Douglas A. Behrend
Chair of the Department
216 Memorial Hall
479-575-4256
http://psyc.uark.edu
psycapp@uark.edu

The Department of Psychological Science offers a major leading to a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. Psychologists are the scientists of human behavior and mental processes. They approach these areas from a variety of perspectives.

Clinical psychologists seek to identify the causes of abnormal behavior and to change these behaviors so their clients can live more satisfying and rewarding lives.  Cognitive psychologists are interested in how knowledge and behavior are acquired, retained, and retrieved.  Developmental psychologists study physical, cognitive, and social changes that occur throughout an individual's life.  Neuroscientists are concerned with the biological bases of behavior. Social psychologists investigate Social psychologists study our thoughts and feelings about ourselves and other people.  Each of these perspectives is represented by members of the faculty in the Fulbright College Department of Psychological Science.

The Department of Psychological Science is one of the largest and most productive departments in the university in many ways.  Our faculty members are active researchers who bring their scientific excitement and curiosity into the classroom.  In addition the faculty is deeply committed to providing individualized training to our students, which is accomplished through experience in a faculty member’s lab, or perhaps doing an honors project.  We are one of the largest undergraduate majors, and our graduates pursue graduate training in many areas, including counseling, psychology, business, law, and medicine.  Other graduates enter the workforce in diverse areas, including human and social services, business, banking, and non-profit organizations.

For requirements for advanced degrees in psychology, see the Graduate School Catalog.

Requirements for B.A. Degree with a Major in Psychology

Students must complete 120 degree credit hours to include the minimum University Core requirements, the Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences Graduation Requirements, and following course requirements for the major. Bolded courses from the list below may be applied to portions of the University Core requirements.

A minimum of 42 semester hours, including:

2003 Intermediate I of any World Language. 13-6
PHIL 2003Introduction to Philosophy (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)3
or PHIL 2103 Introduction to Ethics (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003) (Sp, Su, Fa)
Select one of the following. Must complete with a grade of "C" or better:3-4
Survey of Calculus (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2203) (Sp, Su, Fa)
Finite Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa)
Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405) (Sp, Su, Fa)
33 semester hours in psychology to include:
PSYC 2003General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)3
PSYC 2013Introduction to Statistics for Psychologists (Sp, Su, Fa)3
PSYC 3073Research Methods (Sp, Fa)3
Select two of the following:6
Social Psychology (Sp, Fa)
Abnormal Psychology (Sp, Fa)
Developmental Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 2103) (Sp, Fa)
Psychological Tests (Irregular)
Psychology of Personality (Irregular)
Select two of the following:6
Cognitive Psychology (Sp)
Psychology of Learning (Sp)
Perception (Irregular)
History and Systems of Psychology (Irregular)
Behavioral Neuroscience (Fa)
Comparative Psychology (Sp)
Select three hours from one of the following:3
Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)
Nine hours of electives and may be chosen from any psychology course in this catalog, with no more than a total of six hours in PSYC 206V, PSYC 207V, and PSYC 399VH combined.9
A grade of “C” or better is required in all psychology courses used to satisfy the 33 hours of psychology courses. In addition, a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average is required on all work completed in the Department of Psychology.
Total Hours42-46
1

This is usually accomplished through completion of a sequence of two language courses: 1013 and 2003.

Students who want to pursue graduate training in psychology are advised to begin preparations early in their undergraduate careers. Grade-point average, scores on the Graduate Record Examinations, effective communications skills, preparation in the natural sciences and mathematics, and research experience (e.g., honors project, directed readings, laboratory experience) are the major criteria considered by admissions committees. To gain this research experience students are strongly encouraged to take the advanced research course, PSYC 328V.

Students with applied, paraprofessional, or human-service interests who plan to enter the job market with a B.A. in psychology are strongly encouraged to take relevant courses in other areas of interest, including, but not limited to, anthropology, sociology, social work, human development and family studies, education, and business administration.

Students interested in business applications of psychology (e.g., marketing, management) are similarly encouraged to take related courses in the Sam M. Walton College of Business; minors are also available in several areas of business. For more information concerning psychology as a major or careers in psychology and related fields, please contact the Psychology Advising Coordinator, Memorial Hall, room 203.

