Courses

ECON 2013. Principles of Macroeconomics (ACTS Equivalency = ECON 2103) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Macroeconomic analysis, including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy, growth and business cycles. Credit will be allowed for only one of ECON 2013 and AGEC 2103. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or higher, or a score of 26 on the math component of the ACT exam, or 600 on the math component of the SAT.

This course is cross-listed with AGEC 2103.

ECON 2013H. Honors Principles of Macroeconomics (Fa). 3 Hours.

Macroeconomic analysis, including aggregate employment, income, fiscal and monetary policy, growth and business cycles. Credit will be allowed for only one of ECON 2013H and AGEC 2103. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or higher or a score of 26 on the math component of the ACT exam, or 600 on the math component of the SAT.

This course is cross-listed with ECON 2013, AGEC 2103.

ECON 2023. Principles of Microeconomics (ACTS Equivalency = ECON 2203) (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Microeconomic analysis, including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. Credit will be allowed for only one of ECON 2023 and AGEC 1103. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or higher, or a score of at least 26 on the math component of the ACT exam, or a score of at least 600 on the math component of the SAT.

This course is cross-listed with AGEC 1103.

ECON 2023H. Honors Principles of Microeconomics (Sp). 3 Hours.

Microeconomic analysis, including market structures, supply and demand, production costs, price and output, and international economics. Credit will be allowed for only one of ECON 2023H and AGEC 1103. Prerequisite: MATH 1203 or higher, or a score of 26 on the math component of the ACT exam, or 600 on the math component of the SAT.

This course is cross-listed with ECON 2023, AGEC 1103.

ECON 2143. Basic Economics: Theory and Practice (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Surveys basic micro, macro principles and analytical tools needed to study contemporary economic problems such as inflation, unemployment, poverty, and pollution. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration.

ECON 2143H. Honors Basic Economics: Theory and Practice (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Surveys basic micro, macro principles and analytical tools needed to study contemporary economic problems such as inflation, unemployment, poverty, and pollution. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration.

This course is equivalent to ECON 2143.

ECON 3033. Microeconomic Theory (Sp, Su, Fa). 3 Hours.

Nature, scope, and purpose of economic analysis; theories of demand, production, cost, firm behavior, allocation of resources, etc., in a market-oriented system. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or (ECON 2143) and (MATH 2043 or MATH 2554).

ECON 3053. Economics for Elementary Teachers (Fa). 3 Hours.

For students who plan to become teachers in elementary schools. Acquaints students with basic concepts and functioning of the American economic system. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration. Recommended to be completed in the fall semester of junior year. Prerequisite: 40 hours of completed course work.

ECON 3063. Economics for Secondary Educators (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Economics for Secondary Educators teaches basic economics understandings equipping students to make sound economics decisions as consumers, investors, voters and savers. Lessons and activities appropriate for secondary classes will be demonstrated. The course will survey materials available for government, economics, world and U.S. history, environmental science, language arts, business education, personal finance and entrepreneurship classes. Not open to students majoring in Economics or Business Administration. Recommended to be completed in the fall semester of junior year. Prerequisite: 40 hours of completed course work.

ECON 3133. Macroeconomic Theory (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Theoretical determinations of national aggregate employment, income, consumption, investment, price level, etc. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143) and ((MATH 2043 or MATH 2554)).

ECON 3333. Public Economics (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Governmental functions, revenues; tax shifting, incidence; public expenditures, their effects; and fiscal policy. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 3433. Money and Banking (Sp). 3 Hours.

Financial history; theory and practice of financial institutions; monetary policy in theory and practice. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 3533. Labor Economics (Fa). 3 Hours.

Economic analysis of labor markets. Topics include analysis of labor demand and supply; human capital investment; wage differentials; discrimination; economic effects of labor unions and collective bargaining; public sector labor markets; unemployment; and labor market effects on inflation. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 3633. Economics of Advertising (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An examination of how economists define and categorize types of products and advertising campaigns. Alternative views of advertising -- persuasive vs. informative -- are discussed. Models of the relationship between advertising and sales, profits, market structure, product quality, and price are examined. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON 3843. Economic Development, Poverty & the Role of the World Bank and IMF in Low-Income Countries (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Examine theories and patterns of economic development in emerging economies. The role of the World Bank and IMF as multilateral lenders and examination of their success and failures in fostering development. Measures of poverty and inequality and their implications for economic development. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 3853. Emerging Markets (Fa). 3 Hours.

An analysis of the business and economic environment in emerging countries; focusing in Latin America, South East Asia and Transition Economies. The topics and issues covered include market structure and market failures, financial and legal background, current institutions and political economy issues, and current business opportunities. Prerequisite: ECON 2143; or ECON 2013 and ECON 2023.

ECON 3933. The Japanese Economic System (Sp). 3 Hours.

