Ashok Saxena
Head of the Department
120 John A. White Jr. Engineering Hall
479-575-4786
http://www.bmeg.uark.edu

Biomedical engineering encompasses the creation, design, and operation, of processes / technology related to the broad field of human healthcare. The profession traditionally has focused on applications related to the development of instrumentation and diagnostic equipment, discovery of novel treatment options, production of new therapeutics, and the elucidation of underlying biophysical phenomena. Newer applications of bioengineering take advantage of the ever deepening understanding of human physiology and molecular genetics, as related to prevention, detection, and treatment of medical conditions. The program objectives of the Biomedical Engineering undergraduate program are to produce graduates who are capable of:

  • Succeeding in the practice of engineering or other professional activities, and
  • Succeeding in post baccalaureate studies.

Completion of the degree requirements provides for the following educational outcomes:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

These educational outcomes are experienced within the context of biology and physiology appropriate to solving problems at the interface of engineering and biology.

Requirements for B.S. in Biomedical Engineering

Technical Options in Biomedical Engineering

Each student in biomedical engineering is required to complete nine semester hours of biomedical engineering technical electives. Biomedical engineering technical elective courses must be selected from a faculty-approved list of courses found in the department's Undergraduate Advising Handbook, which is available on the department's website. Elective courses are chosen with the aid of an academic adviser to better prepare for employment or further study in areas such as:

  • Bioengineering
  • Pharmaceutical manufacturing or pharmacology
  • Biomedical device design
  • Medicine
  • Business
  • Law

Technical Elective Course

Each student in biomedical engineering is required to complete three semester hours of upper level science electives. Upper level (3000 and above) science electives will be chosen from courses in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences with the approval of their adviser. The department maintains a list of approved upper level science electives that may be found in the department's Undergraduate Advising Handbook, which is available on the department's website.

Biomedical Engineering B.S.Bm.E.
Eight-Semester Degree Program

The following section contains the list of courses required for the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering degree and a suggested sequence for students who enter the College through the Freshman Engineering Program. Not all courses are offered every semester, so students who deviate from the suggested sequence must pay careful attention to course scheduling and course prerequisites. Students wishing to follow the eight-semester degree plan should see the Eight-Semester Degree Policy in the Academic Regulations chapter for university requirements of the program.

First YearUnits
FallSpring
ENGL 1013 Composition I (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1013) (Sp, Su, Fa)3  
MATH 2554 Calculus I (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2405) (Sp, Su, Fa)4  
PHYS 2054 University Physics I (ACTS Equivalency = PHYS 2034) (Sp, Su, Fa) (with lab)4  
CHEM 1103 University Chemistry I (ACTS Equivalency = CHEM 1414 Lecture) (Su, Fa)3  
GNEG 1111 Introduction to Engineering I (Sp, Fa)1  
ENGL 1023 Composition II (ACTS Equivalency = ENGL 1023) (Sp, Su, Fa)  3
Freshman Science Elective with lab*  4
MATH 2564 Calculus II (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2505) (Sp, Su, Fa)  4
HIST 2003 History of the American People to 1877 (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2113) (Sp, Su, Fa)
or HIST 2013 History of the American People, 1877 to Present (ACTS Equivalency = HIST 2123) (Sp, Su, Fa)
or PLSC 2003 American National Government (ACTS Equivalency = PLSC 2003) (Sp, Su, Fa)
  3
GNEG 1121 Introduction to Engineering II (Sp, Fa)  1
Year Total: 15 15
 
Second YearUnits
FallSpring
BMEG 2613 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (Fa)3  
MATH 2574 Calculus III (ACTS Equivalency = MATH 2603) (Sp, Su, Fa)4  
Sophomore Science Elective with lab**4  
BIOL 1543 Principles of Biology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lecture) (Sp, Su, Fa)
& BIOL 1541L Principles of Biology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 1014 Lab) (Sp, Su, Fa)
4  
BMEG 2813 Biomechanical Engineering (Sp)  3
BMEG 2904 Biomedical Instrumentation (Sp) (with Lab)  4
MATH 2584 Elementary Differential Equations (Sp, Su, Fa)  4
BIOL 2533 Cell Biology (Sp, Fa)  3
Fine Arts Elective (from Univ/State Core List)  3
Year Total: 15 17
 