Writing Requirement: Students majoring in psychology will satisfy the Fulbright College writing requirement by successful completion (a grade of at least a “C”) in either PSYC 328V or PSYC 4283, each of which requires a final research paper written in American Psychological Association style.

Psychology B.A.

Eight-Semester Degree Program

Students wishing to follow the eight-semester degree plan should see the Eight-Semester Degree Policy in the Academic Regulations chapter for university core requirements of the program. Courses in psychology groups A, B and Capstone courses are listed after the program plan.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013) (Sp, Su, Fa)3  
Select one of the following:3  
MATH 1203 College Algebra (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)
MATH 2043 Survey of Calculus (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2203) (Sp, Su, Fa)1
MATH 2053 Finite Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa)
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405) (Sp, Su, Fa)
Select one of the following:3  
PSYC 2003 General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)
University/State Core Social Science Course
1013 Elementary II World Language Course (or higher level depending on placement)3  
General Elective3  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023) (Sp, Su, Fa)  3
Select one of the following MATH (if still needed):  3-4
MATH 2043 Survey of Calculus (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2203) (Sp, Su, Fa)1
MATH 2053 Finite Mathematics (Sp, Su, Fa)
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405) (Sp, Su, Fa)
General Elective
PSYC 2013 Introduction to Statistics for Psychologists (Sp, Su, Fa)1  3
or PSYC 2003 (if not taken earlier)
Science University/State Core Lecture with Corequisite Lab requirement  4
2003 Intermediate I World Language Course (as needed)  3
Year Total: 15 16
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
PSYC Course from Group A1, 23  
Select one of the following:3  
PSYC 3073 Research Methods (Sp, Fa)1, 2
PSYC 2013 Introduction to Statistics for Psychologists (Sp, Su, Fa) ((if not taken earlier))1
PHIL 2003 Introduction to Philosophy (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)
or PHIL 2103 Introduction to Ethics (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003) (Sp, Su, Fa)
3  
University/State Core Fine Arts or US History requirement3  
University/State Core Social Science requirement3  
Advanced Level Elective1  3
Select one of the following:  3
PSYC 3073 Research Methods (Sp, Fa)1, 2
University/State Core Social Science requirement
PSYC from Group A or B1, 2  3
University/State Core US History or Fine Arts requirement (as needed)  3
General Elective  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
PSYC Course from Group A or B (as needed)1, 23  
Select one of the following:3  
PSYC 328V Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)1, 2
PSYC 3000-4000-level Elective1, 2
Science University/State Core Lecture with Corequisite Lab requirement4  
General Electives6  
Select one of the following:  3
PSYC Course from Group A or B (as needed)1, 2
PSYC 3000-4000-Level Elective1, 2
PSYC 328V Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
& PSYC 4283 Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)1, 2
   
Advanced Level Elective1  3
General Electives  10
Year Total: 16 16
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
Select one of the following:3  
PSYC Course from Group A or B1, 2
PSYC 328V Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
& PSYC 4283 Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)1,2
   
PSYC Course from Group A or B (if needed)1, 23  
Advanced Level Elective13  
General Electives6  
Select one of the following:  3
PSYC 3000-4000 Level Elective1, 2
PSYC 328V Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
& PSYC 4283 Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)1, 2
   
Select one of the following:  3
PSYC 3000-4000 Level Elective1, 2
PSYC 328V Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
& PSYC 4283 Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)1, 2
   
3000-4000 Level Elective1  3
General Electives  3
Year Total: 15 12
 
Total Units in Sequence:  120
1

Meets 40-hour advanced credit hour requirement. See College Academic Regulations.

2

Meets 24-hour rule (24 hours of 3000-4000 level courses in Fulbright College), in addition to meeting the 40-hour rule. See College Academic Regulations.

