Anna Zajicek
Department Chair
211 Old Main
479-575-3205

Department of Sociology and Criminology Website

The Department of Sociology and Criminology offers a major leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree in criminology. The Criminology BA provides marketable skills and knowledge that relate to crime prevention, law enforcement, and the court system. The program in criminology is comprehensive, adding the skills in research, theory, and data analytics that prepare students beyond an understanding of criminal procedures or evidence. This major will educate students in the complexities of criminal behavior and familiarize them with the justice system processes and the causes, correlations and consequences of criminal behavior. The department offers robust undergraduate internship opportunities that help criminology students develop a better understanding of a prospective career and determine whether their interests match a chosen career path, while simultaneously gaining experience with professionals in the field.

The department also offers a major in sociology, double major in criminology and sociology, a minor in sociology and a fully online minor in criminal justice.

For requirements for an M.A. degree in sociology, with criminology concentration, see the Graduate School Catalog.

University and College Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts in Criminology: In addition to the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences Graduation Requirements (see under Degree Completion Program Policy), the following course requirements must be met. Bolded courses from the course list below may be applied to portions of the University/state minimum core requirements.

State Minimum Core35
Select one of the following:3-4
Survey of Calculus (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2203)
Finite Mathematics
Mathematical Reasoning in a Quantitative World
Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405)
Principles of Statistics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2103)
World language up to the Elementary II level (1013) or higher6
37 credit hours in criminology (CRIM) and sociology (SOCI) courses:37
Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice (ACTS Equivalency = CRJU 1023)
General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013)
Sociology of Criminal Law
Criminological Theory
Criminological Theory
Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
Social Data and Analysis Laboratory
Social Data and Analysis
Social Research
15 credit hours of criminology (CRIM) courses numbered 3000-level or higher not taken above, six credit hours of which must be sociology (SOCI) or cross-listed with both CRIM/SOCI.
Any UA-Fayetteville credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher2
Any credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher or any 2000-level credit hours that have a course prerequisite7
General Electives30
Total Hours120

For transfer students, a minimum of 18 hours of coursework in the major at the University of Arkansas is required.

Writing Requirement: To fulfill the Fulbright College writing requirement, each criminology major will submit, prior to graduation, a substantial research or analytical paper, with a grade of “A” or “B” from an upper-division criminology course (3000-, 4000-, or 5000-level) to their departmental adviser. Satisfactory completion of an honors project or a senior thesis may fulfill this requirement.

B.A. in Criminology
Eight-Semester Degree Plan

In addition to the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences Graduation Requirements (see under Degree Completion Program Policy), the following course requirements must be met.

State minimum core requirements may vary by individual, based on placement and previous credit granted. Once all core requirements are met, students may substitute with general electives in consultation with their academic advisor.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)13  
Satisfies General Education Outcome 2.1:1
MATH 1313 Quantitative Reasoning (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1113)
or MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103)
3  
or any MATH or STAT course numbered higher than MATH 1203
SOCI 2013 General Sociology (ACTS Equivalency = SOCI 1013) (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 3.3, 4.1, and 4.2)13  
World language at the Elementary I (1003) level or higher3  
State Minimum Core—U.S. History or Government (Satisfies General Education Outcome 4.2)13  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023) (Satisfies General Education Outcome 1.1)1  3
Select one course from the following:  3-4
MATH 2043 Survey of Calculus (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2203)
MATH 2053 Finite Mathematics
MATH 2183 Mathematical Reasoning in a Quantitative World
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405)
STAT 2303 Principles of Statistics (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2103)
World language at the Elementary II (1013) level or higher  3
State Minimum Core—Fine Arts (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.1)1  3
General Elective  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
State Minimum Core—Science with corequisite lab (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.4)14  
State Minimum Core—Social Sciences (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)13  
CRIM 2003 Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice (ACTS Equivalency = CRJU 1023)3  
General Elective5  
SOCI 3313 Social Research  3
CRIM 2043 Sociology of Criminal Law  3
State Minimum Core—Science with corequisite lab (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.4)1  4
State Minimum Core—Social Sciences (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.3)1  3
General Elective  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
SOCI 3303 Social Data and Analysis
& SOCI 3301L Social Data and Analysis Laboratory
4  
CRIM 3023 Criminological Theory
or SOCI 3023 Criminological Theory
3  
SOCI 3193 Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality (Satisfies General Education Outcome 4.2)13  
Any credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher or any 2000-level credit hours that have a course prerequisite3  
General Elective (Must complete a course that satisfies General Education Outcome 5.1)13  
CRIM, SOCI, or cross-listed CRIM/SOCI electives numbered 3000-level or higher  6
State Minimum Core—Humanities (Satisfies General Education Outcome 3.2)1  3
Any credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher or any 2000-level credit hours that have a course prerequisite  3
General Elective  3
Year Total: 16 15
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
CRIM, SOCI, or cross-listed CRIM/SOCI electives numbered 3000-level or higher6  
Fulbright College Writing Requirement (Satisfies General Education Outcomes 1.2 and 6.1) 1, 2
Any UA-Fayetteville credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher2  
Any credit hours numbered 3000-level or higher or any 2000-level credit hours that have a course prerequisite1  
General Elective6  
CRIM, SOCI, or cross-listed CRIM/SOCI electives numbered 3000-level or higher  3
General Elective  10
Year Total: 15 13
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120

