Donna L. Graham
Interim Director
118 Human Environmental Sciences Building
479-575-4305

School of Human Environmental Sciences Website

The School of Human Environmental Sciences at the University of Arkansas prepares students for a wide variety of professional careers in education, industry, business, government, and community services. The school is concerned with improving the quality of life for individuals and families as they exist and function in society. Human environmental sciences draws knowledge from research, from the physical, biological, and social sciences, and from arts and humanities. It relates this knowledge to an understanding of individuals’ and families’ needs and goals for food, clothing, shelter, management of resources, and human development and relationships. The School of Human Environmental Sciences has made a substantial contribution to the development of individuals and families through undergraduate and graduate preparation of human environmental scientists and through research in human nutrition, foods, human development, family sciences, apparel and textiles.

Six majors are offered in the School of Human Environmental Sciences:

Faculty

Apple, Laurie Marie McAlister, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University), M.S., B.S. (University of Arkansas), Associate Professor, 2000.
Bailey, Mechelle, M.S. (University of Tennessee), B.S. (University of Arkansas), Clinical Instructor, 2012.
Balasubramanian, Mahendran, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University), M.S. (Auburn University), B.Tech. (Anna University), Assistant Professor, 2017.
Becnel, Jennifer N., Ph.D. (Arizona State University), M.A. (University of California-San Francisco). B.A. (San Diego State University), Assistant Professor, 2014.
Blalock, Lydia, Ph.D., M.S. B.G.S (Louisiana State University), Instructor, 2016.
Buckley, Nancy, M.S., B.S. (University of Arkansas), Instructor, 2014.
Cheramie, Lance M., Ph.D., M.S. (University of Arkansas), B.S. (Nicholls State University), Instructor, 2002.
Cho, Eunjoo, Ph.D. (Iowa State University), M.S., B.S. (Hanyang University, Seoul), Associate Professor, 2013.
Duncan, James M., Ph.D. (Florida State University), M.S. (University of Arkansas), Instructor, 2017.
Fuller, Serena M., Ph.D. (University of California, Davis), Associate Professor, 2014.
Garrison, Mary Elizabeth, Ph.D., M.S. (Iowa State University), B.S. (Benedictine College), Professor, 2014.
Hamm, Cora, M.S. (New York University), Instructor, 2016.
Harding, Lorna, M.S. (University of Alberta, Canada), B.A. (University of Western Ontario, Canada), Instructor, 2004.
Herold, Laura K., Ph.D., M.A. (University of Michigan), B.A. (Oberlin College), Teaching Assistant Professor, 2015.
Hubert, Stephanie K., M.S. (University of Arkansas), B.S. (Kansas State University), Instructor, 2015.
Killian, Timothy Scott, Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Columbia), M.A. (Wheaton College), B.A. (Central Bible College), Associate Professor, 2001.
Ma, Weiyi, Ph.D, M.A. (University of Delaware), B.A. (China West Normal University), Assistant Professor, 2017.
Martinez, Dylan, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (University of Arkansas), Instructor, 2019.
McNally, Shelley Ann, Ph.D. (University of Toledo), M.S., B.S. (Ohio University), Professional Practice Assistant Professor, 2016.
Mosley, Jacquelyn Dee, Ph.D. (Texas Tech University), M.S. (Arizona State University), B.A. (University of Northern Iowa), Associate Professor, 2010.
Moxley, Shari Coleman, Ph.D. (University of North Carolina), Instructor, 2013.
O'Brien, Catherine, Ph.D. (University of Illinois, Chicago), M.P.H. (San Diego State University), M.A. (University of California, San Diego), B.S.Ed. (University of Wisconsin, Madison), Instructor, 2016.
Overby, Theresa, B.A. (University of Arkansas, Little Rock), Instructor, 2020.
Post, Rana, M.B.A. (William Woods University), B.S. (University of Missouri, Columbia), Instructor, 2008.
Powell, Rob, M.S., B.S. (Louisiana State University), Instructor, 2020.
Robertson, Lona, Ed.D. (Indiana University, Bloomington), M.S., B.S. (Florida State University), Professor, 2006.
Siahmakoun, Lobat, M.S. (University of Arkansas), B.S. (Missouri Southern State University), Instructor, 2015.
Smith, Kathy, Ed.D., M.S. (University of Arkansas), B.S. (The Ohio State University), Clinical Associate Professor, 1999.
Southward, Cheryl Leigh, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (University of Tennessee), Associate Professor, 2008.
Stallings, Melinda, M.A. (University of Houston–Clear Lake), B.S. (Louisiana State University), Instructor, 2019.
Trudo, Sabrina P., Ph.D. (University of Washington), B.S. (Brigham Young University), Associate Professor, 2015.
Wang, Yao-Chin, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University), M.B.A., B.Ec. (National Chung Cheng University), Assistant Professor, 2017.
Way, Kelly Ann, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (Oklahoma State University), Associate Professor, 2006.
Williams, Amanda, Ph.D., M.S., B.S. (Oklahoma State University), Assistant Professor, 2017.

Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Courses

AMPD 1013. Introduction to Clothing Concepts. 3 Hours.

Origin of dress, the evolution of fashion as an economic power, the sociological and psychological aspects of clothing in various cultures, aesthetics of dress, selection and consumption of clothing. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 1013H. Honors Introduction to Clothing Concepts. 3 Hours.

Origin of dress, the evolution of fashion as an economic power, the sociological and psychological aspects of clothing in various cultures, aesthetics of dress, selection and consumption of clothing. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to AMPD 1013.

AMPD 1023. Introduction to Apparel Production. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on basic principles of apparel production and analysis of garment components of mass produced apparel. Students utilize computer generated designs in the production process. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC or AMPD students only. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 2013. Fashion, Buying and Promotion in a Global Market. 3 Hours.

Fashion components, marketing theories and practices as they specifically relate to apparel, home goods, and other design driven products in the global market. Focus on principles and techniques on how fashion marketers develop and apply marketing strategies that meet consumer needs at a profit. International buying and promotional aspects of the apparel industry are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD major and AMPD 1013. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 2013H. Honors Fashion, Buying and Promotion in a Global Market. 3 Hours.

Fashion components, marketing theories and practices as they specifically relate to apparel, home goods, and other design driven products in the global market. Focus on principles and techniques on how fashion marketers develop and apply marketing strategies that meet consumer needs at a profit. International buying and promotional aspects of the apparel industry are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD major, AMPD 1013 and honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to AMPD 2013.

AMPD 2033. Computer Based Methods for Apparel. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students basic experience with CAD (computer aided design) apparel industry software in a computer laboratory environment. Prerequisite: AMPD majors only, AMPD 1013, AMPD 1023 and ASTM 2903 or ISYS 1123 or equivalent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 2053. Introduction to Textile Science. 3 Hours.

Textile fibers and fabrics, their structure, properties, manufacture, wearing qualities and methods of laundering, finishing, and dyeing. Artistic and economic selection of materials for clothing and household furnishings. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HESC, AMPD or FCSE students only. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 2063. Quality Assessment of Apparel. 3 Hours.

Study of apparel from the perspective of structure, aesthetics, cost and expected performance of the finished product. Lecture 2 hours per week, lab 2 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 1023 and AMPD 2053. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 3003. Apparel Production. 3 Hours.

A study of product development and production through flat pattern manipulation and the related vocabulary necessary to communicate professionally within the industry. Pre- or Corequisite: AMPD 2063. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 3033. Merchandising Math for the Apparel Industry. 3 Hours.

Exploration of activities associated with the procurement of fashion apparel. A fashion analysis is directed toward apparel demands and the creation of a fashion statement by the use of specific quantitative skills. Course follows fashion item from the designer to the store. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or MATH 1204 or three credit hours of STAT and AMPD 2013. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 3043. Fashion Brand Management. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on the fundamental elements of brand, the concept of brand equity, brand relationships with consumers, and the implications of technologies on the branding process in the fashion industry. The course topics include branding basics, the concept of brand equity, brand image, brand positioning, brand communications, the role of emotional and sensory experiences in fashion branding, luxury fashion brands, sustainable fashion branding management, and technology driven branding. Prerequisite: AMPD 2013. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 3071. Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Pre-Internship. 1 Hour.

A study of job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluations, job application, the resume, and portfolio development in preparation for AMPD 4083, AMPD Internship. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: AMPD majors only. (Typically offered: Spring)

AMPD 4011. History of Apparel Through Film to 1900. 1 Hour.

This course uses historic costume films to trace the evolution of clothing from ancient Egypt to the Twentieth Century. Emphasis is placed on societal aspects such as politics, religion, economy, technology, education, sports, class structure, and gender roles, and how they affect and change dress. Web-based course. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4023. Merchandising Application for the Apparel Industry. 3 Hours.

Application of merchandising theory, principles and practices in a capstone class. An in depth study of innovative apparel business concepts as applied to manufacturers and retailers of apparel including apparel classification, seasonal cycles, stock emphasis, assortment strategies, target customers, and apparel trends. Includes an overview of marketing communication including advertising, personal selling, and sales promotion. Prerequisite: AMPD 3033 and AMPD 3043 and senior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4033L. Computer Aided Textile Design. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to give students advanced skills in textile design using industry based computer aided design (CAD) software. Lab 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033, AMPD 2053 and senior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4053. Historic and Contemporary Apparel. 3 Hours.

This course traces the evolution of clothing from ancient times to the twentieth century with emphasis upon Western civilization and includes the study of contemporary fashion as a social force including the origin, scope, theory, and history of the fashion business, the materials of fashion, the fashion producers, auxiliary fashion enterprises, designers, fashion leaders, and leading market. Cultural and economic factors affecting dress, adornment and customs associated dress will be stressed. The Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Senior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4063. Advanced Apparel Production. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 2063 and AMPD 3003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4063H. Honors Advanced Apparel Production. 3 Hours.

An advanced study of product development incorporating technology used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising and/or product development in a computer laboratory environment. Laboratory 6 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063 and AMPD 3003 and honors candidacy. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to AMPD 4063.

