 3413 and LARC 4413 and Honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is equivalent to LARC 5053.

LARC 5493. Environmental Land Use Planning. 3 Hours.

Investigation of the relationship between development, stewardship and land use on the city and regional scales. Natural resource systems, public policies, regional economics, and social contexts are investigated as informers of environmental planning and design decisions. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor approval. (Typically offered: Spring)

LARC 5493H. Honors Environmental Land Use Planning. 3 Hours.

Investigation of the relationship between development, stewardship and land use on the city and regional scales. Natural resource systems, public policies, regional economics, and social contexts are investigated as informers of environmental planning and design decisions. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor approval. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is equivalent to LARC 5493.

LARC 5613. Landscape Architectural Professional Practice. 3 Hours.

Review of professional and disciplinary responsibilities and related aspects (including health, safety, and welfare issues) of private, public and non-profit landscape architectural practice. (Typically offered: Fall)