Food Science (FDSC)

Jeyam Subbiah
Department Head
N-201 Food Science Building
479-575-4605
jsubbiah@uark.edu

Renee Threlfall
Brewing Science Certificate of Proficiency Program Director
B-3 Food Science Building
479-575-4677
rthrelf@uark.edu

Department of Food Science Website

Brewing Science Certificate of Proficiency Website

Food science is an interdisciplinary field involving microbiology, engineering, biochemistry, nutrition, and sensory science to better understand food processes and improve food products for the general public. As the stewards of the field, food scientists study the physical, microbial, and chemical makeup of food. They apply their findings to develop the safe, nutritious, and sustainable foods and innovative packaging that line supermarket shelves daily.

Food science prepares students for many interesting, rewarding and challenging professional career opportunities in industry, business, governmental and educational organizations associated with food and food-related products. Due to the diversity and abundance of opportunities available, students graduating with a B.S.A. in food science readily obtain employment in the food industry or continue studies for graduate school. Additionally, requirements for several pre-professional programs can be fulfilled while meeting requirements for the food science degree.

Students may choose one of three areas of concentration for their degree program: Food Science (FDSC), Food Technology (FDTN) or Food and Culinary Sciences (FDCU). The FDSC concentration at the University of Arkansas is one of only 43 programs in the United States and the only one in Arkansas that is approved by the Institute of Food Technologists. It provides students with a strong background in basic and applied sciences and food chemistry, microbiology, engineering and quality control.

The food we consume daily is the result of extensive food research, a systematic investigation into a variety of foods' properties and compositions. After the initial stages of research and development, food products are mass produced using the principles of food technology. The FDTN concentration provides students interested in food industry careers with a multidisciplinary education consisting of core food science requirements in combination with a minor chosen by the student to compliment the student's career goals.

Culinary sciences blend the artistic abilities of culinary arts with the scientific expertise of food science to shape the future of research and development in the food industry. The FDCU concentration provides students interested in product development careers with an interdisciplinary background in food science and culinary arts. This concentration is a partnership program with Northwest Arkansas Community College (NWACC). Students complete their culinary arts coursework at Brightwater: A Center for the Study of Food (an academic division of NWACC located in Bentonville, AR) and are eligible to receive a Certificate of Proficiency in Culinary Arts from NWACC with no additional coursework. Culinary coursework will be transferred to the UA; it can be taken prior to admission to the UA or taken while in residence at the UA. Food and Culinary Sciences concentration will provide students with the course work necessary to be eligible to become a Certified Culinary Scientist through the Research Chef’s Association.

Students in each concentration are required to complete a relevant internship. There are also ample opportunities for students to gain research and international experiences and to select a minor.

Courses

FDSC 10101. Exploring Topics in Food Science. 1 Hour.

Introduces the depth and scope of Food Science as a profession. This course emphasizes the importance of science in processing and preservation of food and discusses current topics and issues. Practical information on food processing, composition, additives, labeling, environmental issues, regulations, safety, sensory analysis, and health benefits will be provided. Curriculum offerings in Food Science will be related to job responsibilities as a Food Scientist. Lecture/discussions, 2 hours per week for 8 weeks. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 11003. Introduction to Food Science. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a general application and understanding of current issues associated with food products and food ingredients. Discussions will focus on controversial subjects involving food products, food additives, food safety and preservation techniques based on scientific principles and popular belief. Lecture/discussions/demonstrations, 3 hours per week. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

FDSC 22001. The Science of Chocolate. 1 Hour.

The objective of this course is to introduce you to the science and technology of chocolate production. You will learn the history, chemistry, and physics of chocolate. This course will provide you with an understanding of chocolate production steps, including cacao bean harvesting, fermentation, drying, roasting, grinding, and manufacturing, and how these unit operations affect chocolate texture and flavor. Special focus will be given to fat and sugar crystallization, sensory evaluation, and sustainability of chocolate production. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 220H1. Honors The Science of Chocolate. 1 Hour.