AMPD 4083. Apparel Merchandising and Product Development Internship. 3 Hours.

A practical experience in a retail store or in a work situation related to the apparel industry to gain insight into the field of apparel merchandising and operations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 2.50 cum GPA and AMPD 2013, AMPD 2033, AMPD 2063, AMPD 3003, AMPD 3033, AMPD 3043, AMPD 3071, COMM 1313 and instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 4093. Apparel Merchandise Planning and Inventory Control. 3 Hours.

Describes today's challenges for both apparel manufacturers and retailers in meeting the consumer's demands for the right products at the right prices - and at the right times. Follows the evolution of the merchandising function with emphasis on production efficiency, highlighting the philosophies of industry executives and the effective integration of the merchandising, store design, marketing, the apparel supply chain and manufacturing functions along the way. Prerequisite: ECON 2143 and AMPD 3033 and senior standing or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4103. Evolution of Fashion and Society Through Television Media. 3 Hours.

This course uses television programming from its early beginnings in the 1930s through to the twenty-first century to trace major events, societal changes, and the associated evolution of fashion. The course examines television both as an innovator and diffuser of fashion trends. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4111. History of Apparel Through Film from 1900 to Present. 1 Hour.

This course uses historic costume films to trace the evolution of clothing from 1900 to Present. Emphasis is placed on societal aspects such as politics, religion, economy, technology, education, sports, class structure, and gender roles, and how they affect and change dress. Web based course. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

AMPD 4901. AMPD Pre-Study Tour. 1 Hour.

A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for AMPD 491V AMPD Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. AMPD 4901 is content specific to each AMPD 491V study tour and must be repeated for each study tour destination. A grade of "C" or better is required to participate in AMPD 491V. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. AMPD majors with minimum 30 hours, or consent. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 4901H. Honors AMPD Pre-Study Tour. 1 Hour.

A study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel studies in preparation for AMPD 491V AMPD Study Tour. The course examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. AMPD 4901 is content specific to each AMPD 491V study tour and must be repeated for each study tour destination. A grade of "C" or better is required to participate in AMPD 491V. Prerequisite: 2.0 minimum GPA. AMPD majors with minimum 30 hours, or consent. (Typically offered: Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 4 hours of degree credit.
This course is equivalent to AMPD 4901.

AMPD 491V. AMPD Study Tour. 2-6 Hour.

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. (Typically offered: Summer) May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

AMPD 491VH. Honors AMPD Study Tour. 2-6 Hour.

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. (Typically offered: Summer) May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.

Hospitality Courses

HOSP 1301. Hospitality Pre-Internship. 1 Hour.

A study of job descriptions, responsibilities at the management level, structural operations, work procedures, job performance evaluations, job application, the resume and portfolio development in preparation for HOSP 4693 Hospitality Management Internship. Lecture 1 hour per week. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP majors only, and sophomore standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 1603. Introduction to Hospitality Management. 3 Hours.

Study of the hospitality industry from a global perspective. Emphasizes an introduction to the different sectors of the hospitality industry: food service, lodging, travel & tourism, and marketing of the sectors. Exposes students to experienced practitioners who provide real life case studies and perspectives on management in the hospitality environment. Provides career development perspectives and instruction as well as management roles and techniques. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 2603. Purchasing and Cost Control. 3 Hours.

Food purchasing with emphasis on specifications. Relationship of food purchasing to available equipment. Receiving, storage, distribution, and inventory control. Meal quality control and costing. Food and nonfood materials, management of the purchasing process, and communication. Specification writing, menu analysis, and costing. Prerequisite: Must be a HESC, HNAD, FNAH or HOSP major or a EVMG-M student. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 2611. Foodservice Sanitation. 1 Hour.

Principles and theory of food safety and sanitation in the hospitality and foodservice industries, focused on prevention of food borne illnesses and ensuring public health and consumer safety. Prerequisite: HNAD, FNAH, or HOSP major, NUTR-M students or CATEBS-FCSE students. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 2633. Lodging Property Management. 3 Hours.

Examines the organization, duties and administration of the hotel. Includes: the rooms division, convention/meeting spaces, and general business operations. Pre- or Corequisite: HOSP 1603. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 2643. Intro to Casino Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of casino operations including the economics of the casino and its interface with hotels and other organizations and the practices and problems associated with the casino management such as staffing, security, controls, taxation and entertainment. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and (Hospitality Management Bachelor of Science (HOSPBS) or Hospitality Management Minor (HOSP-M) or Event Management Minor (EVMG-M) students). (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HOSP 2653. Introduction to Hospitality Finance. 3 Hours.

Accounting principles, procedures and transactions used for the compilation of financial reports in hospitality industries. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 3602L. Culture and Cuisines of the World Practicum. 2 Hours.

