Courses

PHIL 1003. Critical Reasoning: Discovery, Deduction, and Intellectual Self-Defense (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This is a practical, "hands-on" course in sound reasoning, critical thinking, and the careful evaluation of evidence and argument. The course will utilize a range of real-world sources (television, Internet, magazines, etc.) and will be informed in content and method by the psychology of human judgment.

PHIL 1503. Special Topics in Philosophy and Culture (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Exploration of introductory-level special topics of an issue or issues in contemporary culture not otherwise covered in the philosophy curriculum.

PHIL 2003. Introduction to Philosophy (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1103) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

An examination of such basic philosophical topics as the existence of God, the nature of the human mind, the relationship between appearance and reality, the forms and limits of human knowledge, freedom of the will, and standards of right and wrong. Includes both historical and contemporary readings.

PHIL 2003C. Introduction to Philosophy (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

An examination of such basic philosophical topics as the existence of God, the nature of the human mind, the relationship between appearance and reality, the forms and limits of human knowledge, freedom of the will, and standards of right and wrong. Includes both historical and contemporary readings. Corequisite: Drill component.

This course is equivalent to PHIL 2003.

PHIL 2003H. Honors Introduction to Philosophy (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

An examination of such basic philosophical topics as the existence of God, the nature of the human mind, the relationship between appearance and reality, the forms and limits of human knowledge, freedom of the will, and standards of right and wrong. Includes both historical and contemporary readings.

This course is equivalent to PHIL 2003.

PHIL 2103. Introduction to Ethics (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Basic concepts of moral philosophy, including historical and contemporary literature concerned with such issues as ethical relativism vs. objectivism, duty, happiness, freedom of the will and responsibility, facts and values, individual liberty and society. Application of theories to substantive questions.

PHIL 2203. Logic (ACTS Equivalency = PHIL 1003) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Traditional and modern methods of deductive and inductive inference. Degree credit may not be earned for both PHIL1203 and PHIL 2203.

PHIL 2303. Human Nature and the Meaning of Life (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examination of important views on human nature, the meaning of human existence, the value and significance of different human activities and projects, and on what philosophy, religion, art, and literature have to teach us on these topics. Reading may be drawn from a variety of philosophical, literary, and religious writings.

PHIL 2503. Philosophical Explorations (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Explores topics in philosophy that are not currently covered in lower-level philosophy courses.

PHIL 3103. Ethics and the Professions (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

After a survey of the standard theories of moral obligation, justice, and rights, the course focuses on specific moral problems that arise within engineering, business, and the professions.

PHIL 3113. Environmental Ethics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The course addresses ethical questions about nature and the natural environment. Topics of discussion include anthropocentric and biocentric ethics, population control, obligations to future generations, animal rights, moral considerability, Leopold's land ethic, deep ecology, and ecofeminism.

This course is cross-listed with ENSC 3933.

PHIL 3123. Bioethics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course examines ethical dilemmas that arise in biological research, medical research, medical practice, and healthcare policy. Topics may include such things as abortion, assisted reproduction, cloning & genetic engineering, assisted suicide & voluntary euthanasia, organ donation, research ethics, patient autonomy, and healthcare policy.

PHIL 3203. Philosophy and the Christian Faith (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course will deal with philosophical issues that arise in Christian theology. Topics to be discussed may include the doctrines of the Incarnation, the Trinity, Atonement, and Hell, as well as the nature of God and the relationship between faith and reason.

PHIL 3443. Animal Minds (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course explores questions about thinking, consciousness, emotion, and communication in non-human animals; about the differences between human and non-human animals; and about implications for our treatment of animals.

PHIL 390V. Readings (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

PHIL 3923H. Honors Colloquium (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Treats a special topic of issue offered as part of the honors program. Prerequisite: honors candidacy (not restricted to candidacy in philosophy). May be repeated for degree credit.

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 3933.

PHIL 3933. Special Studies (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A course (not independent study) which covers a topic or a philosopher not usually presented in depth in regular courses. May be repeated for degree credit.

This course is cross-listed with PHIL 3923H.

