M.E. Betsy Garrison
Director
118 Home Economics Building
479-575-4305
http://hesc.uark.edu/

The School of Human Environmental Sciences at the University of Arkansas prepares students for a wide variety of professional careers in education, industry, business, government, and community services. The school is concerned with improving the quality of life for individuals and families as they exist and function in society. Human environmental sciences draw knowledge from research, from the physical, biological, and social sciences, and from arts and humanities. It relates this knowledge to an understanding of individuals’ and families’ needs and goals for food, clothing, shelter, management of resources, and human development and relationships. The School of Human Environmental Sciences has made a substantial contribution to the development of individuals and families through undergraduate and graduate preparation of human environmental scientists and through research in human nutrition, foods, human development, family sciences, apparel and textiles.

Four majors are offered in the School of Human Environmental Sciences:

The four majors of the B.S.H.E.S. degree have been accredited by the Council for Professional Development of the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences.

Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Courses

AMPD 1013. Introduction to Clothing Concepts (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Origin of dress, the evolution of fashion as an economic power, the sociological and psychological aspects of clothing in various cultures, aesthetics of dress, selection and consumption of clothing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC 1501 if HESC or AMPD major.

AMPD 1013H. Honors Introduction to Clothing Concepts (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Origin of dress, the evolution of fashion as an economic power, the sociological and psychological aspects of clothing in various cultures, aesthetics of dress, selection and consumption of clothing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing and HESC 1501 if HESC or AMPD major.

This course is equivalent to AMPD 1013.

AMPD 1023. Introduction to Apparel Production (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Course focuses on basic principles of apparel production and analysis of garment components of mass produced apparel. Students utilize computer generated designs in the production process. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC or AMPD students only.

AMPD 2013. Fashion, Buying and Promotion in a Global Market (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Fashion components, marketing theories and practices as they specifically relate to apparel, home goods, and other design driven products in the global market. Focus on principles and techniques on how fashion marketers develop and apply marketing strategies that meet consumer needs at a profit. International buying and promotional aspects of the apparel industry are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD major and AMPD 1013.

AMPD 2013H. Honors Fashion, Buying and Promotion in a Global Market (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Fashion components, marketing theories and practices as they specifically relate to apparel, home goods, and other design driven products in the global market. Focus on principles and techniques on how fashion marketers develop and apply marketing strategies that meet consumer needs at a profit. International buying and promotional aspects of the apparel industry are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD major, AMPD 1013 and honors standing.

This course is equivalent to AMPD 2013.

AMPD 2033. Computer Based Methods for Apparel (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students basic experience with CAD (computer aided design) apparel industry software in a computer laboratory environment. Prerequisite: AMPD majors only, AMPD 1013, AMPD 1023 and AGME 2903 or ISYS 1123 or equivalent.

AMPD 2053. Introduction to Textile Science (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Textile fibers and fabrics, their structure, properties, manufacture, wearing qualities and methods of laundering, finishing, and dyeing. Artistic and economic selection of materials for clothing and household furnishings. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC or AMPD students only.

AMPD 2063. Quality Assessment of Apparel (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Study of apparel from the perspective of structure, aesthetics, cost and expected performance of the finished product. Lecture 2 hours per week, lab 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 1023 and AMPD 2053.

AMPD 3003. Apparel Production (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

A study of product development and production through flat pattern manipulation and the related vocabulary necessary to communicate professionally within the industry. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: AMPD 2063.

AMPD 3033. Merchandising Math for the Apparel Industry (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Exploration of activities associated with the procurement of fashion apparel. A fashion analysis is directed toward apparel demands and the creation of a fashion statement by the use of specific quantitative skills. Course follows fashion item from the designer to the store. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or MATH 1204 or three credit hours of STAT and AMPD 2013.

AMPD 3043. Fashion Brand Management (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the fundamental elements of brand, the concept of brand equity, brand relationships with consumers, and the implications of technologies on the branding process in the fashion industry. The course topics include branding basics, the concept of brand equity, brand image, brand positioning, brand communications, the role of emotional and sensory experiences in fashion branding, luxury fashion brands, sustainable fashion branding management, and technology driven branding. Prerequisite: AMPD 2013.

AMPD 3071. Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Pre-Internship (Sp). 1 Hour.

A study of job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluations, job application, the resume, and portfolio development in preparation for AMPD 4082, AMPD Internship. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: AMPD majors only.