Requirements for a Minor in Criminal Justice:  18 semester hours in criminal justice and sociology to include CRIM 2003, CRIM 3023, SOCI 3313, and at least nine hours of 3000-level classes or above (no more than 3 hours may be SOCI).  A student must notify the department of her or his intent to minor.

Requirements for Departmental Honors in Criminology: The Departmental Honors Program in Criminology is an upper-division course of study based on a topic in the area of criminology. To be eligible for criminology honors candidacy, students normally will have completed 28 semester hours and not more than 85 semester hours with a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.5. They must take 12 hours (which may include 6 hours of thesis) in Honors Studies. The honors project may be an intensive study of a topic in criminology or an empirical research investigation. The candidate is expected to pass an oral examination given by an Honors Council Committee. Projects of extraordinarily high quality may be designated High Honors by the Committee. Successful completion of the requirements will be recognized by the award of the distinction Criminology Scholar cum laude at graduation. Higher degree distinctions are recommended only in truly exceptional cases and are based upon the whole of the candidate’s program of honors studies.

Faculty

Adams, Douglas James, Ph.D., M.A. (University of Arizona), Associate Professor, 1995, 2002.
Allison, Kayla, Ph.D., (Indiana University-Bloomington), M.A. (University of Arkansas), B.A. (Indiana University-Bloomington), Assistant Professor, 2020.
Barnum, Anthony Justin, Ph.D. (Howard University), M.A. (University of Arkansas), B.A. (Hendrix College), Teaching Assistant Professor, 2016, 2018.
Bustamante, Juan Jose, Ph.D. (Michigan State University), M.S., B.A. (University of Texas Pan American), Associate Professor, 2012, 2018.
Drawve, Grant R., Ph.D. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), M.A., B.A. (Southern Illinois University), Associate Professor, 2016, 2021.
Engen, Mindy Sue, Ph.D., M.A. (Pennsylvania State University), B.S. (Georgia State University), Professor, 2005, 2017.
Engen, Rodney L., Ph.D. (University of Washington), M.S., B.S. (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee), Associate Professor, 2009.
Fitzpatrick, Kevin M., Ph.D. (State University of New York at Albany), M.A. (University of South Carolina at Columbia), B.A. (Susquehanna University), University Professor, Bernice Jones Chair in Community, 2005, 2014.
Glisch-Sánchez, David L., Ph.D. (University of Texas), Associate Professor, 2020.
Gruenewald, Jeffrey A., Ph.D. (Michigan State University), Associate Professor, 2019.
Harris, Casey Taggart, Ph.D., M.A. (Pennsylvania State University), B.S. (Texas A&M University), Associate Professor, 2011, 2017.
Hearne, Brittany Nicole, Ph.D., M.A., (Vanderbilt University), B.S. (Texas A&M), Assistant Professor, 2018.
Holyfield, Lori C., Ph.D. (University of Georgia), M.A., B.S.E. (University of Arkansas), Professor, 1995, 2012.
Jackson, Brandon, Ph.D. (Florida State University), B.A. (Southern Methodist University), Associate Professor, 2018.
Koski, Patricia, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. (Washington State University), Associate Professor, 1984, 1988.
Morimoto, Shauna, Ph.D., M.S. (University of Wisconsin-Madison), B.A. (University of Pittsburgh), Associate Professor, 2008, 2014.
Niño, Michael D., Ph.D. (University of North Texas), M.A., B.S. (West Texas A&M University), Assistant Professor, 2020.
Paez, Rocio Alejandra, Ph.D., M.A., B.A. (University of Arkansas at Little Rock), Visiting Assistant Professor, 2018.
Sabon, Lauren, Ph.D. (University of Tennessee-Knoxville), M.S/M.A. (Marshall University), B.S., B.A. (West Virginia University), Teaching Associate Professor, 2014, 2017.
Schwab, Bill, Ph.D., M.A. (The Ohio State University), M.A. (University of Akron), B.A. (Miami University), University Professor, 1976, 2011.
Shields, Christopher A., Ph.D., J.D., M.A., B.A. (University of Arkansas), Teaching Associate Professor, 2003, 2017.
Thomas, Shaun A., Ph.D., M.A. (Louisiana State University), B.A. (University of Akron), Associate Professor, 2015, 2017.
Worden, Steven K., Ph.D. (University of Texas at Austin), M.A., B.A. (Portland State University), Associate Professor, 1986.
Yang, Song, Ph.D., M.S. (University of Minnesota-Twin Cities), M.A. (Nankai University, China), B.A. (Branch College of Nankai, China), Professor, 2002, 2016.
Zajicek, Anna, Ph.D. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University), M.S., B.S. (University of Silesia, Poland), Professor, 1994, 2006.