PHIL 3943. Philosophy and Physics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examination of the metaphysical and epistemological implications of specific physical theories with an emphasis on twentieth-century physics. Topics covered may include the nature of space and time (particularly as described in relativity theory), the nature of the quantum mechanical world, and the temporal asymmetries found in thermodynamics and other areas of physics.

PHIL 399VH. Honors Course (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Prerequisite: Junior standing. May be repeated for up to 12 hours of degree credit.

PHIL 4003. Ancient Greek Philosophy (Fa). 3 Hours.

Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4013. Platonism and Origin of Christian Theology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

The study of Plato, Middle Platonism, and Neoplatonism, including Philo, Plotinus, and Proclus, and the influence of Platonism on the Greek church fathers of the 2nd-5th centuries, principally Origen and Gregory of Nyssa and also Pseudo-Dionysius. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4023. Medieval Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Includes Augustine, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham.

PHIL 4033. Modern Philosophy-17th and 18th Centuries (Sp). 3 Hours.

British and Continental philosophy, including Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.

PHIL 4043. Nineteenth Century Continental Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Study of major Continental European philosophers of the 19th century including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche. Emphasis on the nature of persons, the question of freedom, and the importance of self-expression, as well as views on knowledge, reality, and the nature of philosophy. Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy.

PHIL 4063. Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Study of major figures (e.g. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Foucault, Derrida) and trends (phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, critical theory, deconstruction) in 20th century French and German thought. Topics include human beings and their place in the world, the role of history and culture, and the possibility of critical reflection.

PHIL 4073. History of Analytic Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

From Frege to recent figures, including Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Schlick, Carnap, Ayer, Ryle, Strawson, Quine, including a representative sample of works on the logical analysis of language, logical positivism, and ordinary language analysis. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4093. Special Topics in Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This course will cover subject matter not covered in regularly offered courses. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

PHIL 4103. Modern Jewish Thought (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A survey of the main trends in Jewish thought from the seventeenth through the nineteenth century.

This course is cross-listed with JWST 4003.

PHIL 4113. Social and Political Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Selected philosophical theories of society, the state, social justice, and their connections with individuals.

PHIL 4123. Classical Ethical Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Study of classical texts in the history of philosophical ethics from Plato to Nietzsche. Philosophers covered may include Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4133. Contemporary Ethical Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A study of contemporary texts in philosophical ethics from G.E. Moore to the present. Philosophers covered may include Moore, Stevenson, Hare, Foot, and Rawls. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4143. Philosophy of Law (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A philosophical consideration of the nature of law, theory of adjudication, concepts of legal responsibility, liberty and the limits of law, and selected moral-legal issues (abortion, affirmative action, punishment, etc.).

PHIL 4183. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (Irregular). 3 Hours.

In his Critique of Pure Reason, one of the most important works in the history of philosophy, Kant describes how the mind works and claims to solve the major problems of metaphysics. The course is aimed at coming to a basic understanding of Kant's thought and at thinking critically about his claims.

PHIL 4203. Theory of Knowledge (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An examination of skepticism, the nature and structures of knowledge and epistemic justification, human rationality, and the justification of religious belief. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4213. Philosophy of Science (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Examination of issues related to scientific explanation, empirical foundations of science, observation and objectivity, nature of laws and theories, realism and instrumentalism, induction and confirmation, models, causation, and simplicity, beginning with historical survey set in the context of the history of science but emphasizing works from the 1930s to the current period, often including issues in recent physics.

PHIL 4233. Philosophy of Language (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A survey of mainstream philosophical theories of meaning, reference, truth, and logical form. Attention given to the views of such figures as Frege, Russell, Tarski, Searie, Dumett, and the advocates of possible world's semantics.

PHIL 4253. Symbolic Logic I (Fa). 3 Hours.

Rigorous analyses of the concepts of proof, consistency, equivalence, validity, implication, and truth. Full coverage of truth-functional logic and quantification theory (predicate calculus). Discussion of the nature and limits of mechanical procedures (algorithms) for proving theorems in logic and mathematics. Informal accounts of the basic facts about infinite sets. Prerequisite: PHIL 2203 or MATH 2603.