Third YearUnits
FallSpring
BMEG 3634 Biomaterials (Fa) (with lab)4  
BMEG 3124 Biomedical Signals and Systems (Fa) (with lab)4  
CHEG 2313 Thermodynamics of Single-Component Systems (Sp, Su, Fa)
or MEEG 2403 Thermodynamics (Sp, Su, Fa)
3  
CHEM 3603 Organic Chemistry I (Su, Fa)
& CHEM 3601L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory (Su, Fa)
4  
Social Science Elective (from Univ/State Core List)3  
BMEG 3653 Biomedical Modeling and Numerical Methods (Sp)  3
BMEG 3824 Biomolecular Engineering (Sp) (with lab)  4
CHEG 2133 Fluid Mechanics (Sp, Su, Fa)
or MEEG 3503 Mechanics of Fluids (Su, Fa)
  3
BIOL 2213 Human Physiology (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2414 Lecture) (Sp, Fa)
& BIOL 2211L Human Physiology Laboratory (ACTS Equivalency = BIOL 2414 Lab) (Sp, Fa)
  4
CHEM 3613 Organic Chemistry II (Sp, Su)
& CHEM 3611L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory (Sp, Su)
  4
Year Total: 18 18
 
Fourth YearUnits
FallSpring
BMEG 4813 Biomedical Engineering Design I (Fa)3  
BMEG 4623 Biomedical Transport Phenomena (Fa)3  
BMEG Elective3  
Science Elective3  
Social Science Elective (from Univ/State Core List)3  
BMEG 4823 Biomedical Engineering Design II (Sp)  3
BMEG Elective  3
BMEG Elective  3
Social Science Elective (from Univ/State Core List)  3
Humanities Elective (from Univ/State Core List)  3
Year Total: 15 15
 
Total Units in Sequence:  128
*

The Freshman Science Elective must be chosen from either CHEM 1123/CHEM 1121L or PHYS 2074.

**

The Sophomore Science Elective must be either PHYS 2074 orCHEM 1123/CHEM 1121L. (Whichever was not chosen as the Freshman Engineering Science Elective).

Biomedical Engineering Technical Electives

BMEG 4103LNanotechnology Laboratory (Fa)3
BMEG 4103MHonors Nanotechnology Laboratory (Fa)3
BMEG 4213Tissue Mechanics (Irregular)3
BMEG 4243Advanced Biomaterials and Biocompatibility (Irregular)3
BMEG 4404Biomedical Microscopy (Irregular)4
BMEG 4413Tissue Engineering (Irregular)3
BMEG 450VHHonors Thesis (Sp, Su)1-4
BMEG 460VIndividual Study (Sp, Su, Fa)1-3
BMEG 460VHHonors Individual Study (Sp, Su, Fa)1-3
BMEG 4743Drug and Gene Delivery (Irregular)3
BMEG 4873Bionanotechnology (Irregular)3
BMEG 4973Regenerative Medicine (Irregular)3
BMEG 470VSpecial Topics in Biomedical Engineering (Irregular)1-4

Honors Program Requirements

Students enrolled in the Honors College who are to receive the Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering must complete a minimum of 12 hours of honors credit. At least 6 hours must be completed within the Biomedical Engineering program including at least 3 hours resulting in an Honors Thesis. The BMEG honors courses are acceptable as engineering electives and in some cases may be substituted for required courses.

Courses

BMEG 2613. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (Fa). 3 Hours.

An introductory course for undergraduate biomedical engineering students. It covers topics such as recombinant DNA technologies, cell and tissue engineering, stem cell and organ regeneration, the biomechanics, bioinstrumentation, engineering of immunity, and bio- and medical imaging, etc. The application of nano-biotechnology in developing clinical products such as tissue engineered products, drug delivery systems, etc. will be emphasized in the course. Prerequisite: GNEG 1121 or GNEG 1103; CHEM 1113 or CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1101L, each with a grade of C or better, and MATH 2554 and PHYS 2054.

BMEG 2813. Biomechanical Engineering (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course introduces basic concepts and principles of biomechanics to biomedical and other engineering students. The course topics include mechanics and materials, viscoelastic properties, bone, cartilage, ligament, tendon, muscle, cardiovascular dynamics, clinical gait analysis, etc. After taking this course, students are expected to understand the application of engineering kinetics to describe motions of human body and mechanic properties of tissues. MATLAB will be used to write and solve biomechanical static and dynamic equations. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: BMEG 2613, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133, MATH 2564, and PHYS 2074.

BMEG 2904. Biomedical Instrumentation (Sp). 4 Hours.