AMPD 4011. History of Apparel Through Film to 1900 (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

This course uses historic costume films to trace the evolution of clothing from ancient Egypt to the Twentieth Century. Emphasis is placed on societal aspects such as politics, religion, economy, technology, education, sports, class structure, and gender roles, and how they affect and change dress. Web-based course.

AMPD 4023. Merchandising Application for the Apparel Industry (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Application of merchandising theory, principles and practices in a capstone class. An in depth study of innovative apparel business concepts as applied to manufacturers and retailers of apparel including apparel classification, seasonal cycles, stock emphasis, assortment strategies, target customers, and apparel trends. Includes an overview of marketing communication including advertising, personal selling, and sales promotion. Prerequisite: AMPD 3033 and AMPD 3043.

AMPD 4033. Computer Aided Textile Design (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students advanced skills in textile design using industry based computer aided design (CAD) software. Lab 4 hours per week.Prerequisite: AMPD 2033 and AMPD 2053.

AMPD 4053. Historic and Contemporary Apparel (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course traces the evolution of clothing from ancient times to the twentieth century with emphasis upon Western civilization and includes the study of contemporary fashion as a social force including the origin, scope, theory, and history of the fashion business, the materials of fashion, the fashion producers, auxiliary fashion enterprises, designers, fashion leaders, and leading market. Cultural and economic factors affecting dress, adornment and customs associated dress will be stressed. The Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or instructor consent.

AMPD 4063. Advanced Apparel Production (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063 and AMPD 3003.

AMPD 4063H. Honors Advanced Apparel Production (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063 and AMPD 3003 and honors candidacy.

This course is equivalent to AMPD 4063.

AMPD 4082. Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Internship (Sp, Su, Fa). 2 Hours.

A practical experience in a retail store or in a work situation related to the apparel industry to gain insight into the field of apparel merchandising and operations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 2.50 cum GPA and AMPD 2013, AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063, AMPD 3003, AMPD 3033, AMPD 3043, AMPD 3071, COMM 1313 and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 4093. Apparel Merchandise Planning and Inventory Control (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Describes today's challenges for both apparel manufacturers and retailers in meeting the consumer's demands for the right products at the right prices - and at the right times. Follows the evolution of the merchandising function with emphasis on production efficiency, highlighting the philosophies of industry executives and the effective integration of the merchandising, store design, marketing, the apparel supply chain and manufacturing functions along the way. Prerequisite: AMPD 3033.

AMPD 4103. Evolution of Fashion and Society Through Television Media (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course uses television programming from its early beginnings in the 1930s through to the twenty-first century to trace major events, societal changes, and the associated evolution of fashion. The course examines television both as an innovator and diffuser of fashion trends.

AMPD 4111. History of Apparel Through Film from 1900 to Present (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

This course uses historic costume films to trace the evolution of clothing from 1900 to Present. Emphasis is placed on societal aspects such as politics, religion, economy, technology, education, sports, class structure, and gender roles, and how they affect and change dress. Web based course.

AMPD 4901. AMPD Pre-Study Tour (Sp, Su). 1 Hour.

A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for AMPD 491V AMPD Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. AMPD 4901 is content specific to each AMPD 491V study tour and must be repeated for each study tour destination. A grade of "C" or better is required to participate in AMPD 491V. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. AMPD majors with minimum 30 hours, or consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 4901H. Honors AMPD Pre-Study Tour (Sp, Su). 1 Hour.

A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for AMPD 491V AMPD Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. AMPD 4901 is content specific to each AMPD 491V study tour and must be repeated for each study tour destination. A grade of "C" or better is required to participate in AMPD 491V. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. AMPD majors with minimum 30 hours, or consent. May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

This course is equivalent to AMPD 4901.

AMPD 491V. AMPD Study Tour (Su). 2-6 Hour.

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 491VH. Honors AMPD Study Tour (Su). 2-6 Hour.

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

Hospitality Courses

HOSP 1301. Hospitality Pre-Internship (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

A study of job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluations, job application, the resume and portfolio development in preparation for HOSP 4693 Hospitality Management Internship. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and sophomore standing.

HOSP 1603. Introduction to Hospitality Management (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Study of the hospitality industry from a global perspective. Emphasizes an introduction to the different sectors of the hospitality industry: food service, lodging, travel & tourism, and marketing of the sectors. Exposes students to experienced practitioners who provide real life case studies and perspectives on management in the hospitality environment. Provides career development perspectives and instruction as well as management roles and techniques.