This course is cross-listed with MATH 4253.

PHIL 4303. Philosophy of Religion (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Types of religious belief and critical examination of their possible validity, including traditional arguments and contemporary questions of meaning.

PHIL 4313. Contemporary Jewish Thought (Irregular). 3 Hours.

A survey of trends in Jewish thought in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on the ways in which Jewish thinkers have responded to the events affecting Jews and the conditions of Jewish life from approximately 1900 to the present.

This course is cross-listed with JWST 4013.

PHIL 4403. Philosophy of Art (Sp). 3 Hours.

Varieties of truth and value in the arts and aesthetic experience, focusing on the creative process in the art and in other human activities.

PHIL 4423. Philosophy of Mind (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An examination of such topics such as the relationship between mind and body, the mentality of machines, knowledge of other minds, the nature of psychological explanation, the relationships between psychology and the other sciences, mental representation, the nature of the self, and free will and determinism.

PHIL 4603. Metaphysics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Theory and critical analysis of such basic metaphysical problems as mind and body, universals and particulars, space and time, determinism and free will, self-identity and individualism, with emphasis on contemporary perspectives. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 4983. Capstone Course for Philosophy Majors (Sp). 3 Hours.

An undergraduate seminar to be taken in the student's final spring semester. The content will vary with the instructor. The objective is for the student to sharpen his or her philosophical skills by, e.g., writing short papers, giving class presentations, and writing a substantial final essay. Prerequisite: 21 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5003. Ancient Greek Philosophy (Fa). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4003.) Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4003 and PHIL 5003. Prerequisite: Three hours of philosophy coursework.

PHIL 5013. Platonism and Origin of Christian Theology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4013.) The study of Plato, Middle Platonism, and Neoplatonism, including Philo, Plotinus, and Proclus, and the influence of Platonism on the Greek church fathers of the 2nd-5th centuries, principally Origen and Gregory of Nyssa and also Pseudo-Dionysius. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4013 and PHIL 5013. Prerequisite: Three hours of philosophy coursework.

PHIL 5023. Medieval Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4023.) Includes Augustine, Bonaventure, Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4023 and PHIL 5023.

PHIL 5033. Modern Philosophy-17th and 18th Centuries (Sp). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4033.) British and Continental philosophy, including Bacon, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4033 and PHIL 5033.

PHIL 5043. Nineteenth Century Continental Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4043.) Study of major Continental European philosophers of the 19th century including Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche. Emphasis on the nature of persons, the question of freedom, and the importance of self-expression, as well as views on knowledge, reality, and the nature of philosophy. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4043 and PHIL 5043. Prerequisite: 3 hours of Philosophy.

PHIL 5063. Twentieth Century Continental Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4063.) Study of major figures (e.g. Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Foucault, Derrida) and trends (phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, critical theory, deconstruction) in 20th century French and German thought. Topics include human beings and their place in the world, the role of history and culture, and the possibility of critical reflection. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4063 and PHIL 5063.

PHIL 5073. History of Analytic Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4073.) From Frege to recent figures, including Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Schlick, Carnap, Ayer, Ryle, Strawson, Quine, including a representative sample of works on the logical analysis of language, logical positivism, and ordinary language analysis. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4073 and PHIL 5073. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5093. Special Topics in Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4093.) This course will cover subject matter not covered in regularly offered courses. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4093 and PHIL 5093. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

PHIL 5103. Modern Jewish Thought (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4103.) A survey of the main trends in Jewish thought from the seventeenth through the nineteenth century. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4103 and PHIL 5103.

PHIL 5113. Social and Political Philosophy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4113.) Selected philosophical theories of society, the state, social justice, and their connections with individuals. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4113 and PHIL 5113.

