Douglas Rhoads
Director
Email: drhoads@uark.edu 

Adnan Al-Rubaye
Associate Director
Email:  aakhalaf@uark.edu

Terri Fisher
Interdisciplinary Secretary
213 Gearhart Hall
479-575-4401
E-mail: tfisher@uark.edu

http://cemb.uark.edu/ 

Degrees Conferred:

M.S., Ph.D. (CEMB)

Areas of Concentration: Graduate studies may be pursued in any area of cell or molecular biology, including the study of various aspects of cell function, structure, metabolism, and chemical functions on, within, and between cells; the study of biomolecular interactions; the relationships between biomolecular reactions and observed cellular properties; molecular genetics, protein chemistry, biological structures; as well as the use of molecular detection methods to detect or characterize biological states in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, systematics, forensics, or health care.

Admission to Degree Program: All applicants must have a B.A. or B.S. in a basic or applied science. Applicants must present Graduate Record Examination scores for the Verbal and Quantitative tests, and the GRE writing instrument. For admission, a student must have a sponsoring faculty member. The sponsoring faculty member will submit probable thesis subjects to the Program Committee prior to acceptance of the student. Once an applicant has been approved by the Program Committee, applications are forwarded to the Graduate School for application for admission to the Graduate School. Admitted and sponsored students will be responsible for the Graduate School’s application fee unless paid by the department of the sponsoring faculty member.  When deemed appropriate by the Director and Program Advisory Committee, the Cell and Molecular Biology program will allow a qualified applicant to be admitted to complete research rotations through up to three designated research laboratories during his/her first semester enrolled in the Cell and Molecular Biology graduate program.  Admission for research rotations is contingent up:  1) Stipend support has been guaranteed for the student during the rotation semesters; and 2) the Cell and Molecular Biology faculty designated for the rotation have agreed to host the student during this period.  After the rotation period, the student must obtain a faculty research sponsor.

Requirements for the Master of Science Degree: For the M.S. degree, the Graduate School and/or the program requires 30 semester hours, a comprehensive examination, a cumulative GPA of 3.00, and a minimum residence of 30 weeks. Any student who receives a grade of “F” in any graduate-level course will be subject to dismissal following review by the Program Advisory Committee. All candidates for the M.S. must complete a minimum of 24 hours of post-baccalaureate graduate credits not including seminar and thesis credit hours (18 hours plus CHEM 5813 and CHEM 5843) in Cell and Molecular Biology-approved courses and 6 hours of thesis research. In addition, all candidates who are considered full-time must enroll every fall and spring semester in a Cell and Molecular Biology designated seminar course. Graduate advisory and thesis committees will consist of at least three program faculty representing at least two different departments. With the approval of the student’s Graduate Advisory Committee, up to 6 hours of alternative graduate courses may be used to satisfy the 24 hours of course work. All M.S. candidates must complete a thesis based on their research and pass a comprehensive oral examination based on the thesis. Examination and approval of the thesis is by the student’s Graduate Thesis Committee. Just prior to the Final Examination, the M.S. candidate will present a public seminar announced to all Cell and Molecular Biology faculty and students.

Students should also be aware of Graduate School requirements with regard to master's degrees.

Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree: Candidates for the Ph.D. must complete 18 hours of dissertation research. Students wishing to bypass the M.S. for a Ph.D. must complete a minimum of 24 hours of course work in Cell and Molecular Biology approved course work and a minimum of 18 hours of dissertation research. In addition, all candidates who are considered full-time must enroll every fall and spring semester in a Cell and Molecular Biology designated seminar course. Graduate advisory and dissertation committees will consist of at least four program faculty representing at least two different departments. With the approval of the student’s Graduate Advisory Committee, up to 6 hours of alternative graduate courses may be used to satisfy the 24 hours of course work. Any student who receives a grade of “D” or “F” in any graduate-level course will be subject to dismissal following review by the Program Advisory Committee. Any student receiving more than two grades of “C” in courses of two or more credit hours is no longer eligible for the Ph.D., but may elect to complete an M.S. degree in the program

Candidates for the Ph.D. who do not meet the requirement for proficiency in spoken English at the time of admission must demonstrate proficiency in spoken English through a university-accepted examination prior to their candidacy exam.  English proficiency courses are available at the University of Arkansas to help in this effort.  Meeting this language requirement will not only prepare candidates for communication in oral examinations, research groups, national meetings, and interviews, but will also (in conjunction with the written language evaluation) enable students to serve as teaching assistants, providing an alternative mechanism for support in the event that other support is unavailable.

All Ph.D. students must complete the Candidacy Examination. The Candidacy Examination for the Ph.D. will consist of the writing of an original research proposal using the guidelines for a federally funded post-doctoral fellowship (e.g., NIH, NSF, USDA) and an oral examination over the proposal, related subjects, and general knowledge. The written and oral portions of the candidacy examination must be completed within the Ph.D. candidate’s first two calendar years in this program.

Students in the Ph.D. track will, in collaboration with their Graduate Advisory Committee, select a topic and format for their research proposal within the first year in the program. The proposal topic is to be within the field of Cell and Molecular Biology but on a subject distinct from the student’s Ph.D. research. The written proposal is submitted to the student’s Graduate Advisory Committee for evaluation and approval or rejection. Students may submit the proposal more than once. Upon completion of an approved proposal the candidate must then pass an oral examination by the student’s Graduate Advisory Committee covering the proposal, related subjects as determined by the examining committee, and general knowledge relevant to research in Cell and Molecular Biology.