Development of service management skills for the hospitality industry through preparation and service of food, staffing, professionalism, recipe standardization, menu planning, cost control, sanitation, safety, and overall quality assurance. Instruction for planning food flow from receiving to service of meals, including choosing proper equipment for the flow plan and service items. Student must have a current Food Managers Certificate which is achieved upon successful completion of HOSP 2611. Laboratory 7 hrs per week. Pre- or Corequisite: HOSP 3603. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, HOSP 2603, HOSP 2611, Junior standing, Hospitality Management Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Science (HOSPBS) majors only, and instructor consent required. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 3603. Cultures and Cuisines of the World. 3 Hours.

Explores foods and food ways of various cultural/ethnic groups. Considers origin and migration of foods and customs throughout the world. Studies food's relationship to cultural groups, geographical location, social practices and economic well-being. Analyzes impact of multiple cultures on foods, food preparation, and food ways in the U.S. Students must have a current Food Managers Certification, which is achieved upon successful completion of HOSP 2611. Pre- or corequisite: HOSP 3602L. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603, HOSP 2611, junior standing, HOSP majors only and instructor consent required. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HOSP 3623. Introduction to Meetings and Events Management. 3 Hours.

Focuses on the planning and management of meetings and events in the hospitality industry. Includes developing event goals and objectives, site planning and management, event set up, risk management, food and beverage planning and management, budgeting, working with event services vendors, and marketing and promotion of events and meetings. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603, or Event Management Minor (EVMG-M) students. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 3653. Hospitality, Dietetic Management and Human Resources. 3 Hours.

Function and methods of management as related to the hospitality, nutrition and dietetic industries. Topics include: recruitment, placement, talent management, training and development, and compensation. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 or NUTR 1201, and junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Summer)

HOSP 3673. Event Safety and Venue Management. 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with the information, skills, and tools necessary to help provide a safe environment, reduce liability, and guide individual and group behavior at events. Students will learn how to develop a risk management and safety plan for an event and/or venue, how to identify and plan to avoid potential problems, and how to implement safety and crowd management plans to ensure a safe event. The primary focus of the course will be on live event and venue safety planning. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603, and HOSP 3623 or Event Management Minor (EVMG-M) students. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 4613. Festival Management and Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course provides students both knowledge and practical experiences of festival management and analysis. Lectures based on the selected textbook will systematically offer students the understanding of multiple aspects of a festival, such as alignment with the target attendees, connect to community and place, festival media platforms, and monitoring and evaluating festivals. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603, HOSP 3623, and EVMG-M students. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 4643. Special Events Management. 3 Hours.

Hands-on study of special events. Planning activities include conception, planning, implementation, execution of the hospitality program's annual fundraising event and evaluation. The interaction between staff, customers, guests, vendors, and others necessary to implement a successful special event. Topics including marketing, public relations and volunteer coordination are implemented. Additional focus on catering through, hotels, restaurants, and private companies. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603, HOSP 2603, HOSP 3623 and HOSP majors only. (Typically offered: Spring)

HOSP 4653. Global Travel and Tourism Management. 3 Hours.

Course recounts the history of travel, explores the future, and discusses the components of tourism from a global perspective. An overview of tourism planning at the global level will be presented. A variety of planning theories, procedures and tourism guidelines to meet the diverse needs of travelers, destination communities, hospitality organizations, public, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector will be introduced in this class. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and HOSP 3623, or Event Management Minor (EVMG-M) students. (Typically offered: Spring)

HOSP 4663. Hospitality Management Capstone. 3 Hours.

Integration of previous classroom, laboratory, and practical experiences through development of a comprehensive project. Additional focus on application of critical thinking, demonstration of leadership principles, interaction with industry professionals and development of an awareness of societal and ethical issues and their application to the hospitality industries. Prerequisite: HOSP 3603, HOSP 3602L, HOSP 3653 and Junior standing. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HOSP 4673. Destination Marketing & Operations. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the tasks and processes involved in running a successful destination management organization (DMO). The course places heavy emphasis on destination marketing. Prerequisite: HOSP 1603 and junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

HOSP 4693. Hospitality Management Internship. 3 Hours.

Supervised experience in an instructor approved work/learning situation relating to the hospitality industry in multiple aspects of a hospitality organization. Emphasis on application of knowledge and skills to actual job roles and responsibilities related to a future career in the hospitality industry. Requires employment in a hospitality setting for a minimum of 250 clock hours that must be completed in the semester of enrollment. Prerequisite: HOSP 1301, HOSP 2611, HOSP 2633, HOSP 2653, HOSP 3623, HOSP 3653, Junior standing, restricted to HOSP students, 500 hours of documented work-related hospitality industry experience and instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Human Development and Family Sciences Courses

HDFS 1403. Life Span Development. 3 Hours.

A broad overview of the physical, psychological, and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in a family context. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 1403H. Honors Life Span Development. 3 Hours.

A broad overview of the physical, psychological, and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in a family context. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 1423. Observation and Foundations for Teaching Young Children. 3 Hours.