PHIL 5123. Classical Ethical Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4123.) Study of classical texts in the history of philosophical ethics from Plato to Nietzsche. Philosophers covered may include Plato, Aristotle, Butler, Hume, Kant, and Mill. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4123 and PHIL 5123. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5133. Contemporary Ethical Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4133.) A study of contemporary texts in philosophical ethics from G.E. Moore to the present. Philosophers covered may include Moore, Stevenson, Hare, Foot, and Rawls. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4133 and PHIL 5133. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5143. Philosophy of Law (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4143.) A philosophical consideration of the nature of law, theory of adjudication, concepts of legal responsibility, liberty and the limits of law, and selected moral-legal issues (abortion, affirmative action, punishment, etc.). Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4143 and PHIL 5143.

PHIL 5183. Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4183.) In his Critique of Pure Reason, one of the most important works in the history of philosophy, Kant describes how the mind works and claims to solve the major problems of metaphysics. The course is aimed at coming to a basic understanding of Kant's thought and at thinking critically about his claims. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4183 and PHIL 5183.

PHIL 5203. Theory of Knowledge (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4203.) An examination of skepticism, the nature and structures of knowledge and epistemic justification, human rationality, and the justification of religious belief. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4203 and PHIL 5203. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5213. Philosophy of Science (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4213.) Examination of issues related to scientific explanation, empirical foundations of science, observation and objectivity, nature of laws and theories, realism and instrumentalism, induction and confirmation, models, causation, and simplicity, beginning with historical survey set in the context of the history of science but emphasizing works from the 1930s to the current period, often including issues in recent physics. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4213 and PHIL 5213.

PHIL 5233. Philosophy of Language (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4233.) A survey of mainstream philosophical theories of meaning, reference, truth, and logical form. Attention given to the views of such figures as Frege, Russell, Tarski, Searie, Dumett, and the advocates of possible world's semantics. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4233 and PHIL 5233.

PHIL 5253. Symbolic Logic I (Fa). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4253.) Rigorous analyses of the concepts of proof, consistency, equivalence, validity, implication, and truth. Full coverage of truth-functional logic and quantification theory (predicate calculus). Discussion of the nature and limits of mechanical procedures (algorithms) for proving theorems in logic and mathematics. Informal accounts of the basic facts about infinite sets. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4253 and PHIL 5253. Prerequisite: PHIL 2203 or MATH 2603.

PHIL 5303. Philosophy of Religion (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4303.) Types of religious belief and critical examination of their possible validity, including traditional arguments and contemporary questions of meaning. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4303 and PHIL 5303.

PHIL 5313. Contemporary Jewish Thought (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4313.) A survey of trends in Jewish thought in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, focusing on the ways in which Jewish thinkers have responded to the events affecting Jews and the conditions of Jewish life from approximately 1900 to the present. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4313 and PHIL 5313.

PHIL 5403. Philosophy of Art (Sp). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4403.) Varieties of truth and value in the arts and aesthetic experience, focusing on the creative process in the art and in other human activities. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4403 and PHIL 5403.

PHIL 5423. Philosophy of Mind (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4423.) An examination of such topics such as the relationship between mind and body, the mentality of machines, knowledge of other minds, the nature of psychological explanation, the relationships between psychology and the other sciences, mental representation, the nature of the self, and free will and determinism. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4423 and PHIL 5423.

PHIL 5603. Metaphysics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

(Formerly PHIL 4603.) Theory and critical analysis of such basic metaphysical problems as mind and body, universals and particulars, space and time, determinism and free will, self-identity and individualism, with emphasis on contemporary perspectives. Graduate degree credit will not be given for both PHIL 4603 and PHIL 5603. Prerequisite: 3 hours of philosophy.

PHIL 5823. Seminar: Spinoza (Irregular). 3 Hours.

PHIL 5883. Seminar: Wittgenstein (Irregular). 3 Hours.

PHIL 5933. Seminar: Philosophical Theology (Irregular). 3 Hours.

PHIL 5983. Philosophical Seminar (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Various topics and issues in historical and contemporary philosophy. May be repeated for up to 3 hours of degree credit.

PHIL 600V. Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Master's Thesis. May be repeated for degree credit.

PHIL 690V. Graduate Readings (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Supervised individual readings in historical and contemporary philosophy.

PHIL 700V. Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-18 Hour.

Doctoral Dissertation. Prerequisite: Candidacy. May be repeated for degree credit.