Professor of Military Science and Leadership
Lieutenant Colonel Chad B. Quayle

106 Army ROTC Building, 479-575-4251

Toll Free: 1-866-891-5538, Fax: 479-575-5855
Email: armyrotc@cavern.uark.edu
World Wide Web: armyrotc.uark.edu

Army ROTC teaches you how to lead. It is one of the best leadership courses in the country and you can make it a part of your academic curriculum here at the University of Arkansas. Army ROTC is an elective curriculum you take along with your required college courses that gives you the tools, training and experiences that will help you succeed in any competitive environment. Participation in the Army ROTC program while pursuing your academic degree offers you the opportunity to earn a commission as a second lieutenant and serve on active duty or in the National Guard or Army Reserve upon graduation.

The traditional four-year Army ROTC Program is divided into a two-year basic course (1000- and 2000-level Military Science classes) and a two-year advanced course (3000- and 4000-level Military Science classes). Students may enroll in the basic course without incurring any military service obligation.

Basic Course Requirements

The first two years of instruction introduce the student to fundamental military and leadership subjects. Students normally take the basic course sequence over four successive semesters, but the basic courses can be completed in as few as two semesters. Students should discuss available options with the Recruitment and Operations Officer before registering for courses if they have fewer than four semesters to complete the basic course.

The regular curriculum consists of a lecture and lab each semester. Freshmen are encouraged to take MILS 1001 Basic Introductory Course to Military Leadership I (Fa) in the fall and MILS 1011 Introduction to Military Leadership II (Sp) in the spring. Both classes are 1 credit hour classes that have 1 hour of classroom instruction and 2 hours of lab per week. Sophomores are encouraged to take MILS 2002 Leadership Development I (Fa) in the fall and MILS 2012 Leadership Development II (Sp) in the spring. Both of the 2000-level classes are 2 credit hour classes that have 2 hours of classroom instruction and 3 hours of lab per week. Labs provide the opportunity for the practical application of leadership concepts and tactical military skills training such as map reading, land navigation, field training, and rifle/pistol marksmanship.

Advanced Course Requirements

Students who have completed the basic course sequence or an equivalency (see Two-Year Program), have met all enrollment eligibility criteria continue into the advanced course. To enroll in the advanced course, students must meet eligibility and age requirements, be physically qualified, have two academic years to complete before graduation or reception of a graduate degree, have a minimum grade point average of 2.0, be accepted by the professor of military science, and be a U.S. citizen. This advanced course curriculum consists of the following courses that include corresponding leadership labs, physical fitness training sessions, and a four-week summer camp (Advanced Camp) at Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Course List
MILS 3004Applied Leadership I (Fa)4
MILS 3014Applied Leadership II (Sp)4
MILS 4004Advanced Leadership I (Fa)4
MILS 4014Advanced Leadership II (Sp)4

During labs and physical training sessions students receive practical leadership opportunities to prepare them for summer camp and their future military careers. Students normally attend Advanced Camp in the summer between their junior and senior years. Students must complete all of the courses listed above and satisfactorily complete Advanced Camp to earn a commission.

Army ROTC students who receive an Army ROTC scholarship or enter the Army ROTC Advanced Course must agree to complete a period of service with the U.S. Army. You can serve full time in the Army for three years (four years for scholarship winners). Selected cadets may choose to serve part time in the U.S. Army Reserve or Army National Guard while pursuing a civilian career.

Two-Year Program

Students who are veterans, members of the Army National Guard/Army Reserve, or who have participated in the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Program in high school may qualify for direct entry into the advanced course with the approval of the Professor of Military Science. Students who did not complete the ROTC basic course curriculum (see above) but have two years of academic study remaining may be eligible to attend Basic Camp to satisfy the basic course requirements. Basic Camp, held at Fort Knox, Kentucky, during the summer, introduces the student to the Army and covers the requirements for the basic course in 28 days. Students who believe they qualify for this program should consult with the Scholarship and Enrollment Officer for more information.

Scholarships

Qualified students may compete for Army ROTC scholarships ranging from two to four years in duration. The Army provides scholarships for those who desire to serve on Active Duty, in the National Guard, or in the Army Reserve. Students must be enrolled and participating in Army ROTC to be eligible for scholarships. Scholarships are merit based and pay full tuition and fees (both in and out-of-state) or room and board (capped at $5,000/semester) but not both, $600 per semester for textbooks and laboratory expenses, and a tax fee subsistence stipend of $300–$500 for each month of the regular school year depending on Military Science level. Interested students should consult with the Scholarship and Enrollment Officer for more detailed information concerning the scholarship eligibility requirements. For additional information about Army ROTC, students may contact Mr. Oscar Rayford in the Department of Military Science, 479-575-5853, olrayfor@uark.edu.