This course is designed for biomedical engineering undergraduate students to learn both theoretical and practical concepts of bioinstrumentation and their applications in modern life science and medicine. Analytical experiments will be practiced in the laboratory along with the lecture section. This course covers basic topics in circuits such as charge current, voltage, resistance, power energy, linear network analysis, inductors, capacitors, operational amplifier, time-varying signals, active analog filters, bioinstrumentation design etc. The application of these principles and theories in bioinstrumentation design and development is particularly emphasized in this course. The lab section requires team work, planning, and data sharing. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BMEG 2613, MATH 2564 and PHYS 2074.

BMEG 3124. Biomedical Signals and Systems (Fa). 4 Hours.

This course will introduce students to the basics of signals - continuous and digital signals, and signal processing tools, such as filters, Laplace and Fourier transforms. The 'systems' aspect of the course will focus on physiological systems and methods to model such systems. The course will also focus on the biomedical applications of these methods through lab components.Prerequisite: BMEG 2904.

BMEG 3634. Biomaterials (Fa). 4 Hours.

Introduction to the engineering properties of materials used in biomedical devices and applications. Topics include: atomic properties, structure-property-processing relationships, bulk engineering properties, surface and interfacial properties and applications of materials in biology and medicine. All topics will be reviewed in the context of specific biomedical devices and the engineering principles involved in their design. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BMEG 2813, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133, and BIOL 1543 and BIOL 1541L.

BMEG 3653. Biomedical Modeling and Numerical Methods (Sp). 3 Hours.

Application of mathematical techniques to physiological systems. The emphasis will be on cellular physiology and cardiovascular system. Cellular physiology topics include models of cellular metabolism, membrane dynamics, membrane potential, excitability, wave propagation and cellular function regulation. Cardiovascular system topics include models of blood cells, oxygen transport, cardiac output, cardiac regulation, and circulation. Prerequisite: BMEG 2613, MATH 2574, and MATH 2584.

BMEG 3653H. Honors Biomedical Modeling and Numerical Methods (Sp). 3 Hours.

Application of mathematical techniques to physiological systems. The emphasis will be on cellular physiology and cardiovascular system. Cellular physiology topics include models of cellular metabolism, membrane dynamics, membrane potential, excitability, wave propagation and cellular function regulation. Cardiovascular system topics include models of blood cells, oxygen transport, cardiac output, cardiac regulation, and circulation. Prerequisite: BMEG 2613, MATH 2574, and MATH 2584.

This course is equivalent to BMEG 3653.

BMEG 3824. Biomolecular Engineering (Sp). 4 Hours.

Biomolecular Engineering is to design and produce biomolecules, especially proteins, for uses ranging from pharmaceuticals, materials, sensors, transducers, to functional interfaces with conventional engineering materials. The course begins with an introduction to the tools and techniques of molecular biology that are used for protein engineering. Additional topics include recombinant DNA techniques, biochemical kinetics, cell growth reaction and kinetics, bioreactors, membrane processes, and bioproduct purification. There is an associated laboratory with exercises related to lecture topics. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BMEG 3634, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133, and BIOL 2533.

BMEG 3824H. Honors Biomolecular Engineering (Sp). 4 Hours.

Biomolecular Engineering is to design and produce biomolecules, especially proteins, for uses ranging from pharmaceuticals, materials, sensors, transducers, to functional interfaces with conventional engineering materials. The course begins with an introduction to the tools and techniques of molecular biology that are used for protein engineering. Additional topics include recombinant DNA techniques, biochemical kinetics, cell growth reaction and kinetics, bioreactors, membrane processes, and bioproduct purification. There is an associated laboratory with exercises related to lecture topics. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BMEG 3634, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133, and BIOL 2533.

This course is equivalent to BMEG 3824.

BMEG 4103L. Nanotechnology Laboratory (Fa). 3 Hours.

Provides students with hands-on experience in several major areas of nanotechnology, including nanoscale imaging, synthesis of nanomaterials, nanostructure assembly and manipulation, device and system integration, and performance evaluation. Students can earn credit for only one of the following courses: MEEG 4323L, BENG 4753L, BMEG 4103L, CHEM 4153L, PHYS 4793L. Corequisite: Drill component, junior standing and instructor consent. Prerequisite: MATH 2564, PHYS 2074, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133.

This course is cross-listed with MEEG 4323L, CHEM 4153L, PHYS 4793L.

BMEG 4103M. Honors Nanotechnology Laboratory (Fa). 3 Hours.