HOSP 2433. Catering of Events Management (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course focuses on catering in food service operations and management. Catering includes on-premise, off-premise. Emphasis is concentrated on the functions of catering to include planning, operations, organizing the event, equipment, implementing, controlling and legal issues. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and hospitality majors only.

HOSP 2603. Purchasing and Cost Control (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Food purchasing with emphasis on specifications. Relationship of food purchasing to available equipment. Receiving, storage, distribution, and inventory control. Meal quality control and costing. Food and nonfood materials, management of the purchasing process, and communication. Specification writing, menu analysis, and costing. Prerequisite: HESC or HNHI majors only.

HOSP 2633. Hotel and Resort Operations Management (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Detailed study of different departments within hotel properties. Emphasis on front office, food and beverage, housekeeping, engineering, security, sales and night audit reporting. Offers a complete approach to the operation of resort properties. Introduces students to the complex world of private club management, including club entertainment, recreation, and golf course management. Pre- or Corequisite: HOSP 1603.

HOSP 3601L. Menu, Layout & Food Prep Lab (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Observation and preparation of quantity food production and use of equipment will be covered in this lab. Corequisite: HOSP 3603. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, HOSP 2603 and FDSC 2503.

HOSP 3603. Menu, Layout & Food Preparation (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Preparation and service of food for large groups. Course includes recipe standardization, menu planning, cost control, sanitation, safety, and overall quality assurance. Instruction for planning food flow from receiving to service of meals, including choosing proper equipment for the flow plan and service items. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213 and HOSP 2603 and Junior standing.

HOSP 3633. Front Office Revenue Management (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course offers students the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to provide the front desk services of a lodging establishment. Emphasis is placed on the interrelated elements of front desk operations including financial statements such as balance sheets, profit and loss statements, nightly audit, guest portfolios, and additional hotel charges. This course will examine the front office/desk as a revenue center of a hotel in comparison to other revenue centers on property including: food and beverage, events, catering, gift shops, golf courses, spas, etc. Corequisite: HOSP 2633.

HOSP 3653. Food Systems Management (Fa). 3 Hours.

Organization and management of institutional and hospital food service with focus on functions of management, health codes, and professional development. Lecture 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: FDSC 2503.

HOSP 4633. Hospitality Operations and Financial Analysis (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

This course is an in-depth, comprehensive study of hospitality operations, with emphasis on financial statements and other accounting reports that are usually used by management staffs for strategic decision making. It includes the application of computer software and human resource management skills. Pre- or Corequisite: AGME 2903 or ISYS 1123 and HOSP 3633. Prerequisite: AGEC 2142 and AGEC 2141L or ACCT 2013.

HOSP 4643. Meetings, Events and Convention Management (Fa). 3 Hours.

Focuses on the planning and management of meetings and conventions in the hospitality industry. Includes catering in food service operations & management for on-premise and off-premise. Course content will also cover working with contract management operations and theme catering. Corequisite: AGEC 3303 or MKTG 3433 or HOSP 4673. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603.

HOSP 4653. Global Travel and Tourism Management (Sp). 3 Hours.

Course recounts the history of travel, explores the future, and discusses the components of tourism from a global perspective. An overview of tourism planning at the global level will be presented. A variety of planning theories, procedures and tourism guidelines to meet the diverse needs of travelers, destination communities, hospitality organizations, public, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector will be introduced in this class. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and PSYC 2003 or SOCI 2013.

HOSP 4663. Issues & Trends in Hospitality & Tourism (Sp). 3 Hours.

A study of world trends, issues, and the current state of the industry as well as predictions for the future of lodging, cruise, restaurant, technology, travel and tourism industries with applications to forecasting change in the hospitality and tourism industries. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603 and HOSP 2633. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HOSP 4673. Destination Marketing & Operations (Fa). 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the tasks and processes involved in running a successful destination management organization (DMO). The course places heavy emphasis on destination marketing. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and junior standing.

HOSP 4683. Food and Wine Management, Service and Evaluation (Fa). 3 Hours.