The objective of this course is to introduce you to the science and technology of chocolate production. You will learn the history, chemistry, and physics of chocolate. This course will provide you with an understanding of chocolate production steps, including cacao bean harvesting, fermentation, drying, roasting, grinding, and manufacturing, and how these unit operations affect chocolate texture and flavor. Special focus will be given to fat and sugar crystallization, sensory evaluation, and sustainability of chocolate production. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 24001. Uncorked: Vines to Wines. 1 Hour.

This introductory course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of growing grapes and winemaking, including history, grape growing, cultivars, chemistry, wine microorganisms, fermentation, winery operations, wine marketing, and the sensory and appreciation of wine. Coursework is expected to integrate lecture and guest presenters with supplement reading assignments. This course will not include wine tasting, therefore there are no age restrictions for enrollment. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 240H1. Honors Uncorked: Vines to Wines. 1 Hour.

This introductory course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of growing grapes and winemaking, including history, grape growing, cultivars, chemistry, wine microorganisms, fermentation, winery operations, wine marketing, and the sensory and appreciation of wine. Coursework is expected to integrate lecture and guest presenters with supplement reading assignments. This course will not include wine tasting, therefore there are no age restrictions for enrollment. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 25203. Sanitation and Safety in Food Processing Operations. 3 Hours.

Topics covered will provide an understanding of the control of microbial, chemical, and physical food hazards as well as emerging food safety issues. Course will include a discussion of sanitation, cleaners and sanitizers, sanitary equipment and facility designs, and microbial growth and control in food processing operations. Lecture/discussion. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 26003. The Science of Cooking. 3 Hours.

In recent years science has found its way into the kitchen and cooking into laboratories and food processing plants. This course is designed to integrate science and cooking to help students appreciate the chemical and physical properties of foods and understand how the processes used when handling, preparing, and storing foods affect these properties. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 27001. Food for Health. 1 Hour.

The course is designed for students interested in how foods affect one's health. This course provides students with a background of functional food that will enable them to understand, discuss, and evaluate functionality of food in relation to health. This class is designed to appeal to students studying food science, nutrition, biology, chemistry, nursing, and health and human performance. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 27401. Brewing Brilliance: Exploring the General Science of Fermented Beverages (Beer, Wine, and Spirits). 1 Hour.

This course is an introduction to the world of alcoholic beverages. Students will explore the general science, history, production, and cultural significance of beer, wine, spirits, and sake. Through presentations, readings, discussions, and tastings (of nonalcoholic products) students will gain a deeper appreciation for the complexity and diversity of these beverages. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 31003. Principles of Food Processing. 3 Hours.

The course is designed as an overview of the unit; food processing operations common to all types of food processing plants. Examples will be drawn from international food processing operations processing fruits and vegetables, poultry and meats, and oil seeds and cereal grains. Emphasis on oral communication and critical thinking skills. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 14203 and CHEM 14201 and (MATH 22003 or MATH 24004). (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 32002. Introduction to Food Law. 2 Hours.

Discussion of government laws and regulations affecting the manufacture of food. Emphasis is on federal regulations relating to food safety, labeling, and the FDA. Discussion relates to practical use of food law. Lecture 2 hours per week. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 320H2. Honors Introduction to Food Law. 2 Hours.

Discussion of government laws and regulations affecting the manufacture of food. Emphasis is on federal regulations relating to food safety, labeling, and the FDA. Discussion relates to practical use of food law. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 4000V. Special Problems. 1-4 Hour.

Investigation of assigned problems in food science. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

FDSC 41101. Food Analysis Lab. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises providing students with experience of analytical techniques and instrumentation used in food analysis. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: FDSC 41103. Prerequisite: FDSC 43004 and CHEM 14203 and CHEM 14201 and CHEM 26103 and CHEM 26101 or (CHEM 36053 and CHEM 36051). (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 41103. Food Analysis. 3 Hours.