Courses

CRIM 2003. Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice (ACTS Equivalency = CRJU 1023). 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of criminology and the criminal justice system, including theories and patterns of criminal behavior, how criminal justice data are collected, social research methods, historical foundations of the field, institutions, and types of crimes and offenders. Provides a foundation for further criminological and theoretical studies. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

CRIM 2003H. Honors Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field history, development, and theoretical underpinnings of criminology and the criminal justice system, including theories aspects such as law enforcement, the courts, and patterns of criminal behavior, how criminal justice data are collected, social research methods, historical foundations of the field, institutions, and types of crimes and offenders. Provides a foundation for further criminological and theoretical studies. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)
This course is equivalent to CRIM 2003.

CRIM 2023. Introduction to Criminology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the field of criminology, including theories and patterns of criminal behavior, how criminal justice data are collected, social research methods, historical foundations of the field, and types of crimes and offenders. Provides a foundation for further criminological and theoretical studies. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2043. Sociology of Criminal Law. 3 Hours.

Explores the history of criminal law in the United States, the construction of crime and punishment, and issues facing the contemporary legal system. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

CRIM 2513. Criminal Investigation. 3 Hours.

Survey of the theories, concepts, and legal conditions concerning the techniques used in the location, preservation and presentation of evidence. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

CRIM 3011. Special Topics. 1 Hour.

Designed to develop the tools to write effectively in the social sciences, including skills related to organizing manuscripts, writing problem statements, identifying and synthesizing research, and revising and editing. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013 or CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3011.

CRIM 3023. Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

Advanced survey of theories of crime causation. Examines broad sociological paradigms, as well as both individual and aggregate-level explanations of crime causation. Applies criminological theories to contemporary issues associated with crime and criminal justice. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013 and junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

CRIM 3023H. Honors Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

Advanced survey of theories of crime causation. Examines broad sociological paradigms, as well as both individual and aggregate-level explanations of crime causation. Applies criminological theories to contemporary issues associated with crime and criminal justice. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013 and junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to CRIM 3023.

CRIM 3043. The Police and Society. 3 Hours.

Overview of origins, theories, development, practice, and current issues in policing in contemporary society. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

CRIM 3053. Serial Crime. 3 Hours.

Historical development of criminal profiling in serial homicide, including sex crimes, stalking, and arson. Focuses on behavioral and criminological theory and a critical examination of different profiling methodologies. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3053.

CRIM 3063. Victimology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the scientific study of victimization. Examines conceptual boundaries of victimology research, covers theories, statistics and trends relevant to victimology, reviews the victim blaming and defending perspectives, explores practical applications of victimology, and the social, legal, and evaluates criminological issues that stem from concern over victims. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3063.

CRIM 3203. Corrections and Social Control. 3 Hours.

Overview of correctional systems and punishment. Focuses on theories of correctional philosophies, practices, and procedures, along with the historical development and modern practices of corrections, sentencing, facilities, and issues facing correctional populations. Examines principles and practices of treatment and rehabilitation. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3203.