Provides students with hands-on experience in several major areas of nanotechnology, including nanoscale imaging, synthesis of nanomaterials, nanostructure assembly and manipulation, device and system integration, and performance evaluation. Students can earn credit for only one of the following courses: MEEG 4323L, BENG 4753L, BMEG 4103L, CHEM 4153L, PHYS 4793L. Corequisite: Drill component, junior standing and instructor consent. Prerequisite: MATH 2564, PHYS 2074, CHEM 1123 or CHEM 1133.

This course is cross-listed with MEEG 4323L, CHEM 4153L, PHYS 4793L.

BMEG 4213. Tissue Mechanics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to non-linear biomechanics of soft tissues such as skin, bladder, blood vessels, and the brain. Topics covered: Tissue mechanics: continuum biomechanics, tensor analysis, kinematics of continua, balance laws. Governing physics of mechanics as applied to soft tissues. Various constitutive relations will be discussed: linear elastic, hyperelastic, viscoelastic, poroelastic, and inelastic materials with internal variables. Cannot receive credit for both BMEG 4213 and BMEG 5213.Prerequisite: BMEG 2813, BMEG major and Senior standing.

BMEG 4243. Advanced Biomaterials and Biocompatibility (Irregular). 3 Hours.

From Absorbable sutures to Zirconium alloy hip implants, biomaterials science influences nearly every aspect of medicine. This course focuses on the study of different classes of biomaterials and their interactions with human tissues. Topics include: biocompatibility; biofouling; hemocompatibility; wound healing response; foreign body response; design of orthopedic, dental and cardiovascular implants; opthalmological and dermatological materials; degradable polymers for drug delivery; nanobiomaterials; smart biomaterials and the regulation of devices and materials by the FDA. Pre- or Corequisite: BMEG 4623. Prerequisite: BMEG 3634.

BMEG 4404. Biomedical Microscopy (Irregular). 4 Hours.

An advanced course covering light microscopy techniques, conjugate image planes, principles of contrast, fluorescence imaging, confocal and multi-photon microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, image reconstruction and digital image processing with supporting units in tissue culture and histology. Prerequisite: BMEG 2904, PHYS 2074, BMEG major and Senior standing.

BMEG 4413. Tissue Engineering (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course introduces Tissue Engineering approaches at genetic and molecular, cellular, tissue, and organ levels. Topics include cell and tissue in vitro expansion, tissue organization, signaling molecules, stem cell and stem cell differentiation, organ regeneration, biomaterial and matrix for tissue engineering, bioreactor design for cell and tissue culture, dynamic and transportation in cell and tissue cultures, clinical implementation of tissue engineered products, and tissue-engineered devices. Prerequisite: BMEG 3824 and BIOL 2533.

BMEG 450VH. Honors Thesis (Sp, Su). 1-4 Hour.

Provides Biomedical Engineering students an opportunity to explore a topic in depth through an independent research or design project. Prerequisite: Honors standing. May be repeated for degree credit.

BMEG 4513. Biomedical Optics and Imaging (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of various biomedical imaging modalities. Topics will include: Basics of light-tissue interaction - absorption, fluorescence, elastic and inelastic scattering; Computational and analytical models of light propagation to quantify tissue optical properties; Optical imaging techniques spectroscopy, tomography, and laser speckle with potential clinical applications; and Clinical imaging modalities and recent advances X-ray, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Computed Tomography (CT), Ultrasound imaging, and Photoacoustic imaging. At the end of this course, students should have a good understanding of optical imaging, spectroscopy, and non-optical imaging modalities, specific anatomical sites that they are best suited for, and the trade-offs between imaging depth and resolution. Students may not receive credit for both BMEG 4513 and BMEG 5513. Prerequisite: BMEG 2904 and senior standing.

BMEG 460V. Individual Study (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-3 Hour.

Individual study and research of a topic mutually agreeable to the student and faculty member. May be repeated for degree credit.

BMEG 460VH. Honors Individual Study (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-3 Hour.

Individual study and research of a topic mutually agreeable to the student and faculty member. May be repeated for degree credit.

This course is equivalent to BMEG 460V.

BMEG 4623. Biomedical Transport Phenomena (Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to the modeling of complex biological systems using principles of transport phenomena and biochemical kinetics. This course will cover molecular transport due to velocity, concentration and thermal gradients. Topics include the conservation relations; rheology of Newtonian and non-Newtonian physiological fluids; regulation of blood flow; steady and transient diffusion in reacting systems; dimensional analysis; transport processes in disease pathology. Prerequisite: BMEG 3653, CHEG 2133 or MEEG 3503, CHEG 2313 or MEEG 2403, MATH 2574 and MATH 2584.