This course provides students with knowledge of the sensory relationship of wine and food and the important role this process has on gastronomic satisfaction and gastronomic tourism. Course topics will include developing and marketing the wine/food tourism product, wine and food pairing as a hierarchical process, gastronomic identity, Old and New World traditions, managing a food and wine program, trends in food and wine, and promoting Arkansas food and wine. Students must have Junior standing and be at least 21 years old. Students who may not imbibe for any reason should speak with the instructor about an accommodation and alternative assignments. Prerequisite: Junior standing and HOSP majors only and instructor consent required.

HOSP 4693. Hospitality Management Internship (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Supervised experience in an instructor approved work/learning situation relating to the hospitality industry in multiple aspects of a hospitality organization. Emphasis on application of knowledge and skills to actual job roles and responsibilities. Requires employment in a hospitality setting for a minimum of 250 clock hours that must be completed in the semester of enrollment. All internship contracts and enrollment forms must be submitted to the internship coordinator for course approval four weeks prior to the semester of enrollment. Prerequisite: HOSP 1301, Junior standing, restricted to HOSP students, 500 hours of documented work-related hospitality industry experience and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Human Environmental Sciences Courses

HESC 1403. Life Span Development (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

A broad overview of the physical, psychological, and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in a family context. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC 1403H. Honors Life Span Development (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

A broad overview of the physical, psychological, and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in a family context. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC 1501. Issues and Trends in Human Environmental Sciences (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

History of human environmental sciences and breadth of its professional opportunities. Prerequisite: AMPD, HESC, HOSP, NUTR, HDFS majors only or departmental consent.

HESC 2413. Family Relations (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Courtship, marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. Lecture 3 hours per week.

HESC 2413H. Honors Family Relations (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Courtship, marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. Lecture 3 hours per week.

This course is equivalent to HESC 2413.

HESC 255V. Special Topics (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in the specializations of human environmental sciences. May be repeated for degree credit.

HESC 2603. Rural Families and Communities (Sp). 3 Hours.

Meaning of sociology and sociological concepts with reference to rural society, families and communities; interdependence of rural and urban population in ecological areas; institutions; social change and adjustment.

HESC 2603H. Honors Rural Families and Communities (Sp). 3 Hours.

Meaning of sociology and sociological concepts with reference to rural society, families and communities; interdependence of rural and urban population in ecological areas; institutions; social change and adjustment. Prerequisite: Honors standing.

This course is equivalent to HESC 2603.

HESC 400V. Special Problems (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC 4233. Childhood Obesity: Context and Preventions (Su). 3 Hours.

A multidisciplinary course that focuses on the context and prevention of childhood obesity. Directed readings and discussion will center on an ecological approach: identifying the problem(s) and behavioral and environmental factors and their interactions, as well as predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors, and action plan(s). The issue is addressed from a multidisciplinary perspective, including economics, marketing, child development, nutrition, and health behavior.

HESC 4233H. Honors Childhood Obesity: Context and Preventions (Su). 3 Hours.

A multidisciplinary course that focuses on the context and prevention of childhood obesity. Directed readings and discussion will center on an ecological approach: identifying the problem(s) and behavioral and environmental factors and their interactions, as well as predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors, and action plan(s). The issue is addressed from a multidisciplinary perspective, including economics, marketing, child development, nutrition, and health behavior.

This course is equivalent to HESC 4233.

HESC 4423. Adult Development (Fa). 3 Hours.

Examine individual development beginning with the transition adulthood through middle age; approximate age ranges are 18-60 years. Content focuses on physical, cognitive, psychological, and social changes that occur throughout this period of the life span. The impact of love, work, and family on men's and women's movement through the transitions that comprise adulthood are emphasized. Prerequisite: HESC 1403 or PSYC 2003 and junior standing.

HESC 455V. Special Topics (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC 455VH. Honors Special Topics (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. Prerequisite: Honors standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Nutrition Courses

NUTR 1201. Introduction to the Dietetic Profession (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Introduction to profession of dietetics and nutrition including history, scope and future of professionals with emphasis on academic preparation, internships, acquisition of professional credentials, career laddering and career opportunities. Guest speakers will supplement lectures and assignments. Prerequisite: HESCBS or HNHIBS majors only or by department consent.

NUTR 1213. Fundamentals of Nutrition (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness.

NUTR 1213H. Honors Fundamentals of Nutrition (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness.

This course is equivalent to NUTR 1213.