CRIM 3413. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in regular courses. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CRIM 3413H. Honors Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Designed to cover specialized topics not usually presented in regular courses. Prerequisite: Honors standing and SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.
This course is equivalent to CRIM 3413.

CRIM 3443. Stratification and Crime. 3 Hours.

Examines how race, age, gender, social class, and geographic location impact criminal offending, victimization, and arrest. Subsequently, it explores how the criminal justice system stages of policing, sentencing, and incarceration further entrench or mitigate disparities across social strata group. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Spring)

CRIM 3453. Immigration and Crime. 3 Hours.

Provides a comprehensive foundation of the relationship between immigration, one of the most powerful forces that influences a nation's social fabric, and crime. Focuses not only on U.S. immigration but also crime in the global context. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3453.

CRIM 3503. Criminal Procedures. 3 Hours.

Critical examination of how individual rights and police procedures are balanced with focus on arrests, use of force, identification, and search and seizure. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Irregular)

CRIM 3513. Criminal Evidence. 3 Hours.

Examination of how evidence is collected, processed, and presented in court, with an emphasis on the competing interests of crime control and individual liberties. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Irregular)

CRIM 3723. Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

Sociological overview of disconcerting conduct, its definition, theoretical understandings and research. Specific topics may include: interpersonal violence, self-destructive disorders, controversial lifestyles, substance abuse, as well as the relationship between inequality and disturbing acts. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 3723.

CRIM 399VH. Honors Course. 1-6 Hour.

Undergraduate honors thesis hours designed to engage in advanced undergraduate research under the direction of a faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring) May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

CRIM 4003. Internship in Criminal Justice and Criminology. 3 Hours.

Supervised experience in municipal, county or state criminal justice agency, or any other agency which is approved by instructor. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CRIM 4013. SPECIAL TOPICS. 3 Hours.

Offerings vary; check for particular course topics offered. Designed to cover specialized topics in greater depth than regular survey courses provide. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

CRIM 4013H. Honors Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Offerings vary; check for particular course topics offered. Designed to cover specialized topics in greater depth than regular survey courses provide. Prerequisite: Junior and honors standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.
This course is equivalent to CRIM 4013.

CRIM 403V. Individual Study. 1-3 Hour.

In-depth individual or group study with a faculty member on advanced sociological readings and/or to participate in supervised research as an experience-based course. Faculty permission required in advance of enrollment. Prerequisite: Instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CRIM 4063. Organizations in Society. 3 Hours.

Review of literature on work and organizations, with focus on race, class, gender inequalities, and interactions between society and organizations; discussion of topics related to white collar crime and deviant behavior inside modern corporations. Prerequisite: SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4063.

CRIM 4143. Juvenile Justice. 3 Hours.

Examination of juvenile justice system and juvenile crime, including historical development of the system and treatment of juvenile delinquents along with legal, correctional, and treatment processes and philosophies. Emphasis on current issues facing delinquents, the system, and delinquency prevention in addition to trends in juvenile crime. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4143.

CRIM 4223. Criminal Violence. 3 Hours.

Explores definitions, patterns, explanations, and potential interventions of aggression and criminal violence. Discusses the temporal, spatial, and demographic patterns of violence in the United States. Assesses various explanations of violence and considers possible interventions. Examines the literature on the structural- and individual-level correlates of violent criminal offending. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003 and junior standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

CRIM 4233. Death Penalty. 3 Hours.

Examines problems and social issues related to the death penalty in the U.S., including the history of capital punishment, Supreme Court decisions, how various jurisdictions seek the death penalty, the comparative costs of incarceration and execution, miscarriages of justice, and how the criminal justice system responds to these issues. Prerequisite: CRIM 2003 or SOCI 2013. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4233.

CRIM 4303. Spatial Analyses for Social Data. 3 Hours.

Focuses on learning about spatial data and how to use spatial analyses to detect patterns and answer research questions related to crime occurrence. Emphasizes how results translate to practitioner efforts and policy. (Typically offered: Spring)

CRIM 4443. Terrorism and Homeland Security. 3 Hours.

Examines the evolution of modern terrorism and homeland security, focusing primarily on the dynamics of American terrorist movements (ideologies, motives, and tactics). Social, political, and criminal justice responses to terrorism are also considered. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4443.