BMEG 4623H. Honors Biomedical Transport Phenomena (Fa). 3 Hours.

An introduction to the modeling of complex biological systems using principles of transport phenomena and biochemical kinetics. This course will cover molecular transport due to velocity, concentration and thermal gradients. Topics include the conservation relations; rheology of Newtonian and non-Newtonian physiological fluids; regulation of blood flow; steady and transient diffusion in reacting systems; dimensional analysis; transport processes in disease pathology. Prerequisite: BMEG 3653, CHEG 2133 or MEEG 3503, CHEG 2313 or MEEG 2403, MATH 2574 and MATH 2584.

This course is equivalent to BMEG 4623.

BMEG 470V. Special Topics in Biomedical Engineering (Irregular). 1-4 Hour.

Consideration of current biomedical engineering topics not covered in other courses. Prerequisite: Senior standing. May be repeated for degree credit.

BMEG 4743. Drug and Gene Delivery (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An advanced course covering important issues in drug and gene delivery in tumor and normal tissues. The course emphasizes quantitative analysis of molecule and nanoparticle transport through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Various engineering-related topics on drug and gene delivery are discussed. These topics include physiologically-based pharmacokinetic analysis, transvascular transport, interstitial transport, transport across cell membrane, drug and gene carriers, targeted delivery of drugs, oxygen transport, delivery of effector cells and genes. Pre- or Corequisite: BMEG 4623.

BMEG 4813. Biomedical Engineering Design I (Fa). 3 Hours.

First semester of a two semester capstone biomedical engineering design class covered from the perspective of FDA design mandates. Students will design and prototype a medical device using Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requirements for Design Control. The course is designed as a partnership between end users (clinicians and patients) and student engineering teams. The users supply the ideas and clinical relevancy while the student teams develop requirements, build prototypes and conduct testing. The course is designed to mirror the FDA regulated product design approach that is taken by industry thereby exposing students to current best practices. All projects will be planned, managed and executed using FDA Design Control Requirements. To accomplish this, projects will utilize customer driven inputs to motivate the development of product specifications. Prototypes will be fabricated based on these specifications. The prototypes will be tested and evaluated to ensure the specifications are met. All projects will be implemented using a planned, multidisciplinary, ethics-based team approach. Corequisite: Lab component. Pre- or Corequisite: BMEG 4623.

BMEG 4823. Biomedical Engineering Design II (Sp). 3 Hours.

Continuation of BMEG 4813. Initial designs will be prototyped before going through a design review. Design verification issues and improvements will then be solved in a redesign phase following a design process based on Food and Drug Administration Quality System Regulation (FDA-QSR). Projects will be team oriented and lead to increased project management skills. In addition, discussions on design considerations will continue. A final written design document and an oral presentation of the working prototype will culminate the class. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: BMEG 4813.

BMEG 4873. Bionanotechnology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course relevant to bionanotechnology. The topics covered in this course include nanobiomaterials, nanoparticles, nanowires, nanobiochips, nanobiosensors, and nanobiodevides. The applications of these nanomaterials and devices in clinical diagnostics, disease treatment, point-of-care test and/or point-of-care diagnostics, tele-medical cares, controlled and targeted drug delivery, etc. will be particularly emphasized in the lecture. Prerequisite: BMEG 2813, BMEG 3824, and CHEG 2133 or MEEG 3503.

BMEG 4973. Regenerative Medicine (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This is an advanced course focusing on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Topics include stem cell tissue engineering, cell signaling, transport and kinetics, biomaterials and scaffolds, surface interactions, viral and nonviral-based gene delivery, tissue engineered organs, organ transplantation, nanomedicine, cell replacement therapy, and organ regenerative therapy. Technologies used to grow clinical relevant cells and tissues in lab will also be discussed in this course. Pre- or corequisite: BMEG 4623.

Kartik Balachandran, Assistant Professor
Hanna Katariina Jensen, Research Assistant Professor
Morten O. Jensen, Associate Professor
Myunghee Michelle Kim, Cinical Assistant Professor
Timothy J. Muldoon, Assistant Professor
Priyaveena Puvanakrishnan, Instructor
Xianghong Qian, Associate Professor
Kyle P. Quinn, Assistant Professor
Narasimhan Rajaram, Assistant Professor
Ashok Saxena, Distinguished Professor, Twenty-First Century Endowed Chair in Materials Science and Engineering
Jeffrey Collins Wolchok, Assistant Professor
David A. Zaharoff, Associate Professor