Designed to acquaint students with the historical importance of early childhood education, the recognized standards for practice, the variety of program models, and career opportunities available. Emphasis will be placed on theories, evidence-based practice, ethics, diversity, and professional preparation for this knowledge-based, skill-driven field. Students will also obtain knowledge of state and federal laws pertaining to the care and education of young children. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 2401L. Infant and Toddler Development Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Introduction to infant and toddler development. Focus on observation and applied experience with children 0-3 documenting cognitive, emotional, language, physical, and social development, and demonstrating developmentally appropriate practice. Corequisite: HDFS 2403. Prerequisite: HDFS majors or BRKD majors or HDFS minors or CATEBS-FCSE majors or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2403. Infant and Toddler Development. 3 Hours.

Infant and toddler development from conception through toddlerhood with emphasis on physical, emotional, social, language, and cognitive domains. Theoretical and research-based information will be applied to developmentally appropriate practice. Historical and future perspectives will be explored as will the expanding opportunities for professional work with infants and toddlers. Observations in care centers will be assigned. Corequisite: HDFS 2401L. Prerequisite: HDFS majors or BRKD majors or HDFS minors or CATEBS-FCSE majors or by instructor consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2413. Family Relations. 3 Hours.

Courtship, marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2413H. Honors Family Relations. 3 Hours.

Courtship, marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 2413.

HDFS 2433. Child Development. 3 Hours.

Theory, research, and application in physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child, studied in the biocultural context. Begins with prenatal development and continues through adolescence, with special emphasis on early and middle childhood. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2433H. Honors Child Development. 3 Hours.

Theory, research, and application in physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child, studied in the biocultural context. Begins with prenatal development and continues through adolescence, with special emphasis on early and middle childhood. Prerequisite: Honors standing and HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 2433.

HDFS 2463. Administration and Leadership in the Helping Professions. 3 Hours.

Planning, developing, operating, and evaluating programs in the helping professions, including child care and family-related agencies. Emphasis will be on administrators' roles as leaders in organizations. Topics include facilities, budget, staff development, and policy manuals. Prerequisite: Human Environmental Science (HESCBS) majors, Human Development & Family Science (HDFSBS) majors, Birth through Kindergarten (BRKDBS) majors, Human Development & Family Science (HDFS-M) minors, or departmental consent. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 2471L. Child Guidance Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Introduction to the guidance system. Focus on discipline techniques that are positive and age/stage appropriate for children ages 3-8. Corequisite: HDFS 2473. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2473. Child Guidance. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the guidance system. Focus on discipline techniques that are positive and age/stage appropriate for children ages 3-8. Lecture 3 hours per week plus 1 hour demonstration. Corequisite: HDFS 2471L. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2483. Family Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Economic considerations of the family in a rapidly changing society. Family finance and consumer problems are emphasized. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2493. Introduction to Cultural Competence. 3 Hours.

Basic introduction to definitions of intercultural competence, diversity, cultural values and beliefs, attitudes and verbal and non-verbal behavior, are examined to identify basic differences among individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds and across populations. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HDFS 2603. Rural Families and Communities. 3 Hours.

Meaning of sociology and sociological concepts with reference to rural society, families and communities; interdependence of rural and urban population in ecological areas; institutions; social change and adjustment. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 2603H. Honors Rural Families and Communities. 3 Hours.

Meaning of sociology and sociological concepts with reference to rural society, families and communities; interdependence of rural and urban population in ecological areas; institutions; social change and adjustment. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Spring)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 2603.

HDFS 3333. Language and Literacy Pedagogy for Birth through Kindergarten Educators. 3 Hours.

This course combines theory on emergent language and literacy development with research-based pedagogy for birth through kindergarten classrooms. Topics include: language and literacy development and exceptionalities, English Language Learners, environmental influences, best practice pedagogy, identifying language and literacy delays, and intervention strategies. This course includes a service learning component. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433, HDFS 2403 and HDFS 2401L. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 3423. Adolescent Development. 3 Hours.

Physiological and psychological development of the older child and youth, from pre-adolescence to adulthood. Theories of adolescent development. Cross-cultural studies. Peer group influences. Some attention to pathological behaviors. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)

HDFS 3423H. Honors Adolescent Development. 3 Hours.

Physiological and psychological development of the older child and youth, from pre-adolescence to adulthood. Theories of adolescent development. Cross-cultural studies. Peer group influences. Some attention to pathological behaviors. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003 and honors standing. (Typically offered: Spring Odd Years)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 3423.

HDFS 3443. Families in Crisis. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary perspective on internal and external crises faced by contemporary families, including substance abuse, natural disasters and other crisis events. Students will explore the family processes during such experiences and develop strategies for stress management, coping, and recovery. Lecture 3 hours per week. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 3443H. Honors Families in Crisis. 3 Hours.

An interdisciplinary perspective on internal and external crises faced by contemporary families, including substance abuse, natural disasters and other crisis events. Students will explore the family processes during such experiences and develop strategies for stress management, coping, and recovery. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 3443.

HDFS 3453. Parenting and Family Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Focus is on influence of parenting and family dynamics on individual development, especially factors in family life which contribute to normal psychological development. Topics include family values, the psychology of sex and pregnancy, the transition to parenthood, childbearing techniques, family influences on cognitive and social development, and changes in family relationships during the life cycle. Prerequisite: (HDFS majors or HDFS minors or BRKD majors or CATEBS-FCSE majors) and (HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003) and COMM 1313. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

HDFS 3463. The Hospitalized Child: Child Life Programming. 3 Hours.