Courses

MILS 1001. Basic Introductory Course to Military Leadership I (Fa). 1 Hour.

Incorporates various outdoor field craft skills involving both classroom and outdoor instruction. Subjects include small group leadership, rappelling, basic map reading, water safety and first aid. Introduction to organization, values, ethics, personal development and the role of the Army. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

MILS 1011. Introduction to Military Leadership II (Sp). 1 Hour.

Incorporates various outdoor field craft involving both classroom and outdoor instruction, intermediate map reading/orienteering, first aid and outdoor cold/hot weather survival skills. Introduction to small group leadership principles. Personal development, ethics, values and the 7 Army values and the role that the Army plays in today's society and world. Classroom 1 hour per week. Lab 2 hours per week. Corequisite: Lab component.

MILS 1101. Basic Marksmanship (Fa). 1 Hour.

Introduction to safe use of a rifle and practical application of rifle marksmanship. Course includes weapons safety, mechanics, capabilities, and fundamentals of marksmanship. Includes visit to fire at a local indoor rifle range. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science.

MILS 1211. Basic Outdoor Field Craft and Skills (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Introduction to basic military survival skills and outdoor field craft. Subjects include cold/hot weather survival, water procurement methods, expedient field shelters, signaling, map reading and rappelling technique. Materials and equipment furnished by Department of Military Science. Classroom 2 hours per week.

MILS 2002. Leadership Development I (Fa). 2 Hours.

Continuation of basic skills presented in MILS 1001 and MILS 1011. Course focus is on small unit leadership, team building and management skills. Includes an introduction to small unit tactics. Students develop leadership foundations by leading discussions, developing and briefing operation plans using the military decision making model. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS 2012. Leadership Development II (Sp). 2 Hours.

Continuation of leadership skills presented in MILS 2002. Course focus is on decision making process, time management, and leadership skills. Includes an introduction to military writing and basic tactics. Cadets continue training in land navigation, first aid, and outdoor field craft. Classroom 2 hours per week. Lab 1 hour per week. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: MILS 1001 and MILS 1011 or approval of Professor of Military Science.

MILS 2101. Advanced Rifle Marksmanship (Sp). 1 Hour.

Course to teach students the fundamentals of Advanced Rifle Marksmanship. Class is conducted once a week with topics including: Air rifle, small bore firing, advanced practical exercises of different shooting positions and marksmanship competition with other universities. Prerequisite: MILS 1101.

MILS 3004. Applied Leadership I (Fa). 4 Hours.

Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces. Students must also obtain consent from the MSIII Advisor and the Professor of Military Science.

MILS 3014. Applied Leadership II (Sp). 4 Hours.

Development of managerial and leadership abilities, maximizing performance-oriented 'hands-on' training. Students learn advanced infantry tactics and demonstrate their leadership potential using this medium. Students are required to lead in drill and ceremony, physical training, and tactical infantry situations. The training is intended to prepare the student for the ROTC Advanced Camp experienced normally in the summer prior to the senior year or 4th year of ROTC. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours per week, plus 3 hours of physical training are conducted weekly. One weekend field training exercise is required per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Junior standing plus one of the following conditions: completion of ROTC basic camp, veteran status, or completion of basic training with any component of the U.S. Armed Forces. Students must also obtain consent from the MSIII Advisor and the Professor of Military Science.

MILS 4001. Advanced Military Issues (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Individual study for advanced undergraduates. Students will research, write a paper, and give an oral presentation of a current military issue. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS 4004. Advanced Leadership I (Fa). 4 Hours.

The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work (MILS 3004 and MILS 3014).

MILS 4011. Advanced Military Correspondence (Sp, Fa). 1 Hour.

Practicum for advanced undergraduates. Students submit prepared military correspondence projects written in the military style using military forms and formats. Prerequisite: PMS approval.

MILS 4014. Advanced Leadership II (Sp). 4 Hours.

The study of various military organizations and their role in military operations. Discussion of command and staff management in military organizations, executive responsibility of Army commissioned officers, service customs, courtesies, and traditions. The senior year includes the study of personnel management, professional ethics, the military justice system, and the Army's training and maintenance management system. Lecture 3 hours, laboratory 3 hours, physical training 3 hours per week. MS IV cadets plan and participate in 1 field training exercise per semester. Corequisite: Lab component. Prerequisite: Successful completion of MS III course work.