This class presents essential facts about the Japanese economy and then subjects them to modern economic analyses. Japanese institutions and policies are contrasted with their American counterparts, and these economies are compared in terms of performance. Current issues including contemporary economic conditions and US - Japanese trade relations are also examined. Pre- or Corequisite: ECON 2023. Prerequisite: ECON 2013 or ECON 2143.

ECON 399VH. Honors Course (Irregular). 1-3 Hour.

Primarily for students participating in Honors program. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON 4003H. Honors Economics Colloquium (Fa). 3 Hours.

Explores events, concepts and/or new developments in the field of Economics. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ECON 4033. History of Economic Thought (Sp). 3 Hours.

Historical, critical analysis of economic theories relative to their instructional background. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143 or ECON 3053.

ECON 410V. Special Topics in Economics (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Covers special topics in economics not available in other courses. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON 410VH. Honors Special Topics in Economics (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Covers special topics in economics not available in other courses. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

This course is equivalent to ECON 410V.

ECON 4173. Nation Model United Nations (Fa). 3 Hours.

This class is designed to prepare students for their participation in a Nation Model United Nations (NMUN) Conference. The NMUN Conference is sponsored by The National Collegiate Conference Association (NCCA), which is the largest college-level Model United Nations conference. This course is designed to advance the research skills of the students by requiring extensive background position papers covering various economic and social issues of their assigned committee and ultimately preparing resolution documents they develop during the conference. They will present their positions via speeches and in caucus settings. This course will broaden the students' international perspective while they gain a thorough understanding of the primary activities of the United Nations. Prerequisite: Junior standing and departmental consent.

ECON 4333. Economics of Organizations (Fa). 3 Hours.

An economic perspective on the design of organizations. Applies developments in game theory and contract theory to analyze the role of information and incentives within and between firms. Covers the boundaries of firms, integration and outsourcing, authority and incentives, and alternative organizational structures in an evolving business environment. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 4423. Behavioral Economics (Sp). 3 Hours.

Both economics and psychology systematically study human judgment, behavior, and well-being. This course surveys attempts to incorporate psychology into economics to better understand how people make decisions in economic situations. The course will cover models of choice under uncertainty, choice over time, as well as procedural theories of decision making. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON 4433. Experimental Economics (Fa). 3 Hours.

The course offers an introduction to the field of experimental economics. Included are the methodological issues associated with developing, conducting, and analyzing controlled laboratory experiments. Standard behavioral results are examined and the implications of such behavior for business and economic theory are explored. Prerequisite: ECON 2023 or ECON 2143.

ECON 450V. Independent Study (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Permits students on individual basis to explore selected topics in economics. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON 4533. China's Foreign Trade and International Order: History, Policy, and Theory (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course explores China's foreign trade and international order by introducing students to the historical context and economic theory necessary for understanding China's role in the international trading system from the ancient past to the contemporary era.Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

This course is cross-listed with HIST 4533, PLSC 4533.

ECON 4633. International Trade (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Problems of the international economy from a microeconomic perspective. Topics include analysis of the pattern and content of trade; trade in factors of production; and the applications of trade theory to the study of trade barriers such as tariffs and quotas. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 4643. International Macroeconomics and Finance (Sp, Fa). 3 Hours.

Problems of the international economy from a macroeconomic perspective. Topics include national income accounting and the balance of payments; exchange rates and the foreign exchange markets; exchange rate policy; macroeconomic policy coordination; developing countries and the problem of 3rd world debt; and the global capital market. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143.

ECON 468V. International Economics and Business Seminar (Irregular). 1-6 Hour.

Offered primarily in conjunction with international study abroad programs with an emphasis on international economics and business. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON 4743. Introduction to Econometrics (Sp). 3 Hours.

Introduction to the application of statistical methods to problems in economics. Prerequisite: ((ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or ECON 2143) and ((MATH 2043 or MATH 2554 or higher)) and (WCOB 1033 or STAT 2303).

ECON 4753. Forecasting (Fa). 3 Hours.

The application of forecasting methods to economics, management, engineering, and other natural and social sciences. The student will learn how to recognize important features of time series and will be able to estimate and evaluate econometric models that fit the data reasonably well and allow the construction of forecasts. Prerequisite: (ECON 2013 and ECON 2023) or (ECON 2143) and (MATH 2043 or MATH 2554) and (MATH 2053 or MATH 2053C) and (WCOB 1033 or STAT 2303).

ECON 5233. Mathematics for Economic Analysis (Su). 3 Hours.

This course will develop mathematical and statistical skills for learning economics and related fields. Topics include calculus, static optimization, real analysis, linear algebra, convex analysis, and dynamic optimization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and MATH 2554 or equivalent.

ECON 5243. Economics of Supply Chain & Retail (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course will provide students with a strong foundation in core economics principles, with emphasis on industrial organization issues and applications geared toward the supply-chain and retail focus of the redesigned MBA program.

ECON 5253. Economics of Management and Strategy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

Information economics and applied game theory.

ECON 5373. Global Business (Su). 3 Hours.