Introduces child life programming in health care settings. Topics include: roles and expectations of a Child Life Specialist, importance of play, coping techniques, family advocacy, administration and professionalism. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4313. Building Family and Community Relationships. 3 Hours.

This course will help students interested in early childhood to value the role parents play in schools and the role schools play in a community. Various models of parent involvement will be explored. Students will plan a school-community collaborative which values diverse cultures. Prerequisite: HDFS majors or HDFS minors, or instructor consent. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4332. Curriculum and Assessment: Birth to Three Years. 2 Hours.

The course will introduce students to curriculum planning and assessment in programs serving children from birth to three years of age. Emphasis will be on responsive relationships and curriculum focused on routines and activities. Corequisite: HDFS 4332L. Prerequisite: HDFS 2403 and HDFS 2401L. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4332L. Curriculum and Assessment: Birth to Three Years Laboratory. 2 Hours.

Laboratory. Corequisite: HDFS 4332. Prerequisite: HDFS 2403 and HDFS 2401L. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4342. Curriculum and Assessment: Three Years through Kindergarten. 2 Hours.

Students will plan curriculum and assessment for children three years of age through kindergarten. Emphasis will be on professionalism, philosophy and a code of ethics. Students will interact with young children and facilitate learning and assessment experiences in a program for young children. Corequisite: HDFS 4342L. Prerequisite: HDFS 2473 and HDFS 2471L. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4342L. Curriculum and Assessment: Three Years through Kindergarten. 2 Hours.

Laboratory. Corequisite: HDFS 4342. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4353. Play as Development in Childhood. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the contribution of play to cognitive, social, and emotional development of children. It will provide an overview of play theories and practices in indoor and outdoor settings, with an emphasis on nature-based learning and diversity and inclusion. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HDFS 4363. Play as Development in Adulthood. 3 Hours.

This course will examine play as it pertains to development throughout life with a particular focus on adulthood. The modes of adult play will be examined, along with the benefits of play across adulthood. Emphasis will be on play, not as opposition to work, but as a part of a full life. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HDFS 4373. Field Experience in Birth through Kindergarten Programs. 3 Hours.

This course provides the student with interactive and observational experiences with young children in community-based early childhood programs. Prerequisite: HDFS 4332, HDFS 4332L, HDFS 4342, and HDFS 4342L. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4383. Field Experience in Birth through Kindergarten Program II. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with advanced interactive and observational experiences with young children in community-based early childhood programs. Prerequisite: HDFS 4332 and HDFS 4332L and HDFS 4342 and HDFS 4342L. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4413. Infancy: Brain, Learning and Social Cognition. 3 Hours.

Investigation into how brain mechanisms interact with experience to provide the basis for learning and social cognition. Topics include face perception, motor cognition, imitation, joint attention and shared experience, empathy and altruism, theory of mind, social and moral cognition, language, memory, number, geometry and navigation, object representation, and executive function. Prerequisite: HDFS 2433 or PSYC 3093. (Typically offered: Spring Even Years)

HDFS 4413H. Honors Infancy: Brain, Learning and Social Cognition. 3 Hours.

Investigation into how brain mechanisms interact with experience to provide the basis for learning and social cognition. Topics include face perception, motor cognition, imitation, joint attention and shared experience, empathy and altruism, theory of mind, social and moral cognition, language, memory, number, geometry and navigation, object representation, and executive function. Prerequisite: Honors standing and HDFS 2433 or PSYC 3093. (Typically offered: Spring Even Years)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 4413.

HDFS 4423. Adult Development. 3 Hours.

Examine individual development beginning with the transition adulthood through middle age; approximate age ranges are 18-60 years. Content focuses on physical, cognitive, psychological, and social changes that occur throughout this period of the life span. The impact of love, work, and family on men's and women's movement through the transitions that comprise adulthood are emphasized. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403 or PSYC 2003 and junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4443. Gerontology. 3 Hours.

Physiological and psychological development of the aging individual, extended family relations, service networks for the elderly, and retirement activities. Some attention to housing and care needs of persons in advanced years. Lecture 3 hours per week. Seminar. Prerequisite: HDFS 1403 (or HDFS 2413 or PSYC 2003 or SCWK 2133) and junior standing. (Typically offered: Spring)

HDFS 4451. Pre-Internship in Human Development and Family Sciences. 1 Hour.

This course prepares students for their internship experience (HDFS 4483) in Human Development and Family Sciences. Topics covered include professional and ethical behavior when working with people, families and communities. The course will also cover professional and career development topics. By the end of the course, students are expected to have secured an internship position suitable for HDFS 4483. Students should enroll in this course no earlier than the semester before they anticipate enrolling in HDFS 4483. Prerequisite: Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer)

HDFS 4473. Multicultural Families. 3 Hours.

The course provides students with opportunities to gain awareness of their own cultures and families, reflect on families from a diverse array of cultures, and develop critical thinking skills needed to effectively engage with people and families from cultures different than their own. Prerequisite: HDFS 2413. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4483. Internship in Human Development and Family Studies. 3 Hours.