Group A
Select two of the following:
Social Psychology (Sp, Fa)
Abnormal Psychology (Sp, Fa)
Developmental Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 2103) (Sp, Fa)
Psychology of Personality (Irregular)
Psychological Tests (Irregular)
Group B
Select two of the following:
Cognitive Psychology (Sp)
Psychology of Learning (Sp)
Perception (Irregular)
History and Systems of Psychology (Irregular)
Behavioral Neuroscience (Fa)
Comparative Psychology (Sp)
PSYC Capstone Courses
Three hours required with a grade of “C” or higher.
Advanced Research (Sp, Fa)
Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa)

Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

Minimum of 18 hours in psychology including:
PSYC 2003General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa)3
PSYC 2013Introduction to Statistics for Psychologists (Sp, Su, Fa)3
PSYC 3073Research Methods (Sp, Fa)3
A maximum of three hours of PSYC 206V and/or PSYC 207V can be counted toward meeting the minor requirement.
A grade of “C” or better is required in all psychology courses used to satisfy the 18 hours of the minor. In addition, a 2.00 cumulative grade-point average is required on all work completed in the Department of Psychology. Students must consult with, and obtain the signature of, the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the department in order to declare a minor.

Requirements for Graduation with Honors in Psychology: Both the College and the Departmental Honors Program in Psychology provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to formally participate in scholarly psychology activities. Honors candidates carry out independent study and research under the guidance of the Psychological Science faculty and participate in special honors classes, seminars, and colloquia. Admission to the Fulbright College Honors Program is open to psychology majors with a minimum, cumulative grade point average of 3.5 in all coursework.  Honors candidates must complete a minimum of 12 hours of honors courses, which may include up to 6 hours of thesis. In addition to satisfying the general college honors requirements, honors candidates in psychology are required to complete and orally defend an honors thesis based upon the independent study carried out in PSYC 399VH. To complete the required thesis successfully, students should choose an honors adviser as early as possible. An adviser should be selected, and an Honors Agreement completed, no later than the first semester in a student’s junior year. Students must register for, and complete, a minimum of 6 hours of PSYC 399VH. PSYC 399VH may be taken for 1 to 6 hours of credit each semester and repeated for a maximum of 12 hours. Nine hours are ordinarily needed to complete the research project and to prepare the honors thesis.

College honors candidates must meet the college's requirements for an honors degree.  Departmental honors candidates in psychology are encouraged to enroll in as many honors classes, seminars, and colloquia as possible, or as required by the honors program in which they are enrolled. Students graduating with honors typically graduate cum laude. Higher degree distinctions (magna cum laude, summa cum laude) are awarded by the Honors Council, recommended only in truly exceptional cases, and are based upon the whole of the candidate’s program of honors studies.

Psychology (B.A.) Teacher Licensure in Social Studies Requirements:

Please refer to the Secondary Education Requirements for Fulbright College Students.

Students wanting to teach social studies in middle school should consult with a middle level adviser in the College of Education and Health Professions.

Courses

PSYC 2003. General Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of Psychology, including the investigation of the biological bases of behavior; learning and cognitive processes; developmental and social psychology; and personality, psychopathology, and the treatment of psychological disorders. Students will be expected to complete a research requirement.

PSYC 2003H. Honors General Psychology (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to the field of Psychology, including the investigation of the biological bases of behavior; learning and cognitive processes; developmental and social psychology; and personality, psychopathology, and the treatment of psychological disorders. Students will be expected to complete a research requirement.

This course is equivalent to PSYC 2003.

PSYC 2013. Introduction to Statistics for Psychologists (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Introduction to the descriptive and inferential statistics commonly used by psychologists. A grade of C or better in PSYC 2013 is required as a prerequisite for PSYC 3073. Corequisite: Drill component. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 and MATH 2043 or MATH 2053 or MATH 2554, with a grade of C or better, and a Psychology major.

PSYC 206V. Directed Readings (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-4 Hour.

For undergraduate majors in psychology. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology; Instructor's permission. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

PSYC 207V. Laboratory Experience (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-4 Hour.

Laboratory experience in psychology obtained by working as part of a faculty member's research team. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003 and Instructor's permission. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

PSYC 3013. Social Psychology (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research in social psychology, emphasizing the influence of the social world on human behavior. Introduction to the problems, theories, and experiments of social psychology. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003.