NUTR 2111L. Principles of Foods Laboratory (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises and practice applicable of Principles of Foods. Lab 3 hours. Corequisite: NUTR 2112.

NUTR 2112. Principles of Foods (Sp, Fa). 2 Hours.

Physical and chemical characteristics of foods and factors that affect these characteristics during storage and preparation. Lecture 2 hours. Corequisite: NUTR 2111L. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213 and CHEM 1073 (or CHEM 1103 or CHEM 1213). FHNH or HNHI majors or minors or GHES or FCSE majors only.

NUTR 2203. Sports Nutrition (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

The integration of concepts from nutrition and exercise physiology into an applied multidisciplinary study of how food, beverages and dietary supplements influence physical performance. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213.

NUTR 3203. Human Nutrition (Sp). 3 Hours.

Fundamental human nutrition; nutritive value of foods and general functions of nutrients based on concepts derived from inorganic and organic chemistry. Examples relating nutrition to disease used as illustrations to deepen understanding of normal nutrition. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L or CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213.

NUTR 3213. Communication in Nutrition and Dietetics (Fa). 3 Hours.

A study of communication, nutrition education, health behavior theories, counseling and interviewing techniques, the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Code of Ethics, outcomes research, reimbursement and marketing yourself. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213 and FHNH or HNHI majors only.

NUTR 4103. Experimental Foods (Sp). 3 Hours.

Application of experimental methods for investigations in cookery. Group and individual problems. Lecture 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week. Pre- or Corequisite: AGST 4023 or STAT 2303 or EDFD 2403 or PSYC 2013 and FHNH or HNHI majors with senior standing only. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: NUTR 2112 and NUTR 2111L and (CHEM 1123 and CHEM 1121L or CHEM 1073 and CHEM 1071L).

NUTR 4213. Advanced Nutrition (Fa). 3 Hours.

Normal nutrition with emphasis on utilization of nutrients. Lecture and reports on current literature 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813 and NUTR 3203.

NUTR 4223. Life Cycle Nutrition (Fa). 3 Hours.

Study of normal nutrition emphasizing quantitative needs for nutrients as functions of biologic processes that vary during stages of the life cycle. Attention is given to preconception, pregnancy, childhood and older adults. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213 and either (BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L or ANSC 3032 and ANSC 3042) or (CHEM 1073 and CHEM 1071L or CHEM 1103 and BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L).

NUTR 4243. Community Nutrition (Sp). 3 Hours.

Identifying, assessing, and developing solutions for nutritional problems encountered at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213.

NUTR 4263. Medical Nutrition Therapy I (Fa). 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on the Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Pre- or corequisite: NUTR 4213 and NUTR 3213. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213 and BIOL 2211L (or ANSC 3042) and CHEM 3813.

NUTR 4273. Medical Nutrition Therapy II (Sp). 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on the Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 4263.

Laurie Marie McAlister Apple, Associate Professor
Julia Atiles, Instructor
Mechelle Bailey, Clinical Instructor
Mahendran Balasubramanian, Assistant Professor
Jennifer N. Becnel, Assistant Professor
Nancy Buckley, Instructor
Lance M. Cheramie, Instructor
Eunjoo Cho, Assistant Professor
Mardel Asbury Crandall, Instructor
Cynthia Elkins, Instructor
Serena M. Fuller, Associate Professor
Mary Elizabeth Garrison, Professor
Cora Hamm, Instructor
Lorna Harding, Instructor
Laura K. Herold, Clinical Assistant Professor
Laura Hill, Instructor
Stephanie K. Hubert, Instructor
Timothy Scott Killian, Associate Professor
Jae Kyeom Kim, Assistant Professor
Shelley McNally, Clinical Assistant Professor
Zola Moon, Clinical Associate Professor
Jacquelyn Dee Mosley, Associate Professor
Shari Coleman Moxley, Instructor
Catherine O'Brien, Instructor
Rana Post, Instructor
Lona Robertson, Professor
Lobat Siahmakoun, Instructor
Kathy Smith, Clinical Associate Professor
Cheryl Leigh Southward, Associate Professor
La Vona Traywick, Associate Professor
Sabrina P. Trudo, Associate Professor, Twenty First Century Endowed Chair in Human Environmental Sciences
Yao-Chin Wang, Assistant Professor
Lisa T. Washburn, Assistant Professor
Kelly Ann Way, Associate Professor
Amanda Williams, Assistant Professor