Only upon satisfactory completion of the proposal and oral examination, as judged by the student’s Graduate Advisory Committee, does a student become a candidate for the Ph.D. Students who fail to complete the candidacy examination in the allotted time will be dropped from the Ph.D. program but may choose to become candidates for the M.S. The Ph.D. is granted not only for fulfillment of technical requirements but also for development and possession of critical and creative thought abilities in the areas of Cell and Molecular Biology. Evidence of these abilities is given through the completion of a dissertation. The student’s Graduate Dissertation Committee will evaluate the dissertation and conduct an oral Final Examination of the candidate over the dissertation and any other subject matter deemed appropriate by the committee. Administration of the final oral defense will follow the Graduate School guidelines outlined in the Graduate Catalog. Just prior to the Final Examination, the Ph.D. candidate will present a public seminar announced to all CEMB faculty and students.

Students should also be aware of Graduate School requirements with regard to doctoral degrees.

Courses

CEMB 590V. Special Topics in Cell and Molecular Biology (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Consideration of new areas in Cell and Molecular Biology not yet treated adequately in textbooks or in other courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

CEMB 5911. Seminar in Cell and Molecular Biology (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Discussion of current topics in Cell and Molecular Biology. All graduate students in the Cell and Molecular Biology degree program must enroll every fall and spring semester in this course or an approved alternate seminar course. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. May be repeated for degree credit.

This course is cross-listed with BIOL 5001.

CEMB 600V. Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Master's thesis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CEMB 700V. Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral dissertation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Paul D. Adams, Associate Professor
Andrew James Alverson, Assistant Professor
Nick Anthony, Professor
Ravi Damodar Barabote, Assistant Professor
Jamie I. Baum, Assistant Professor
Robert R. Beitle Jr., Professor
Burt H. Bluhm, Associate Professor
Walter G. Bottje, Professor
Nilda Roma Burgos, Professor
Jingyi Chen, Associate Professor
Jim Correll, Professor
Dan Donoghue, Professor
Marlis R. Douglas, Associate Professor, Bruker Life Sciences Chair
Michael Edward Douglas, Professor, 21st Century Chair in Global Change Biology
Ashley Patrick Gregg Dowling, Associate Professor
Yuchun Du, Associate Professor
Jeannine M. Durdik, Professor
Gisela F. Erf, Professor, Avian Immunology Professorship
William J. Etges, Professor
Timothy A. Evans, Assistant Professor
Ingrid Fritsch, Professor
Robyn Goforth, Research Assistant Professor
Fiona Goggin, Professor
Billy M. Hargis, Professor, Sustainable Poultry Health Chair
Ralph Leroy Henry, Distinguished Professor, W.M. Keck Endowed Professorship
Christa Hestekin, Associate Professor, Ansel and Virginia Condray Endowed Professorship in Chemical Engineering
Navam S. Hettiarachchy, University Professor
Mack Ivey, Associate Professor
Jin-Woo Kim, Professor
Roger E. Koeppe II, Distinguished Professor
Byung-Whi Kong, Associate Professor
Ken L. Korth, Professor
Timothy Alan Kral, Professor
Wayne J. Kuenzel, Professor
Young Min Kwon, Associate Professor
Jackson Lay Jr., Professor
Michael Herbert Lehmann, Associate Professor
Daniel J. Lessner, Associate Professor
Jeffrey A. Lewis, Assistant Professor
Jiali Li, Professor
Yanbin Li, Distinguished Professor, Tyson Endowed Chair in Biosensing Engineering
Matt McIntosh, Professor
David S. McNabb, Associate Professor
Frank Millett, Distinguished Professor
David W. Paul, Associate Professor
Andy Pereira, Professor
Ines Pinto, Associate Professor
Douglas Duane Rhoads, University Professor
Steven C. Ricke, Professor, Donald "Buddy" Wray Chair in Food Safety
Donald K. Roper, Associate Professor, Charles W. Oxford Professorship in Emerging Technologies
Rick Rorie, Professor
Charles F. Rosenkrans Jr., Professor
Craig S. Rothrock, Professor
Joshua Sakon, Professor
Mary Cathleen Savin, Professor
Shannon Servoss, Associate Professor, Ralph E. Martin Professorship in Chemical Engineering
Jeffrey Donald Silberman, Associate Professor
Nancy J. Smith-Blair, Associate Professor
Frederick W. Spiegel, Distinguished Professor
Vibha Srivastava, Professor
Julie A. Stenken, Professor, 21st Century Chair of Proteomics
Steven Lee Stephenson, Research Professor
Wesley Stites, Professor
Allen Lawrence Szalanski, Professor
Suresh Thallapuranam, Professor
Ryan Tian, Associate Professor
Christian K. Tipsmark, Associate Professor
Ioannis E. Tzanetakis, Associate Professor
Robert F. Wideman Jr., Professor
Charles L. Wilkins, Distinguished Professor
Jeffrey Collins Wolchok, Assistant Professor
David A. Zaharoff, Associate Professor