PSYC 3023. Abnormal Psychology (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research about the causes and treatment of the major forms of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003.

PSYC 3073. Research Methods (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Training in execution and interpretation of experiments using the classical experimental designs. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: PSYC 2013 and (MATH 2043, or MATH 2053, or MATH 2554) with a grade of "C" or better and a psychology major.

PSYC 3093. Developmental Psychology (ACTS Equivalency = PSYC 2103) (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research in the psychological factors influencing development, including both hereditary and environmental influences, from conception through adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003.

PSYC 3103. Cognitive Psychology (Sp). 3 Hours.

Introduction to theories and research in cognition including memory, language, and problem-solving. Prerequisite: PSYC 2003.

PSYC 328V. Advanced Research (Sp, Fa). 1-3 Hour.

A lecture/laboratory course covering research in a specialized area of psychology. Provides experience with design, conduct, analysis, and presentation of research projects related to class topics. Successful completion of the class, including a formal paper in APA style, with a grade of C or better will fulfill the senior writing requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 3073 with a grade of C or better.

PSYC 3923H. Honors Colloquium (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Treats a special topic or issue, offered as part of the honors program. May be repeated when the content is changed. Prerequisite: honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in psychology). May be repeated for degree credit.

PSYC 399VH. Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Prerequisite: Junior standing and instructor's permission. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

PSYC 4033. Educational Psychology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Psychological theories and concepts applied to the educational process. Investigates the learner and instructional variables in a wide range of educational settings. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4053. Psychological Tests (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Nature and theory of individual and group tests of intelligence, personality, interests, and attitudes. Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology, including a C or better in PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4063. Psychology of Personality (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research concerning the development and nature of the normal personality. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4073. Psychology of Learning (Sp). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research on basic principles of learning and memory in both animals and humans. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 409V. Psychology Seminar (Irregular). 1-3 Hour.

Provides intensive coverage of specialized psychological topics. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013. May be repeated for up to 18 hours of degree credit.

PSYC 4123. Perception (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Theories and representative research in the areas of sensation and perception. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4143. History and Systems of Psychology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examination of the concepts, methods, and systems which have contributed to the development of modern psychology. Prerequisite: Fifteen hours of psychology and senior standing.

PSYC 4183. Behavioral Neuroscience (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examination of the biological basis of behavior. Surveys the anatomy, physiology, and pharmacology of the mammalian brain and examines brain mechanisms underlying a wide range of behaviors and cognitive processes. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4193. Comparative Psychology (Sp). 3 Hours.

Analysis of animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective, with emphasis on the role of the environment and interactions with other animals in shaping the evolution of behavior within a species, and the evolution of differences in behavior between species. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology, not including PSYC 2013.

PSYC 4283. Advanced Seminar (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

A seminar/discussion class covering research in specialized areas of psychology. Students will read original sources and present their ideas and conclusions several formats. Successful completion of the class, including a formal paper in APA style, with a grade of C or better will fulfill the senior writing requirement. Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of psychology including a grade of at least a C in PSYC 3073; senior standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Nancy D. Alwood, Instructor
Douglas A. Behrend, Professor
Denise R. Beike, Professor
Ana Julia Bridges, Associate Professor
Timothy A. Cavell, Professor
Kate M. Chapman, Visiting Assistant Professor
Christopher Ditzfeld, Instructor
Alex R. Dopp, Assistant Professor
Scott H. Eidelman, Associate Professor
Matthew T. Feldner, Professor
Patrick Forscher, Assistant Professor
Lindsay S. Ham-Holm, Associate Professor
Jeremy Holm, Instructor
Connie Lamm, Assistant Professor
James Michael Lampinen, Distinguished Professor
Ellen Winifred Leen-Feldner, Professor
William H. Levine, Associate Professor
Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis, Professor
Nathan A. Parks, Assistant Professor
Patricia Ann Louise Petretic, Associate Professor
Joseph E. Steinmetz, Distinguished Professor of Psychological and Brain Science
Jennifer Celene Veilleux, Associate Professor
Brenda June Zies, Visiting Assistant Professor