The internship experience provides practical experience for students in settings that are designed to serve the needs of individuals and/or families across the life span. Students must work a minimum of 120 hours in the setting. This course must be taken no sooner than the summer following completion of the student's junior year. May be taken for an additional 3 hours of elective credit if the second experience is distinctly different from the first internship. Prerequisite: HDFS 4451 and senior standing. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

HDFS 4493. Public Policy Advocacy for Children and Families. 3 Hours.

Public policy advocacy as related to children and family issues. Strategies for advocacy will be emphasized. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: HDFS 2603 or SOCI 2013, Honors and Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4493H. Honors Public Policy Advocacy for Children and Families. 3 Hours.

Public policy advocacy as related to children and family issues. Strategies for advocacy will be emphasized. Lecture three hours per week. Prerequisite: HDFS 2603 or SOCI 2013, Honors and Junior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)
This course is equivalent to HDFS 4493.

HDFS 4603. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

The course provides a social perspective on environmental issues. It examines the linkage between society, ecological systems and the physical environment. It provides conceptual framework(s) for analyzing environmental issues, considers the role of humans in environmental issues, and enhances understanding the complexity of the relationship between societal organization and environmental change. (Typically offered: Irregular)
This course is cross-listed with SOCI 4603, SUST 4603.

HDFS 4763. Research in HDFS: Methodological Approaches. 3 Hours.

This class introduces the methodology of HDFS and other social sciences in the social world. It covers research design, sampling, measurement, and other topics that underlie the social science conclusions presented to you in other classes. The class begins with an introduction to the goals of social science research, then focuses on the understanding of the 3 validities with which social scientists, and consumer of social science, must concern themselves: Internal, Measurement, and External. Each of these three validities is used as the focus of a course section. The class concludes with a fourth section that integrates these topics and other social science methods. It is recommended that HDFS students complete Rural Families and Communities (HDFS 2603) prior to enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: HDFS major or BRKD major and Junior Standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

HDFS 4773. Research in HDFS: Statistical Approaches. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to analytical approaches to research in human development and family sciences and will examine the principles and practices underlying the development of knowledge in the field. Emphases in this course will be on conducting and evaluating data analyses relevant to human environmental sciences majors. Students will become critical consumers of data and develop basic skills to analyze and interpret their own data. Prerequisite: HDFS major or BRKD major and HDFS 4763. (Typically offered: Spring)

Human Environmental Sciences Courses

HESC 255V. Special Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in the specializations of human environmental sciences. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for degree credit.

HESC 400V. Special Problems. 1-6 Hour.

Special problems. (Typically offered: Fall, Spring and Summer) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC 455V. Special Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

HESC 455VH. Honors Special Topics. 1-6 Hour.

Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Typically offered: Irregular) May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

Nutrition Courses

NUTR 1201. Introduction to the Dietetic Profession. 1 Hour.

Introduction to profession of dietetics and nutrition including history, scope and future of professionals with emphasis on academic preparation, internships, acquisition of professional credentials, career laddering and career opportunities. Guest speakers will supplement lectures and assignments. Prerequisite: HNHI; HNAD or FNAH majors only or by department consent. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NUTR 1213. Fundamentals of Nutrition. 3 Hours.

The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NUTR 1213H. Honors Fundamentals of Nutrition. 3 Hours.

The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)
This course is equivalent to NUTR 1213.

NUTR 2111L. Principles of Foods Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Laboratory exercises and practice applicable of Principles of Foods. Lab 3 hours. Corequisite: NUTR 2113. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NUTR 2113. Principles of Foods. 3 Hours.

Physical and chemical characteristics of foods, organized by food science and nutrition, protein foods, phytochemicals, complex and refined carbohydrates, and fats. Emphasis on food preparation and storage methods and effect on foods. Investigation and practice of food preparation basics, cooking and baking techniques, knife skills, food safety, and sensory evaluation of food. Corequisite: NUTR 2111L. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, HOSP 2611 and (CHEM 1073, or CHEM 1103, or CHEM 1203), and one of the following programs, minors or concentrations: (HNADBS, FNAHBS, HESCBS, NUTR-M, or CATEBS-FCSE). (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NUTR 2203. Sports Nutrition. 3 Hours.

The integration of concepts from nutrition and exercise physiology into an applied multidisciplinary study of how food, beverages and dietary supplements influence physical performance. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213. (Typically offered: Fall and Spring)

NUTR 3003. Nutrition Assessment. 3 Hours.

Principles of nutritional assessment and methodology including anthropometric, biochemical, clinical, and dietary evaluation. Emphasis placed on Nutrition Focused Physical Assessment, the interpretation of indices for all age groups in health and disease for both individuals and groups, and the application of nutrition assessment data in the nutrition care process. Prerequisite: NUTR 3203, junior standing and HNAD/FNAH majors only. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 3101L. Culinary Nutrition Lab. 1 Hour.