Integrated overview of the global business environment and the organizational challenges of a multinational firm. To enhance understanding of the business and cultural environment of prominent emerging markets, the course includes a 2-3 week overseas immersion project to fulfill a predefined goal. Project is integrated with global content upon return.

This course is cross-listed with MGMT 5373.

ECON 5433. Macroeconomic Theory I (Fa). 3 Hours.

Theoretical development of macroeconomic models that include and explain the natural rate of unemployment hypothesis and rational expectations, consumer behavior, demand for money, market clearing models, investment, and fiscal policy.

ECON 5533. Microeconomic Theory I (Fa). 3 Hours.

Introductory microeconomic theory at the graduate level. Mathematical formulation of the consumer choice, producer behavior, and market equilibrium problems at the level of introductory calculus. Discussion of monopoly, oligopoly, public goods, and externalities.

ECON 5853. International Economics Policy (Irregular). 3 Hours.

An intensive analysis of the operation of the international economy with emphasis on issues of current policy interest.

ECON 600V. Master's Thesis (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

ECON 6233. Microeconomic Theory II (Sp). 3 Hours.

Advanced treatment of the central microeconomic issues using basic real analysis. Formal discussion of duality, general equilibrium, welfare economics, choice under uncertainty, and game theory.

ECON 6243. Macroeconomic Theory II (Sp). 3 Hours.

Further development of macroeconomic models to include uncertainty and asset pricing theory. Application of macroeconomic models to explain real world situations.

ECON 636V. Special Problems in Economics (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-6 Hour.

Independent reading and investigation in economics. May be repeated for up to 9 hours of degree credit.

ECON 643V. Seminar in Economic Theory and Research I (Fa). 1-3 Hour.

May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.

ECON 644V. Seminar in Economic Theory and Research II (Sp). 1-3 Hour.

Independent research and group discussion.

ECON 6533. Seminar in Advanced Economics I (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This seminar will cover advanced fields of current research importance in economics. This will facilitate the development of research directions for doctoral study and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ECON 6543. Seminar in Advanced Economics II (Irregular). 3 Hours.

This seminar will cover advanced fields of current research importance in economics. This will facilitate the development of research directions for doctoral study and research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ECON 6613. Econometrics I (Fa). 3 Hours.

Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. The single equation model is examined emphasizing multicollinearity, autocorrelation, heteroskedasticity, binary variables and distributed lags. Prerequisite: MATH 2043 and knowledge of matrix methods, which may be acquired as a corequisite, and ECON 2023, and an introductory statistics course or equivalent.

ECON 6623. Econometrics II (Sp). 3 Hours.

Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. The treatment of measurement error and limited dependent variables and the estimation of multiple equation models and basic panel data models will be covered. Additional frontier techniques may be introduced. Prerequisite: ECON 6613.

ECON 6633. Econometrics III (Sp). 3 Hours.

Use of economic theory and statistical methods to estimate economic models. Nonlinear and semiparametric/nonparametric methods, dynamic panel data methods, and time series analysis (both stationary and nonstationary processes) will be covered. Additional frontier techniques may be covered. Prerequisite: ECON 6613.

ECON 6713. Industrial Organization I (Fa). 3 Hours.

This course will develop the theory of modern industrial organization. The latest advances in microeconomic theory, including game theory, information economics and auction theory will be applied to understand the behavior and organization of firms and industries. Theory will be combined with empirical evidence on firms, industries and markets. Prerequisite: ECON 5533 and ECON 6233.

ECON 6723. Industrial Organization II (Sp). 3 Hours.

This course surveys firm decisions, including setting prices, choosing product lines and product quality, employing price discrimination, and taking advantage of market structure. It will also cover behavioral IO, which reconsiders the assumption that firms and consumers are perfectly rational and examines the role of regulation. Prerequisite: ECON 5233.

ECON 6833. International Development I (Fa). 3 Hours.

A first graduate level course in development economics with a focus on foundational theoretical issues. We explore the causation, implications, and remedies for pervasive and persistent poverty in low-income countries. Emphasis will be primarily on microeconomics topics. May be taken either as a precursor to International Development Economics II or stand-alone. Prerequisite: ECON 5533, (ECON 5613 or AGEC 5613) or by instructor's permission.

ECON 6843. International Development II (Sp). 3 Hours.

A second graduate level course in development economics that focuses on the empirical aspect of development in low-income countries. The course explores various microeconomics topics related to poverty, human capital accumulation, and their interactions with role of public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 5533, (ECON 5613 or AGEC 5613) or by instructor's permission.

ECON 6913. Experimental Economics (Fa). 3 Hours.

The course develops advanced concepts in the use of controlled experiments to test economic theory and explore behavioral regularities relating to economics. The class focuses on the methodology of experimental economics while reviewing a variety of established results. Prerequisite: ECON 5533.

ECON 700V. Doctoral Dissertation (Sp, Su, Fa). 1-18 Hour.

Prerequisite: Candidacy.