Methods of analysis, instrumentation, and laboratory techniques for measuring the chemical composition of raw and value-added products. Lecture 3 hours. Corequisite: FDSC 41101. Prerequisite: FDSC 43004 and CHEM 14203 and CHEM 14201 and CHEM 26103 and CHEM 26101 or (CHEM 36053 and CHEM 36051). (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 41201. Food Microbiology Lab. 1 Hour.

A hands-on laboratory course designed to teach students microbiological techniques and certain enumeration and plating techniques of specific food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. Prerequisite: BIOL 20003 and BIOL 20001. Pre- or Corequisite: FDSC 41202. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 41202. Food Microbiology. 2 Hours.

The study of food microbiology including classification/ taxonomy, contamination, preservation and spoilage of different kinds of foods, pathogenic microorganisms, food poisoning, sanitation, control and inspection and beneficial uses of microorganisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 20003 and BIOL 20001 or BIOL 25473. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 43004. Food Chemistry. 4 Hours.

Water, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals in foods; biochemical and functional properties, enzymes, food additives (emulsifiers, pigments, colors, flavors, preservatives, and sweeteners) and texture as related to properties in food systems and during processing. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: CHEM 14203 and CHEM 14201 and CHEM 26103 and CHEM 26101 or (CHEM 36053 and CHEM 36051). (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 4310V. Internship in Food Science. 1-4 Hour.

The Food Science Internship is a supervised practical work experience with a food industry, research program or governmental agency to gain professional experience and insight into career opportunities. Prerequisite: Junior standing and consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

FDSC 44103. Sensory Evaluation of Food. 3 Hours.

Principles and procedures for sensory evaluation of food. Appropriate uses of specific tests are discussed, along with physiological, psychological, and environmental factors affecting sensory verdicts. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 21003 or BUSI 10303 or STAT 28233 or PSYC 20103. (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 45103. Cereal Processing Technology. 3 Hours.

Fundamental concepts of heat and mass transport in grains; cereal/grain structure, property and composition; cereal/grain processing systems and technology; cereal/grain co-product processing technology and value recovery; cereal/grain quality metrics, grading standards and food safety assurance. Prerequisite: FDSC 31003 or FDSC 47504 or with instructor permission. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

FDSC 45203. Brewing Science. 3 Hours.

The class is designed to give a thorough review of the biological and chemical processes involved in brewing beer and an appreciation for beer styles and flavors. Students will be introduced to industry professionals as well as employment opportunities that support the brewing industry from raw materials to packaged beer. Although not required, this course will be designed as a preparation course for students who may want to take an internationally recognized brewing exam/ certificate such as the General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing & Distilling (https://www.ibd.org.uk/ibd-qualifications/brewing-qualifications/general-certificate-in-brewing/ ). Prerequisite: (CHEM 14203 or CHEM 12103) and (BIOL 10103 or BIOL 10104). (Typically offered: Fall)

FDSC 47103. Product Innovation for the Food Scientist. 3 Hours.

This is a capstone course integrating knowledge developed in Food Science to the development of new food products. This course will take an integrated multidisciplinary approach to developing innovative food products and will provide learning experiences in new product development and Research & Development. Topics include product formulation, ingredient interactions, sensory analysis, packaging, labeling, food safety and food law. Corequisite: Lab component. Pre- or Corequisite: FDSC 41103 and FDSC 41101. Prerequisite: Senior standing, FDSC 43004, FDSC 31003, and FDSC 44103. (Typically offered: Spring)

FDSC 4720V. Special Topics in Food Science. 1-4 Hour.

Discussion focused on selected topics of particular fields of raw product physiology, food processing, chemistry, physiology, microbiology, evaluation, sensory analysis, and preservation. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

FDSC 47504. Engineering Principles of Food Processing. 4 Hours.

Basic mechanics of refrigeration, temperature controls, materials handling and mechanical problems as applied to foods and food processing. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MATH 12003, MATH 24004, PHYS 20103, PHYS 20101 and FDSC 31003. (Typically offered: Spring)