Students will explore ways to apply evidence based nutrition research to culinary application. It addresses the fundamental culinary skills and knowledge required to prepare meals that impact the nutritional and sensory appeal of food. Corequisite: NUTR 3103. Prerequisite: NUTR 2113 and NUTR 2111L. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 3103. Culinary Nutrition. 3 Hours.

This course is grounded in a food first approach to health and wellness with an emphasis on disease prevention. Students will study the physical and chemical characteristics of foods that increase nutritional value and will include exploration of the culinary nutrition modification process and application of these concepts to planning nutritionally balanced meals. Corequisite: NUTR 3101L. Prerequisite: NUTR 2113 and NUTR 2111L. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 3203. Human Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Fundamental human nutrition; nutritive value of foods and general functions of nutrients based on concepts derived from inorganic and organic chemistry. Examples relating nutrition to disease used as illustrations to deepen understanding of normal nutrition. Lecture 3 hours per week. Corequisite: CHEM 2613 and CHEM 2611L or CHEM 3603 and CHEM 3601L. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 3213. Nutrition Education and Counseling. 3 Hours.

Introduction to development of communication skills related to educational theory and techniques, development of educational materials, interpersonal communication skills, group dynamics, public speaking, and interviewing techniques. Includes discussion of counseling theory and methods, and how education and counseling are intertwined for nutrition professionals. Includes development of skills in nutrition counseling. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, HNAD or FNAH majors only, and Junior or Senior standing. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 3603. Quantity Foods. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on menu planning for a variety of food service organizations, with consideration of age, special needs, diet type, cultural and ethical parameters. Students will design flavorful and appealing menus that meet current nutrition recommendations, guidelines and budgetary constraints. They will learn recipe standardization, quantity production, and overall quality control. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, HOSP 2603, junior standing and Human Nutrition and Dietetics Bachelor of Science (HNADBS) or Food, Nutrition and Health Bachelor of Science (FNAHBS) majors only. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4001. Nutrition Seminar. 1 Hour.

Presentation and discussion of selected nutrition topics of current interest. Prerequisite: Senior standing and HNHI; HNAD or FNAH majors only. (Typically offered: Spring) May be repeated for up to 2 hours of degree credit.

NUTR 4101L. Research Methods in Nutrition Lab. 1 Hour.

Application of experimental methods for investigations in nutrition research. Pre- or corequisite: STAT 2303 and HNHI; HNAD or FNAH majors with senior standing only. Corequisite: NUTR 4103. Prerequisite: NUTR 2113 and NUTR 2111L. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4103. Research Methods in Nutrition. 3 Hours.

This course will cover applications of experimental methods for investigations in nutrition research and cookery. Corequisite: NUTR 4101L. Pre- or Corequisite: STAT 2303. Prerequisite: NUTR 2113, NUTR 2111L and (Human Nutrition and Hospitality Innovation Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Science (HNHIBS), or Human Nutrition and Dietetics Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Science (HNADBS), or Food, Nutrition and Health Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Sciece (FNAHBS) majors), and senior standing only. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4213. Advanced Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Normal nutrition with emphasis on utilization of nutrients. Lecture and reports on current literature 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 3813 and NUTR 3203. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 4223. Life Cycle Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Study of normal nutrition emphasizing quantitative needs for nutrients as functions of biologic processes that vary during stages of the life cycle. Attention is given to preconception, pregnancy, childhood and older adults. Prerequisite: (HNAD majors and NUTR 3203) or (FNAH majors and junior standing). (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 4243. Community Nutrition. 3 Hours.

Identifying, assessing, and developing solutions for nutritional problems encountered at the local, state, federal, and international levels. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 1213, junior standing, and Food, Nutrition and Health Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Science (FNAHBS) or Human Nutrition and Dietetic Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Science (HNADBS) majors only. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4263. Medical Nutrition Therapy I. 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on the Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Pre- or corequisite: NUTR 3213 and NUTR 4213. Prerequisite: BIOL 2213, BIOL 2211L, CHEM 3813 and NUTR 3003. (Typically offered: Fall)

NUTR 4273. Medical Nutrition Therapy II. 3 Hours.

Principles of medical nutrition therapy with emphasis on the Nutrition Care Process, and the pathophysiology and current standards of practice for diseases and disorders. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: NUTR 4263. (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4303. Cultural Perspectives on Foods. 3 Hours.

Cultural competence is growing in importance as our population becomes more culturally diverse. This course covers cuisine and culture of various regions for the purpose of promoting respect and understanding for cultural diversity. Students will learn the history of foods, ingredients, flavor profiles, religious based food practices, etiquette, and customs. Corequisite: Junior or senior standing, and (Human Nutrition and Dietetics majors (HNADBS) or Food, Nutrition and Health majors (FNAHBS) or Hospitality Management (HOSPBS) majors). (Typically offered: Spring)

NUTR 4403. Recipe Modification. 3 Hours.

Students will use existing research to identify foods with preventative and functional properties and apply that information to develop recipes for improved nutritional quality and disease management. They will gather data to modify and refine the product and create an educational tool to promote their product. Prerequisite: NUTR 3103 and NUTR 3101L. (Typically offered: Spring)